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M 




M.C. MIGEL MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
American Foundation for the Blind 

15 West 16th Street, New York, New York 
10011 




^•\Sb /•' 



&.. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 



Volume 21 



January 1952 



No. 1 



I 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



; 



Braille Edition Provided by the U. S. Government 

Through The Library of Congress 

and 

Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 

1&39 Frankfort Avenue 

Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the Editor, Diva Agostinelli 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16 th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 






*r% 



0t C 



CONTENTS 
January 19$ 2 



to 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

TALKING BOOKS 

DISTRIBUTING LIBRARIES FOR GOVERNMENT-OWNED BOOKS 

LIBRARIES GIVING NATION-WIDE SERVICE 

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS MAGAZINE 

A RELIGIOUS CALENDAR IN BRAILLE 

LOUTS CORKILL 

HAND-COPIED BOOKS 



2. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, January 1952 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 



m 



All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Govern- 
ment. Copies of these Government-supplied books are placed in the twenty-eight regie: 
al libraries which serve the blind. A list of these libraries appears regularly in 
the January and June numbers of the magazine. 

Readers are required to borrow books from the library designated by the Library 
of Congress to serve their respective territories. 

In the list which follows, the book notations are based on information appear- 
ing in the "Book Review Digest" and other standard reference works. 



/. 



, 



Bennett, Kemys D. The fabulous wink, 2v 1951 CPH 

The Rev. William Anker is on a holiday in Normandy and is pursued by Miss Biddle- 
stone Hackett. These two witness a miracle by a minor Saint; he winks at them. 
The visitors are convinced of the genuineness of this unorthodox revelation, but 
the local Bishop proclaims the wink to have been the work of the Devil. Lightly 
humorous, fantastic story. 

J Bishop, Curtis Kent (Curt Brandon, pseud.). High, wide and handsome. 2v 1950 
BIA A "Diamond D" Western novel 

v Brenner, Anita, retold by. Boy who could do anything; and other Mexican folk tales, 
lv 19U2 APH $2.95 Juvenile 

t/Eames, Genevieve T. A horse to remember. 2v 19U7 APH 
/ A story for boys and girls, ten years or older. 

"^Edman, Irwin. Four ways of philosophy. 2v 1937 HP 

The Henry Ward Beecher lectures delivered by the author at Amherst College. The 
author attempts to define, using historical illustration, four typical and re- 
i current ways of philosophical thought. 

v Eney, John K. ...For thou art with me. Reprinted from "Redbook Magazine, "May 1951. 
lv APH 
Erdman, Loula G. The edge of time. 3v 1950 APH 

A tender and understanding^ written novel about the "sodbusters." It tells the 
story of a young couple who started their married life as homesteaders in the 
Texas Panhandle in 1885. 
... v Great league of the Iroquois. Reprinted from "Horizon," journal of the Philosophi- 
cal Research Society, lv 19Uu APH 

VHall, Manly P. The fine art of being a person. Reprinted from "Horizon," journal 
of the Philosophical Research Society, lv 19U7 APH 

VHall, Manly P. Right thinking; the royal road to health, 5th edition, lv 1931 APH 

vjkenderson, Lois T. Look'. I can see the wind. Reprinted from "Redbook Magazine," 
May, 1951. lv APH 

An article written by the mother of a blind boy, who will never forget the day 
her child said, "Mummy, look'. I can see the wind." 
lighet, Gilbert. The art of teaching. 3v 1950 APH 

"This is a book on the methods of teaching," states the preface of this book. 
It is not a book of educational theory, but a book of suggestions drawn from 
practice. "It is called the art of teaching because I believe that teaching is 

J an art, not a science." Reviews mostly favorable. 

International Conference of Workers of the Blind. The place of the blind in the 
I ■ modern world, lv 19h9 NIB f" , ,' ^^A-A 1 

^Kuntz, A. Prayer book for the blind, lv 1930 BIA 

/Mackintosh, Elizabeth. To love and be wise. 3v 1950 APH A mystery story 



3. 

ans, Florence C. A candle in the mist; a story for girls. 2v 1931 APR 
O'Meara, Walter. The grand portage. Uv 1951 APH 

Daniel Harmon' s love for a wealthy Canadian girl who flouted him drove him into 
the Northwest in the early 1800 1 s. He is determined to keep free from an alliance 
.with an Indian girl, but in time he accepts the life of the rugged frontier and 
/marries a half-breed daughter of a Frenchman. Reviews generally favorable. 
^Rogers, Will. The autobiography of Will Rogers; selected and edited by Donald Day, 
with a foreword by Bill and Jim Rogers. 5v 1921-U9. BIA Also available in 
Talking Book. 

Donald Day has selected the best of Will Rogers autobiographical stories from 
the newspaper column Will Rogers wrote from 1922 to 193?. These articles are 
both the story of Will Rogers and an informal history of the United States during 
/ the boom, the bust and the New Deal. 
/Singmaster, Elsie. A boy at Gettysburg. 2v 192U APH (Not a publication of the 
I U. S. Government) Juvenile fiction 
J Smith, Elva S., and Ha z eltine, Alice I., compilers. Mystery tales for boys and girls, 

5v 19U6 APH Juvenile mystery stories 
\/ Sumner, Cid R. Sudden glory. Uv 195 1 CPH 

A novel of family life in Mississippi in the years after the Civil War. Story 
tells of years in Rhoda Lee Dal ton' s life which change her from a carefree tree- 
climbing fifteen-year-old into a grownup young lady. Writing fluent but some 
/ characterizations stereotyped. 
* Van Every, Dale. The captive witch. Uv 1951 CPH 

An historical novel in which the characters moved from the settled parts of Vir- 
ginia to the Kentucky wilderness. 



VCv 



TALKING BOOKS 



Cushman, Dan. Montana, here I be. llr 1950 APH Read by Livingston Gilbert 

/ A Western, telling the story of how Comanche John, road agent, took sides in a 
/ freighting fight against his ancient enemy, Captain Brass. 
^Hickey, James C. Introducing the universe. 8r 1951 AFB Read by Delmar Nuetzman 
A highly readable, lucid description of the most important observed features of 
the universe. For young people, yet the book can be recommended to anyone who 
desires a no n- technical, simple, yet accurate account of the results of modern 
/ observational astronomy. 
sMoran, James D. Desperate men; revelations from the sealed Pinkerton files. 21r 
19U9 APH Read by Paul Clark 

Based on sealed Pinkerton files, these are the stories of two groups of outlaws: 
Jesse James and his gang, and Butch Cassidy and the Wild Bunch. Most reviews 
/highly favorable. 
yMacDonald, Betty. Anybody can do anything. lUr 1950 APH Read by Terry Hayes 
The author of "The Egg and I," Miss MacDonald continues the humorous reminis- 
/ cences. This book deals with the experiences of the author and her sister in 
/ job hunting and job losing during the depression. Mixed reviews. 
/Millikan, Robert A. Autobiography of Robert A. Millikan. 21r 1950 APH Read 
by Walter Gerard 

At eighty-two, four years after his retirement, Robert Millikan publishes this 
life story of a genial and intelligent Mid -Western farm boy who came to manhood 
just when the science of physics was undergoing its greatest revolution. His 
book is the intimate story of his vital part in that revolution. New York 
Herald Tribune 



u. 



} Morehouse, Ward. Matinee tomorrow; fifty years of our theatre. 26r 19U8 APH 
Read by Kenneth Meeker 

Informal, anecdotal history of the New York stage from 1898 to 19U8 by the drama 
critic of the "New York Sun." Reviews favorable 
0. Henry Memorial Award. Prize stories of 19li9j selected and edited by Herschel 
Brickell. 2Ur 19U9 APH Read by William Gladden 

Reviewers generally agreed that this was one of the best collections of short 
stories in this annual series. 
'Stevenson, Robert Louis. Treasure Island. 13r APH Read by George Patterson 
/ A new recording of the famous classic which replaces the old recorded edition. 
Tarkington, Booth. Magnificent Ambersons. l8r 1919 APH Read by Burt Blackwell 
The Ambersons run the gamut of sudden wealth and gradual deterioration character- 
istic of many middlewest families which rose to great local importance in the 
Seventies. The novel won the Pulitzer prize for 1919. 



Residents of — 
Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

California 
(southern) 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 



DISTRIBUTING LIBRARIES FOR GOVERNMENT-OWED BOOKS 

Borrow books from — 

Kriegshaber Library for the Blind, 679 Piedmont Avenue, N. E., 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Library for the Blind, Seattle Public Library, 731 North 3fith 
Street, Seattle, Washington 

Braille Institute of America Library, 7Ul North Vermont Avenue, 
Los Angeles, California 

Oklahoma Library Commission, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

California State Library, 2709 Derby Avenue, Sacramento, Calif, 

Braille Institute of America Library, 7Ul North Vermont Avenue, 
Los Angeles, California 

B.:-r">ks for the Blind, Denver Public Library, 37th and York 
Sheets, Denver, Colorado 

Library for the Blind, New York Public Library, 137 West 25th 
Street, New York, New York 

Free Library of Philadelphia, Lcgan Square, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania 



District of Columbia Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 



Florida 



Georgia 



Florida Library for the Blind, Welch Convalescent Center, 
F. C. B. No. 12, Daytona Beach, Florida 

Kriegshaber Library for the Blind, 679 Piedmont Avenue, N. E., 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Hawaii 



Library of Hawaii, Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii 





V 

Idaho 


Library Association of Portland, 801 S. W. Tenth Avenue, Port- 
land, Oregon 




Illinois (north 
of Springfield) 


Department of Books for the Blind, Chicago Public Library, 
Chicago, Illinois 




Illinois (south, in- 
cluding Springfield) 


Illinois School for the Blind Library, Jacksonville, Illinois 




Indiana 


Service for the Blind, Indiana State Library, Indianapolis, 
Indiana 




Iowa 


Illinois School for the Blind Library, Jacksonville, Illinois 


1 


Kansas 


Wolfner Memorial Library for the Blind, 3BUU Olive Street, St. 
Louis, Missouri 


1 


Kentucky- 


Cincinnati Public Library, 629 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 


Louisiana 


Library for the Blind, Public Library of New Orleans, New 
Orleans, Louisiana 




Maine 


Perkins Institution Library, Water town, Massachusetts 




Maryland 


Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 




Massachusetts 


Perkins Institution Library, Watertown, Massachusetts 




Michigan (outside of 
Wayne County) 


State Library for the Blind, Saginaw, Michigan 




Michigan (Wayne 
County) 


Department for the Blind, Wayne County Library, 3661 Trumbull 
Avenue, Detroit, Michigan 


ft 


Minnesota 


Minnesota Braille and Sight-Saving School, Faribault, Minnesota 1 




Mississippi 


Library for the Blind, Public Library of New Orleans, New Or- 
leans , Louisiana j 




Missouri 


Wolfner Memorial Library for the Blind, 38UU Olive Street, St. 
Louis, Missouri 




Montana 


Library for the Blind, Seattle Public Library, 731 North 35th 

Street, Seattle, Washington 1 




Nebraska 


Nebraska Public Library Commission, State Capitol, Lincoln 9, 

Nebraska j 




Nevada 


California State Library, Sacramento, California 




New Hampshire 


Perkins Institution Library, Watertown, Massachusetts 




New Jersey 


Free Library of Philadelphia, Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 



6. 



New Mexico 



Books for the Blind, Denver Public Library, 37th and York 
Streets!., Denver, Colorado 



New York (other than Library for the Blind, New York State Library, Albany, N. Y. 
Greater New York City 
and Long Island) 



New York (Great- 
er New York City 
and Long Island) 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 



Ohio (south of 
Columbus ) 



Library for the Blind, New York Public Library, 137 West 25th 
Street, New York, New York 



Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

Minnesota Braille and Sight-Saving School, Faribault, Minne- 
sota 

Cincinnati Public Library, 629 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 



Ohio (no th, includ- Library for the Blind, Cleveland Public Library, Cleveland, Ohio 
ing Columbus) 



Oklahoma 
Oregon 



Pennsylvania (east 
of Harrisburg) 



Oklahoma Library Commission, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

Library Association of Portland, 801 S. W. Tenth Avenue, Port- 
land, Oregon 



Free Library of Philadelphia, Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Pennsylvania (west, Division for the Blind, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, 
including Harrisburg )Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



Puerto Rico 

Rhode Island 
South Carolina 
Tennessee 
Texas 
Utah- 
Vermont 



Library for the Blind, New York Public Library, 137 West 25th 
Street, New York, New York 

Perkins Institution Library, Water town, Massachusetts 

Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

Cincinnati Public Library, 629 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Texas State Library, Austin, Texas 

Books for the Blind, Free Public Library, Salt Lake City, Utah 

'° Library for the Blind, New York Public Library, 137 West 25th 
Street, New York, New York 



Virginia 
Virgin Islands 



Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

Library for the Blind, New York Public Library, 137 West 25th 
Street, New York, New York 



7. 



Washington 
Jest Virginia 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming 



Library for the Blind, Seattle Public Library, 731 North 35th 
Street, Seattle, Washington 

Division for the Blind, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania 

Department of Books for the Blind, Chicago Public Library, Chi- 
cago, Illinois 

Books for the Blind, Free Public Library, Salt Lake City, Utah 



LIBRARIES GIVING NATION-WIDE SERVICE 

Braille Circulating Library, 70lj. West Grace Street, Richmond, Virginia 
Circulates only religious books 

Jewish Braille Library, 18U6 Harrison Avenue, New York 53* New York 

New York Guild for the Jewish Blind, 1880 Broadway, New York 23, New York 

Theosophical Book Association for the Blind, Krotona, Ojai, California 
Circulates only theosophical books 

Xavier Society for the Blind Library, l5U East 23rd Street, New York 10, New York 



ABS 
AFB 
APH 

ARC 

BIA 

CPH 

HP 
JBI 

LC 

NIB 



LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS MAGAZINE ^ 

American Bible Society, U50 Park Avenue, New York 22, New York 

American Foundation for the Blind, 15 West 16th Street, New York 11, N.Y. 

American Printing House for the Blind, 1839 Frankfort Avenue, Louisville 
6, Kentucky 

American Red Cross, 616 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 

Braille Institute of America, 7ul North Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles 2?, 
California 

Clovernook Printing House for the Blind, 6990 Hamilton Avenue, Cincinnati, 
Ohio 

The Howe Press, Perkins Institution, Watertown, Massachusetts 

Jewish Braille Institute of America, 18U6 Harrison Avenue, New York 53, 
New York 

Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

National Institute for the Blind, 22!± Great Portland Street, London W 1, 
England 



_ ^b-K'' 



U.U^ <jwO V^ ^x^J^ Gjjfl* \k\b**»**J) 



*> - 8. 

NY Guild New York Guild for the Jewish Blind, 1880 Broadway, New York, New York 

NYPL New York Public Library, Library for the Blind, 137 West 25th Street, 
New York, New York 

TBA Theosophical Book Association for the Blind, Krotona, Ojai, California 

Xavier Xavier Society for the Blind, 15U East 23rd Street, New York 10, N. Y. 

A RELIGIOUS CALENDAR IN BRAILLE 

A religious calendar for 1952 has been published in braille grade 1^ by the 
John Milton Society. The price is fifty cents. The calendar is an exact repro- 
duction of the Motto Calendar, compiled each year since 188U by a well-known Quaker 
family in Philadelphia. The braille calendar consists of twenty-eight embossed 
pages, 11" x 11", and includes non-sectarian scripture verses, poems and quotations. 
To order, send fifty cents with name and address directly to the John Milton Society, 
1^6 Fifth Avenue, New York 10, New York. 



LOUIS CORKILL 

Every so often a beginning writer comes along who breaks all the rules and gets 
away with it. Here's the record of Louis Corkill, a mystery author whose "Fish 
Lane," reviewed last week: (1) he submitted the book, unsolicited and un-agented, 
and it was accepted by the first publisher to see it, Bobbs-Merrill — that happens 
about once in every ten thousand cases; (2) he set his story against a rural back- 
ground, violating a rather well-established American custom that whodunits are 
best "did" in the cities; (3) he composed the book on a Braille typewriter. Corkill 
is blind. Of course the editors at Bobbs-Merrill can't read Braille, so the final 
draft of the MS. was typed from dictation. 

Corkill is U8 years old and was born in Spring Valley, Illinois. Now living 
in Butte, Montana, he began writing about ten years ago as a hobby — he was a me- 
chanic and carpenter before he went blind. He regards himself as a one-man captive 
audience of a Talking-Book machine, records for which, furnished by the Library of 
Congress, include a great many mystery stories. Like most addicts he thought he 
could do better than a lot of the stuff that was coming out. Unlike most, he did. 

— N. Y. TIMES "Book Review," September 30, 1951 



1 



HAND-COPIED BOOKS 



This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Un- 
less otherwise indicated, these books are in Grade 2. 

How to locate hand-copied books in libraries: Following each title in this 
list you will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are the 
abbreviations for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the libraries 
in which you will find the books. A key to these abbreviations, giving the names 
and addresses of each library and publishing house, is included in every January 
and June issue. 



renner, Anita. The wind that swept Mexico. 2v 19U3 NYPL 
A brief history of the Mexican revolution from the overthrow of Diaz to the be- 
ginning of World War II. 
/Cole, Wallace H. The Kenny method of treatment for infantile paralysis, lv 19U2 

/ Student Library, NYPL 
-porneille, Pierre. Horace. 2v Student Library, NYPL 
^Creekmore, Raymond. Little skipper, lv NYPL Juvenile fiction 



■-: 



lv Grade I] 



7v 



1935 Student Library, NYPL 
19U7 Student Library, NYPL 



lv Student Lib- 



2v Student 



Uv 193U Stu- 



Ets, Marie Hall. Mister Penny. 

II Juvenile fiction 
-French text: Chardenal, C. Second course. 

French text: Malakis, Emile. Intermediate French functional grammar and conversa- 
tion. Uv Student Library, NYPL 

French text: Renard, Jules, Poil de Carotte; comedie en un acte. 
J rary, NYPL 

Hitchcock, Alfred M. Composition and grammar. 8v 1929 NYPL 
,/Hoffman Legal Publishing Company. The law of domestic relations. 

/ Library, NYPL 
vuames, Clifford Lester. An outline of the principles of economics, 

/^dent Library, NYPL 
*Kells, Lyman M.j Kern, Willis F.j and Bland, James R. Spherical trigonometry with 

/ naval and military applications. Uv 19U2 Student Library, NYPL 
vMacFadyen, Mary. Beauty plus; the key to beauty, health and charm. Uv 1938 NYPL 

iMcFarland, Ross A. Physically handicapped workers; experience in ifar industries. 

lv 19UU NYPL 
jMarriott, James William. Modern drama, Uv 193U Student Library, NYPL 
jOgg, Frederick A., and Ray, P. 0. Introduction to American government, fifth edi- 
tion. 19v Student Library, NYPL A standard college textbook 
\ijossetti, Dante Gabriel. Selected poems. 3v Student Library, NYPL 
VSpanish text: Baroja, Pio. Zalacain el aventurero., Uv 1932 Student Library, 
1 NYPL 
'Spanish text: Pan American World Airways. Frases utiles, from the Air Traveler's 

4 Dictionary. English-Spanish, lv NYPL 
panish text: Rivera, Guillermo. Libro de temas castellanos. 
Library, NYPL 
^Steiner, Rudolph. The Bible and wisdom, lv 19Ul NYPL 
Student Outlines Co, An outline of history of French literature. 
/ ages to 17th century. 2v 19U7 NYPL 
^Student Outlines Co. An outline of history of French literature. 
/ century to present. Uv 19U8 NYPL 
J Beasley, Norman. Politics has no morals. Uv 19U9 NY Guild 

A book written in sharp terms about dishonesty in government. The author's 
/ criticisms of the Roosevelt administration is sure to arouse the ire of Mr. 
/ Roosevelt's admirers. 
^-Burton, Jean, Lydia Pinkham is her name. 3v 19U9 NY Guild 

A highly diverting account of the remarkable Lydia Pinkham who founded the extra- 
ordinarily successful business of making and selling Lydia Pinkham' s Vegetable 
Compound . 
Cadell, Elizabeth. Brimstone in the garden. Uv 19^0 NY Guild 

A combination ghost story and social satire laid in a tiny English village which 
/ makes a good thing of playing up its quaintness for the sake of the tourist trade. 
'Csnfield, Dorothy. Four-square. Uv 19U9 NYPL 

^ishitan, Robert E. Leading constitutional decisions. 12v 1925 Student Library. 
NYPL 
Dalrymple, Leona. In the heart of the Christmas pines, lv 1913 Student Library, 
NYPL 



3v 193U Student 



Part I. Middle 



Part II. 18 th 



10, 




French texts La Fontaine, Jean de. 100 fables; edited with an introduction, notes, 
/and vocabulary by 0. B. Super, Uv Student Library, NYPL 
Friedman, Frieda. Peppy, the lonely puppy, lv Grade li 19hl Chicago 
Juvenile fiction 
imm, William A. From colony to world power. 15>v 19H7 NY Guild 
lorney, Karen, editor. Are you considering psychoanalysis? 3v 19U6 NYPL 
A symposium by six practicing psychoanalysts which answers such questions as: 
What is a neurosis? How long does analysis take? What does it cost? How do 
you choose an analyst? What does he do at analytical sessions? Will analysis 
I- J really help?, etc. . 

,/li.alian text! Dante, Alighieri. La divina commedia. }v Student Library, NYPL 
\I|fin Yutang. Chinatown family. $v Grade l| 19U8 Chicago 

A story dealing with the experiences of the Fong family in their move from a 
Chinese village to a New York laundry. 
luckman, Sid, Luckman at Quarterback. Uv Grade l|- 19U9 Chicago 

The story of Sid Luckman who rose to football fame at Columbia University and 
/ later became a star in professional football. 
. Magner, James A. Personality and successful living. Uv Grade l| 19k$ Chicago 
/ The procurator of Catholic University of America presents a guide which deals 
/ with everything from neatness in dress and good manners at table to the cure 
: / /of jealousy and the problems of sex. 
Moore, George E. Philosophical studies. £v 1922 NYPL 
^Pearson, Gerald H.J. Emotional disorders of children. 7v 19U9 NY Guild 

A book aimed at a better understanding of the clinical problems of children who 
suffer from neuroses, character disturbances and psychoses. The author attempts 
to clarify the underlying causes of the disturbances and the reasoning of the 
analysts. 
/Poliakov, Alexander. White mammoths. Translated from the Russian by Norbert Guter- 
man. 2v Grade lj 19^3 Chicago 
The author was a correspondent for the "Red Star" during World War II. This 
//book describes the fighting around Lake Ilmen during the winter of 19U1-U2. 
/bawling, L. Landmarks and surface markings of the human body, 2v 19U0 Student 
^-Library, NYPL 
^/tfobinson, Henry M. Tne Cardinal, 13v 1950 NY Guild Also available as Talking 

y'Book 
y^//k novel about the career of an American Roman Catholic priest. 
C/Roosevelt, Eleanor. ' This I remember. lOv Grade lj 19U9 Chicago Also available 
as Talking Book 

The second volume of Eleanor Roosevelt's autobiography. This volume begins with 
y the days before Franklin D. Roosevelt' s first term as governor of New York and 
/ ,ends a short time after his death. 
V Skinner, Cornelia Otis, and Kimbrough, Emily. Our hearts were young and gay. 3v 
\j 19U2 Sacramento, Cleveland, LC. Recently added NY Guild 
Smith, Dorothy G. I capture the castle. 8v Grade 1^ 19U8 Chicago Also available 
as Talking Book 

A novel that skirts the whimsical. It purports to be the notebook of adolescent 
poetry-writing Cassandra Mortmains. 
'Spahr, Margaret. Readings in recent political philosophy. lUv 1935 Student 
J Library, NYPL 

Spanish text: Antologia de cuentos espanoles, edited by Hill and Buceta. 2v Stu- 
/ dent Library, NYPL 
lySpanish text: Cancion de cuna^ edited by Aurelio M. Espinosa. 3v 19U3 Student 
Library, NYPL 



sA. 




11. 

fish text: Cuentos hispanicos. Collected and edited by John A. Crow. Uv 1939 
Student Library, NYPL 
faite, Terence H. Mistress Masham' s repose, liv 19U6 NY Guild 

A fantasy which ties together a story of a poor, little rich girl in modern Eng- 
land, and a picture of the life and "oeconomy" of a colony of Lilliputians living 
in hiding on a tiny island in an artificial lake in the grounds of a ruined Eng- 
/' lish castle. 
^Tldrich, Pess S. Journey into Christmas, and other stories. 3v 19U9 NYPL Also 
available as Talking Book 

A collection of nine short stories, excerpts from the author's novels and a clos- 
ing chapter about the author's childhood in Iowa. Folksy, lamp lit stories which 
are all about Christmas. 
Baruch, Dorothy W. Understanding young children. Iv 19h9 NYPL 

A short book which parents of ycung children will find useful. The author is a 
/^fell-known consultant in child guidance problems. 
Crfke c ity College course in music appreciation. 2v 1937 Student Library, NYPL 
i/Coles, Manning, pseudonym. Without lawful authority. 6v 19u3 LC A mystery novel 
[ijalgleish, Alice. America begins. Iv 1938 NYPL Juvenile stories about American 
/ history 
^De Angeli, Marguerite. The door in the wall. 2v 19U9 NYPL 

A stirring and poetic story set in the England of Edward the Third. For children, 
/ grades U-7. 
V Eliot, T. S. Collected poems . 3v 19U9 Detroit 

Collected in one volume are the poems (including "The Wasteland" and "Prufrock") 
which have made Mr. Eliot one of the most influential poets of our generation. 
The poetry is marked by a trenchancy of phrasing, a dramatic use of symbols and 
great beauty. 
'Eliot, T. S. Notes toward the definition of culture. 3v 19U9 Detroit 

A poet's discussion on the meaning of culture. His iieas may be labeled conser- 
/ vative, but it is an intelligent conservatism which arouses violent disagreement 
/ and praise. It is not a simple book but one that requires more than superficial 
, / thought. Reviews mixed. 
^Eliot, T. S. Selected essays. 6v n.d. Detroit 

Critical essays dealing in the main with literary and religious themes. 
Ernst, Morris Leopold, and Loth, David. American sexual behavior and the Kinsey 
report. 3v 19U8 LC 

This book attempts to demonstrate what lessons can be learned from Dr. Kinsey' s 
monumental report on the sexual behavior of American men. It is marked by a 
/ proselytizing zeal and a liberal point of view. Reviews generally favorable. 
v/Faulkner, William. Intruder in the dust. $v 19U8 Detroit 

A Negro is held in a Mississippi jail, charged with the murder of a white man. 
While a mob assembles, two sixteen-year-old boys, one white, one Negro, assemble 
.evidence to prove his innocence. They are aided by an elderly spinster of aris- 
f / tocratic background. Dramatic and emotionally powerful. Reviews mostly favorable 
French texts Fite, Alexander G. Three one-act plays. Contents: Un arriviste; La 
dame de bronze et le monsieur de cristalj La paix chez soi. Iv 1938 Student 
y Library, NYPL 
vuipson, Frederick. The home place. Uv 1950 LC 

When Sam Crockett's wife died, he took his three young sons and his old grand- 
father back to the North Texas hill ranch where he had been born and raised, 
/ leaving behind a good job in Kansas City, Reviews mixed, 
f/ireene, Graham. The third man. 2v 1950 LC 

Mystery thriller set in Vienna during the Allied occupation. Based on the motion 
picture of the same name. 






12 

Hersey, John R. The wall. l$v 1950 LC 

The wall of the title refers to the enclosure built by the Nazis to confine the 
Jews in Warsaw. This long novel based on diaries and contemporary records chron- 
icles the last days in the ghetto for the handful who survived the massacre. The 
coarseness, the squirming torture, the degradation of finely attuned people from di 
ease, filth, hunger and no privacy are strained through the compassion of the 
diarist. It is a story of humanity transcending horror. 



f 



^j^c^y^ 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 



Volume 21 



February 1952 



No. 2 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West l6th Street 
New York 11, N. Y« 



» 



Braille Edition Provided by the U. S. Government 
Through The Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the Editor, Diva Agostinelli 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



CONTENTS 
February 1952 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

TALKING BOOKS 

"HOW YOU SPELL IT" 

EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY 
From "Twentieth Century Authors" 

HAND-COPIED BOOKS 






BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, February 1952 



2. 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Govern- 
ment unless otherwise noted. Copies of these Government-supplied books are placed 
in the twenty-eight regional libraries which serve the blind. Readers are requir- 
ed to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of Congress to serve 
their respective territories. A list of these libraries and their territories ap- 
pears regularly in the January and June numbers of the magazine. 

In the list which follows, the book notations are based on information appear- 
ing in the "Book Review Digest" and other standard reference works. 

Alcott, Louisa May. Little men. Uv 1951 APH 

A new edition of the famous sequel to "Little Women." 

Bagnold, Enid. The loved and envied. 3v 1951 BIA 

Portrait of a way of life and of Lady MacLean, the "loved and envied." Her 
life, her loves, and her effect upon those around her are described, as well 
as the conflicts with a daughter who is overshadowed. Excellent reviews. 

Baldwin, Faith. The whole armor. Uv 1951 BIA 

A novel about a young Presbyterian minister in a Manhattan church. 

Bates, Herbert Ernest. Tne scarlet sword. 3v 1950 APH 

A novel set in India during the days of the partition. The scene is a Catholic 
mission where Hindus as well as British took refuge with the nuns and priests, 
•.against, murder, rape and pillage. Reviews generally favorable- 
Clark, Alfred A. G. (Cyril Hare, pseudonym). An English murder. 2v 1951 CPH 
A murder mystery. 

Crabb, Alfred L. Reunion at Chattanooga. 3v 1950 HP 

Another story in the series of books on life in Tennessee after the Civil War. 

Elwood, Muriel. Web of destiny. Uv 1951 CPH 

The fourth of Miss Elwood' s historical novels about Canada. The central char- 
acter of this book is Philippe, heir to the Courville Seignury at Montreal. 

Fletcher, Inglis C. Bennett's welcome. 6v 1950 APH 
The sixth novel in the author's Carolina series. 

Harper, Robert S. Lincoln and the press. 6v 195l APH 

Analy z es the attitude of the press toward Lincoln, especially during the Civil 
War years. The author puts special emphasis on the civilian attitudes toward 
editorial opinion, and concludes that large sections of the American press were 
hostile toward Lincoln. Reviews mostly favorable. 

Housman, Alfred E. The collected poems... lv 19U0 APH 

The first collection of Housman 1 s poems. Included are "A Shropshire Lad," "Last 
Poems," and "More Last Poems," as well as additional poems and translations. Mr. 
Housman' s poetry is simple, concise, and includes some of the finest lyric writ- 
ing in modern English poetry. 

McGillicuddy, Cornelius (Connie Mack). My sixty-six years in the big leagues; the 
great story of America's national game. 2v 1950 HP 

In telling of his own experiences as player and manager, Connie Mack tells the 
story of baseball from the days of bare hands to modern school of sluggers. 
Many anecdotes about players, great plays, memorable games, etc. 

Ross, Patricia F. Tne hungry moon, lv APH (Not a publication of the U. S. Govern 
ment.) Mexican nursery tales 

Stevenson, Dorothy E. Shoulder the sky. 3v 195l CPH 

Sequel to "Music in the Hills," it continues the story of the Johnstone's and 



3. 

their nephew, James. James is worried lest life on the remote sheep farm be 

too bleak for the London girl, Rhoda, who becomes his wife. 
Stout, Rex. The cop killer, lv 1951 APH A Nero Wolfe story. 
Tunis, John R. Young Razzle. 2v 19U9 APH 

A story which combines baseball action with the dramatization of human conflicts 

as a boy battles his father on the playing field. 



TALKING BOOKS 



Aiken, Conrad. Short stories of Conrad Aiken. 30r 1950 AFB Read by Alexander 
Scourby 

A collection of short stories by the distinguished American poet. The stories 
reveal a remarkable combination of the poetic and the realistic, with a deep ps;y 
chological insight. 

Augur, Helen. Tall ships to Cathay. 29r 1951 APH Read by Samuel Gifford 

A colorful book which recreates the adventurous and glamourous trade with China 
in the nineteenth century. It tells the story of the Low family of Salem, who 
established their trading company in spite of the opposition of the powerful 
East India Company. 

Bakeless, John. The eyes of discovery. 32r 1950 AFB Read by Karl Weber 

America, in the days when its interior was unknown and uncharted, is recreated 
in this narrative which follows the trails of the early explorers. 

Bro, Margueritte. Sarah. 23r 19U9 APH Read by George Barnes 

Sarah' s father died when she was eleven and Sarah worked hard to become the art- 
ist her father hoped she would be. The book is both the story of an artist's de- 
velopment and a family story. 

Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de. Three exemplary novels. Translated by Samuel Put- 
nam, llr 1950 AFB Read by Alexander Scourby 

The exemplary novels rank second only to Don Quixote in the works of the Spanish 
genius, Cervantes. Included in this collection are: "Rinconete and Cortadillo"; 
"Man of Glass"; "The Colloquy of Dogs." 

Christie, Agatha. They came to Baghdad. 13r 1951 APH Read by Morris Flournoy 
A mystery story. 

Cooper, James Fenimore. The last of the Mohiqans. 25r '18-26 APH Read by Paul 
Clark 

A new edition of the classic novel set in the days of the French and Indian War. 
The plot centers about a brave and noble Indian youth who is the "last of the 
Mohicans . " 

Cry of the thunderbird: the American Indians' own story. Edited by Charles Hamil- 
ton. 19r 1951 AFB Read by William Lazar 

A complete and authentic picture of Indian life, as pictured in the letters, 
speeches and writings of American Indians. 

Dickson, Marguerite. Turn in the road. 12r 19li9 APH Read by Mrs. Naomi Myrick 
The story of a year in the life of Isabel Worthington and her family which meant 
a turn in the road for them, as they move from Shanty Row to the position of 
respected members of their community. 

Gardner, Earle Stanley. The case of the fiery fingers. lUr 1951 AFB Read by 
Lauren Gilbert 
A Perry Maxon detective story 

Gilpatric, Guy, and Raine, Norman R. Qlencannon meets Tugboat Annie, llr 1950 
APH Read by Burt Blackwell 

The perennially thirsty Mr. Glencannon, engineer of the freighter, Inchcliffe 
Castle, and Tugboat Annie, of the Deep-Sea Towing and Salvage Company, meet at 
last, and the excitement is rare and confused. 



u. 



Grey, Zane. Ihe maverick queen. 19r 1950 APH Read by Livingston Gilbert 

A posthumous Western story by the noted Western novelist. 
Guerard, Albert. France: a short history. 17r 19U6 AFB Read by the author 

and Kermit Murdock 

"Ihis little book," says Dr. Guerard, "is my testament." It is the tragic and 

magnificent history of "eternal France." 
Hawthorne, Nathaniel. Ihe best of Hawthorne. Edited by Mark Van Doren. 35r 1951 

AFB Read by John Brewster 

A collection containing the "Scarlet Letter," and the stories, "Ethan Brand n 
"Rappacini' s Daughter," "Young Goodman Brown," "The Minister's Black Veil," and 

"The Celestial Railroad." There is an excellent introduction by t he editor. 
The John Milton Talking Book, Volume 1, January, 1952. 2r 1951 APH Read by 

Walter Gerard 

1951 AFB Read by Jan Tyroler 

The characters are Hungarian nobles of the 



Kelly, Eleanor M. Proud castle. 18 r 
A novel set in pre-Hitler Hungary. 



the atmosphere that of a decaying but picturesque society s 
Red river runs North. 



old regime, 

Kelsey, Vera. Red river runs North. 21r 1951 AFB Read by William Lazar 

The turbulent and little-known history of a river that flows from Minnesota to 
the southern end of Lake Winnepeg in Canada. 

Klingman, Lawrence, and Green, Gerald. His Majesty. 0' Keefe. 26r 1950 AFB Read 
by John Cannon 

David Dean 0' Keefe was an Irish-American sailing captain who for thirty years 
ruled a private empire in the South Seas. 

Lamb, Harold. Suleiman the Magnificent: Sultan of the East. 25r 195l AFB Read 
by John Knight 

A highly colored history of Turkey during the reign of Suleiman, in the sixteent 1 
century. 

Ley, Willy. Dragons in amber; further adventures of a romantic naturalist. 23r 
1951 APH Read by Jean Clos 

A book that combines scientific accuracy with humor and imagination. It deals 
with the origins and history of amber and proceeds to trace the evolution of 
extinct plants and animals, as well as rare living species. 

Mason, F. van Wyck. Proud new flags. 37r 195l AFB Read by Palmer Ward 
A novel about naval warfare during the Civil War. 

Myerson, Abraham. Speaking of man. 17r 1950 AFB Read by John Knight 

Dr.Myerson has devoted fifty years to medicine and psychiatry. His book re- 
flects wisdom, compassion and wit. 

Payne, Robert. The young emperor. 26r 1950 AFB Read by Barry Doig 

An historical novel about Stephen Taverner, a young Englishman of the seventeen- 
th century, who sails to India to make his fortune. After a series of lurid 
adventures, he becomes an emperor and marries a native princess. 

Roberts, Kenneth. Henry Gross and his dowsing rod. 19r 195l AFB Read by Carl 
Emory 

The author of "Northwest Passage" cites impressive evidence to support belief 
in the divining (or dowsing) rod. " He also blasts scientists who condemn without 
investigating. Henry Gross, the dowser of this book successfully located water 
on Mr. Robert's farm. 

Sherman, Ray W. How to win an argument with a Communist. l6r 1950 AFB Read by 
Kermit Murdock 

The author, after examining a number of the early Utopias, concludes that the 
end is dictatorship. He also concludes that Communist is one more unworkable 
Utopia . 



5. 

Short, Luke. Vengeance valley, llr 1950 AFB Read by Don MacLaughlin 
A Western novel 

Slaughter, Frank G. The road to Bithyniaj a novel of Luke, the beloved physician. 
30r 1951 AFB Read by John Brewster 

A fictionalized account of the life of St. Luke after he joined Christ's follow- 
ers. 

Street, James. The highcalling. 27r 1951 AFB Read by John Knight 

Walde. Steps to Christ. 8r 19.21 APH Read by Christian Record Benevolent Asso- 
ciation (Not a publication of the U. S. Government) 

Woodham-Smith, Cecil. Florence Nightingale, 1620-1910. 29r 1951 APH Read 
by Walter Gerard 

A new and complete biography, based on private papers and letters never before 
made public by Miss Nightingale's family. 

HOW YOU SPELL IT 

"How You Spell If—Spelling and Typewriting Syllabication of the 500 Most 
Troublesome Everyday Words. A booklet published by Remington Rand, Inc. Helpful 
to the typist, dedicated to the extermination of the misspelled word and to pro- 
per syllabication. This booklet has been press-brailled and may be ordered direct- 
ly from the Braille Transcribing Service, New York Association for the Blind, 111 
East 59th Street, New York 22, New York. The price is twenty cents postpaid. 



EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY 
From "Twentieth Century Authors" 

Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892-October 19, 1950), American poet, was 
born in Rockland, Maine, the daughter of Henry Tolman Millay and Cora L. (Buzzelle) 
Millay. Kathleen Millay, the writer, is her younger sister. Her first college 
work was done at Barnard College. She received her B.A. at Vassar College in 1917 
and has since had honorary degrees from Tufts College, the University of Wisconsin, 
and Russell Sage Foundation College. She began writing verse in her childhood, en- 
couraged by her mother, who recognized her unusual talent. She was still a student 

^when her first major published poem, "Renascence" (which appeared in "The Lyric 
^Year" in 1912) aroused general interest by its note of fresh beauty — though it was 
full of echoes as well.; and the year she was graduated from Vassar she published 
her first volume of poetry. She had already won thelntercolle giate Poetry Society 
prize. (Indidentally, Miss Millay, like Stephen Vincent Benet and many others, 

. first saw her poems in print in the "club" pages of the juvenile magazine, "St. 
Nicholas.") 

A period in Greenwich Village in its Golden Age followed, the period when one 
lived in an attic, wrote anything one could find an editor willing to accept, and 

- when, to quote Miss Millay herself, the young artists and writers of the Village 
were "very, very poor and very, very merry." In all the later and more mature work 
of Edna Millay, two persons persistently crop out — the barefoot, red-headed tomboy 
of Maine, and the sophisticated innocent of Greenwich Village. She became interest- 
ed in the theatre, joined the Provincetown Players in their early days, and publish- 
ed three plays in verse. Later she wrote the libretto of one of the few American 
grand operas, "The King's Henchman," by Deems Taylor. 

In 1923 she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for "The Harp-Weaver." It was in this 



6. 

volume that she first emerged as a consummate sonneteer. In the same year she mar- 
ried Eugen Jan Boissevain, a Hollander by birth, an importer, and the former hus- 
band of the beautiful young feminist, Inez Milholland, who died in the midst of 
her crusade. Mr. Boissevain abandoned his business to devote himself to fostering 
and protecting his wife's genius, and acted as her secretary, her buffer, and her 
bodyguard. They moved to a farm in upper New York, in the southern Berkshires, 
and lived there until her death, though she spent most of her summers in Maine. 

In the earlier years of her marriage, Miss Mi Hay frequently visited Europe. 
Later she tended more and more to isolate herself in the country, where she spent 
all day in her gardens in rough tweeds, and in the evening she dressed in formal 
clothes and dined in state with her husband. She always loved clothes, and even 
in her days of direst poverty in New York she managed somehow to look dainty and 
distinguished. She wrote by fits and starts, working hard while she worked, then 
doing nothing for idle weeks. Her poems were scrawled in cheap notebooks, and 
sometimes she herself could not read her own handwriting later on. She was a mem- 
ber of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. 

Gradually a social consciousness grew up within her, and she began to write (not 
invariably, but with increasing frequency) of the world outside herself. In a way 
she always had objectivity, for she could stand aside and write of her own emotions 
as if she were observing a stranger. Starting with her work on the Sacco and Van- 
zatti defense, but most apparent in the one book, "Conversation at Midnight," in 
which she does not appear at all, or appears effectively disguised, she became 
definitely a citizen of her own ora. She had, as Selden Rodman remarked, "long ago 
reached the limit of what she could say about herself." 

Though Edna Millaywas not a "poet's poet," she was the most popular poet (as 
opposed to versifiers) of her time, the only one who could live well by her writing, 
whose books were best sellers and collectors' items... 

Undoubtedly some of the furore aroused by her earlier poems was due to the period 
of their appearance; in those first volumes Edna Millay was the voice of rebellious 
"flaming youth," of the young people who were bent on gathering "figs from thistles" 
and burning their candles at both ends, of the girls who claimed for themselves the 
free standards of their brothers. Her personality, a bit touched by an aloof arro- 
gance, made her more than one articulate enemy, and she has been lampooned in one 
novel at least. But even those who have written of her most scornfully have grant- 
ed her genuine poetic power, and if nothing else were left of her work there would 
remain a few poignant lyrics and a few magnificent sonnets of individual stamp. 
Her style was intensely personal, and some of her youthful work now seems meretri- 
cious, but even that had tautness of line and precision of phrase... 

With the exception of Elinor Wylie in her last great series, no woman since Eli- 
zabeth Barrett Browning, it has been argued, excelled her in the sonnet form. 
Hildegarde Planner spoke of "the sense of freshness and transparent revelation that 
her early lyrics conveyed," of "the infusion of personal energy and glow into the 
traditions of lyric poetry, and the deceptively artless ability to set down the nak- 
ed fact unfortified." 

Editor's note: Among the author's works the following are in braille or Talk- 
ing Book form: 



The Buck in the Snow, and Other Poems, lv handcopied, NYPL, Oklahoma City 

Collected Sonnets, lv BIA 

A Few Figs from Thistles, lv handcopied, Sacramento 

The Harp-Weaver, lv handcopied, LC, NYPL 

Huntsman, What Quarry? lv APH 



7. 

The Kirtg' s Henchman. Grade 1£ lv AFH 

Lament from "Second April" . Included in the "Wbolcott Listener; Supplement" 

lr AFB 
The Lamp and the Bell. 2v handcopied, Albany 
Second April, lv handcopied, NYPL, LC, Sacramento, Chicago 
Make Bright the Arrows, handcopied, NYPL 
Renascence, and Other Poems, lv handcopied, Cincinnati 
Wine from these Grapes, lv handcopied, NYPL 

HAND-COPIED BOOKS 

This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the litraries. Unless 
otherwise indicated, these books are in Grade 2. 

How to locate hand-copied books in libraries: Following each title in this list 
you will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are the ab- 
breviations for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the libraries 
in which you will find the books. A key to these abbreviations, giving the names 
and addresses of each library is included in every January and June issue. 



Ames, Delano. She shall have murder. Uv 19U9 NYPL 
"~A detective story which introduces a new amateur sleuth, Dagobert Brown, who 

hates work and has hobbies. 
Bacmeister, Rhoda W. Your child and other people at home, at school, at play. 5v 

1950 LC , 

A guidebook to the social needs and adjustments of children from one to eight 

years of age. 
Beach, Joseph. American fiction, 1920-19UO. 8v Detroit. 

A critical analysis of the work of Dos Passos, Hemingway, Caldwell, Faulkner, 

Steinbeck, Farrell, Wolfe and Marquand, which evaluates their social attitudes 

as well as their literary methods and considers them as indicative of the trend 

of modern thought. 
Bellamann, Henry, and Bellamann, Katherine. Parris Mitchell of Kings Row. ?v 

19U8 LC 

This book was completed by Mrs. Bellamann after her husband's death. It is the 

second novel of a proposed trilogy which deals with the transition of a sleepy 

nineteenth century Midwestern village into an accelerated modern community. 
Bonner, Charles. The last romantic. 6v 19U9 LC 

A novel about three maladjustel young people in the 1930^3, embellished with 

newspaper-city room clamor and ideological undercurrents. 
Boyle, Kay. His human majesty. 5v 19U9 LC 

A story about a ski troop on maneuvers in the Colorado mountains in the winter 

of 19UU. Included are emigrees from Nazi invasions in Norway, Poland, Austria, 

Holland and France, as well as American soldiers. 
Brock, Emma L. Three ring circus. Grade l| lv 1950 NYPL Juvenile fiction 
Buck, Pearl S., and Robeson, Eslanda G. American argument. Uv 19U9 LC 

Personal conversations between Pearl Buck and Eslanda Robeson give a revealing 

and significant picture of America. Interesting comparison is made between grow- 
' ing up in China as a white child among Chinese people, and growing up in the 

United States as a Negro child in a white society. No subject is taboo in the 

conversation — women, children, sex, marriage, education, politics, Russia, labor, 

and inequality of opportunity. 
Cheyney, Peter. One of those things. 3v 19U9 NYPL Detective story 



8. 



Coyle, David C. Day of judgment, the economic and political challenge to the West. 
3v 19U9 LC 

Mr. Coyle develops the theory that the survival of civilization depends on 
whether we learn to distinguish between good and evil, learn to organize human 
relationships, learn to manage material things. 

Cuppy, William J. How to attract the wombat. 2v 19U9 LC 

Typical Cuppy humor dealing with mammals, insects, birds, etc. In each essay 
there is factual information, ■ enchanting footnotes and a deadly spoofing of the 
human race. 

Dodge, David. The crazy glasspeckerj or, High life in the Andes. Uv 19U9 LC 
Humorous account of the year the Dodge family spent in Arequipa, Peru. 

Dodge, David. Plunder of the sun. Uv 19U9 NY Guild. Recently added, LC. 
A detective story 

Eakin, Mildred 0., and Eakin, Frank. The church-school teacher's job. kv 19U9 LC 
A volume for church-school teachers based on the authors' experience, and modern 
educational techniques. 

Eustis, Helen. The captains and the kings depart, and other stories. 3v 19U9 LC 
A book of short stories. 

French text: Altschuler, Charles H. French idiomatic construction and French sub- 
junctive, lv 1928 Student Library, NYPL 

French text: Corneille, Pierre. Le Cid. 3v Student Library, NYPL 

French text: DeSauze, Emile. Cours pratique de francais pour commencants. 7v 1919 
Student Library, NYPL 

French text: France, Anatole. Le livre de mon ami. 3v Student Library, NYPL 

French text: Harvitt, Helene J., editor, Nouveaux contes divers, with notes, ques- 
tionnaires and exercises in grammar and syntax. 3v 1928 Student Library,NYPL 

French text: Moliere, Jean B. Les femmes savantes. 3v Student Library, NYPL 

French text: Racine, Jean B. Athalie. 2v Student Library, NYPL 

French text: Racine, Jean B. Phedre. 2v Student Library, NYPL 

Friedman, Frieda. Carol from the country. 2v 1950 NYPL Juvenile fiction 

German text: Deutsche novellen des neunzehnten jahrhunderts, edited by Robert 
Oswald Roseler. 12v 19Ul Philadelphia 
A collection of nineteenth century German fiction. 

Gilbreth, Frank B., and Carey, Ernestine G. Belles on their toes. Uv 1950 NYPL 
Recently a dded LC 

Hall, O.M. Murder city. 3v 19U9 NYPL Detective story 

Hammond-Innes, Ralph (Hammond Innes, pseudonym). The killer mine. 5v 19U7 LC 
Detective story 

Harsch, Joseph C. The curtain isn' t iron. 2v 1950 LC 

The author is a foreign correspondent for the "Christian Science Monitor," who 
has traveled widely in Eastern Europe. His thesis is that Western ideas can and 
do penetrate the borders of the Eastern European countries, and that Russian 
domination in some of them is already wobbly. 

Hoskins, Halford L. The Atlantic Pact* 2v 19U9 LC 

A short review of the Atlantic Pact and recent United States foreign policy. 

Italian text: De Amicis, Edmondo. Cuore. 3v 1935 Student Library, NYPL 
A novel by a well-known Italian novelist. 

Italian text: Flamini, Francesco. Storia della letterature italiana. 3v 192? 
Student Library, NYPL A survey of Italian literature. 

Laski, Marghanita. Little boy lost. 3v 19U9 NYPL 

Hilary i/feinright, a young English poet, had lost his wife and child in France dur- 
ing the war. He knew his wife had been killed by the Gestapo but he was not sure 
about his little son. The novel describes his search for the child in postwar 
France . 



9. 



Lawson, Robert. Rabbit hill. 2v 19UU NYPL A fantasy for young readers 

Levinger, Elma. Albert Einstein. 3v 19U9 LC 

The biography of the world's greatest living scientist is the story of a boy 
who hated school because he could not ask "why" and of the man, who, when asked 
to explain his theory of relativity, offered to play the violin which he felt 
his questioner would appreciate much more and understand much better. 

Lilienthal,. David E. This I do believe. 3v 19U9 LC 

Personal testament of one who has served in many public offices. 

Lockridge, Prances L., and Lockridge, Richard. Death of a tall man. Uv 19U6 LC 
A mystery novel 

Mason, Miriam E. A pony called Lightening, lv 19U8 NYPL Juvenile fiction 

Miller, Mary B. (Bolton, Isabel, pseudonym) Do I wake or sleep. 2v 19U6 LC 

A novel written in modified stream of consciousness form. Action takes place in 
twenty- four hours. There are three characters, two women and one man. 

Moody, Ralph. Little Britches; father and I were ranchers. Uv 1950 LC 

When the author was eight years old, his family moved to Colorado because the 
father was threatened with tuberculosis. For three years they worked hard to make 
a go of ranch life, but in the end were defeated. But in those years the boy 
learned to be a man and was able to take his father' s place when it became nec- 
essary. 

Moore, Robert H. Plan before you write. 2v 1950 NYPL A guide for young writers. 

Moore, John C. Tne fair field. Uv 19U6 LC 

In 19UU the author, a British Navy flier, was in Normandy watching a small French 
town go up in flames. With the thought that it was probably just such a town 
as the English one in which he spent his youth, he wrote down the story of that 
town. The years covered are 1907 to World War II. 

Nash, Bradley D., and Lynde, Cornelius. A hook in Leviathan; a critical interpre- 
tation of the Hoover Commission report. 5v 1950 LC 

This work is mainly a digest of the Hoover report aimed at the general reader 
who has not read the Commission's findings. 

Nathan, Robert. The river journey. 2v 19U9 LC 

4 fantasy on life, death and love. When Minnie Parkinson is told that she will & 

• soon-,, she persuades her husband to go with her on his long-desired river journey 
by houseboat to New Orleans, 

Norris, Kathleen T. High holiday. 5v 19U9 LC 

Chronicles the daily lives of the various members of a large San Francisco fam- 
ily, the Throckmortons. The story begins in the 1890' s and spans one generation. 

Northrup, George T. Selections from the picaresque novel. Uv 1935 Student Lib- 
rary, NYPL 

Oglivie, Elisabeth. My world is an island. 5v 1950 LC 

Record of the author's experiences on a little island off the coast of Maine, 
where she and two friends bought an old house and expended their combined ener- 
gies into making it into a home. Pleasant reading. 

Ruch, Floyd Leon. Psychology and life. 12v 19U8 Student Library, NYPL 
Third edition of a standard work. 

Ruesch, Hans. Top of the world. Uv 1950 LC Also available as Talking Book 
The adventures of an Eskimo family. 

Seager, Allan. The old man of the mountain, and seventeen other stories. Uv 1950 
NYPL 

The author, a novelist and teacher at the University of Michigan, has chosen 
eighteen of his favorite stories for this collection. 

Skinner, Cornelia Otis. Nuts in May. 2v 1950 NYPL 

A collection of thirteen articles, all but one of which appeared in the "New 
Yorker." They deal with various aspects of the author's life. 



( 



10. 

Smith, Dorothy G. I capture the castle. 6v 1°U8 LC Also available in grade 1^ 
handcopied Chicago 

A novel that skirts the whimsical. It purports to be the notebook of adolescent, 
poetry writing Cassandra Mortmains. 

Smith, Ira L», and Smith, H. Allen. Low and inside; a book of baseball anecdotes, 
oddities, and curiosities. 3v 19h9 LC 

Spanish text: Carrion, Miguel Ramos, and Vital Aza. Zaragueta. 2v Student Lib- 
rary* NYPL 

Spanish text: Gaya, Samuel Gili. Tirso de Molina. 3v Student Library, NYPL 

Spanish text: Rubio, David, and Neel, Kenri C, editors. Selections from Spanish 
anthology, lv Student Library, NYPL 

TITLES AVAILABLE FROM BRAILLE CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

The following new religious titles have been recently added to the Braille Cir- 
culating Library, 70U tfest Grace Street, Richmond, Virginia. They are available 
to blind readers anywhere in the United States for a six-week loan period. Send 
all requests for books directly to the Braille Circulating Library. 

Biography: 

Engstrorn, Judson T. Hour with Adoniram lv Grade lg 
Martin Luther, lv Grade 1^- 

Miller, Basil. Charles G. Finney. 3v Grade ih 
Miller, Basil. David Livingstone. 3v Grade 1§ 
Miller, Basil. George Mueller. 3v Grade lj 

Devotional books: 

Chambers, Oswald. Grow up unto Him. lv 
Chambers, Oswald. Our brilliant heritage, lv 
Harrison, N. ti. His comfort, lv Grade 1^ 
Maxwell, L. E. Born crucified * 3v Grade 1^ 
Maxwell, L. E. Crowded to Christ. £v Grade ljj 
Trumbull, Charles G. Life that wins, lv Grade In- 



fliction: 

Cannon, Brenda. Silver creek knob, lv Grade I5 

Fraser, Elise. Emerald necklace. 3v Grade 1^ 

Hutchens, Paul. True mystery solved, lv Grade 



il 



Miller, Basil. Patty Lou of the golden West, 2v Grade 1* 



(» 



«<?. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braills and Talking Book Publications 



Volume 21 



March 19^2 



No * 3 



Published Monthly, Exempt August, in Braille and Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 Wast 16 th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the U. S. Government 

Through The Library of Congress 

and 

Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 

1839 Frankfort Avenue 

Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the Editor, Diva Agostinelli 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



CON TEN T S 
March 1952 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

TALKING BOOKS 

CORRECTION— DISTRIBUTING LIBRARY 
SERVING THE STATE OF VERMONT 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LIST OF BRAILLE AND TALKING BOOKS RELATING TO GARDENING 

"BACH AND HAYDN FOR ORGAN" 

0. HENRY 
From "Twentieth Century Authors" 

HAND-COPIED BOOKS 



* 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, March 1952 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 



All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Govern- 
ment unless otherwise noted, Copies of these Government-supplied books are placed 
in the twenty-eight regional libraries which serve the blind* Readers are requir- 
ed to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of Congress to serve 
their respective territories. A list of these libraries and their territories ap- 
pears regularly in the January and June numbers of the magazine. 

In the list which follows, the book notations are based on information appear- 
ing in the "Book Review Digest" and ether standard reference works. 



U 



arth, Alan. The loyalty of free men. Uv 195l APR 

Includes discussions of Communism and how to deal with it; dangers inherent in 
punishment by publicity; practical operation of the loyalty program and its 
effect on scientific resaarchj the limitations of the FBI as an instrument for 
determining loyalty. Reviews mostly favorable, but, because of controversial 
nature of the book, those which were unfavorable were strongly so, 



clothing, 



7v 



3v 1951 APH 
lv 1937 APH 



19U9 APH $22,75 (Not 

A novel of the Southwest 
(Not a publication of 



v/» 



. Baxter, Laura, and Latzke, Alpha, Today's 
i, a publication of the U* S. Government) 
' Briscoe, Birdsall. Spurs from San Isidro, 
Bronson, Wilfrid S. Wonderworld of ants. 
- the U. S. Government) 
A dramatic presentation of the lives of many types of ants, written for younger 
children, but of interest to anyone looking for a simple, brief introduction to 
ants . 
Bushakra, Mary W. I married an Arab. 3v 195 l BIA 

The author, a Swarthmore graduate of Quaker extraction, met her husband when 
they were both students at the University of Seville. This story begins when 
she and her husband returned to Lebanon to begin their hilltop home U,000 feet 
above sea level. Simply and effectively written. 
VCalomiris, Angela. Red masquerade; undercover for the FBI. 3v 1950 BIA 

The author, a commercial photographer who joined the Communist party as an 
agent of the FBI, tells the story of her experiences. 
^Carroll, Gladys H. Christmas without Johnny, lv 1950 HP 

A Christmas story about shy, sensitive, nine-year-old Johnny. Because he had 
more mind than muscle, Johnny was something of a misfit until an understanding 
school superintendent gave him just the help he needed. For both children and 
adults . 
Carse, Robert. From the sea and the jungle. 3v 195l APH 

John Michaels, after a career as a rum-runner and gun-smuggler, settled down in 
. a West Indian republic to go straight as a hotel man. When the Germans began 
to sink American tankers-, Michaels was suspected. The novel shows his efforts 
/ to prove his innocence. 
l/Cerf, Bennett A. Laughter incorporated, the cream of the recent crop of stories 
and anecdotes, harvested, assorted, and prepared for market. 2v 1950 BIA 
The sixth collection of humorous stories, puns, etc., gathered and retold by 
Mr. Cerf. 
^Conant, James B. Science and common sense. Uv 1951 APH 

It is D'r. Conant' s opinion that the educated layman can obtain an understanding 
of the methods of science through the close study of a relatively few historical 
examples of the development of science. In this volume dealing with the tech- 
niques and approaches of experimental science, he puts this idea into operation, 
Result is a popular treatment of scientific methodology but one which still re- 
quires careful reading and thought. 



3. 



\/Cooper, Duff. Operation heartbreak. 2v 1950 NIB Psnda # II4.O. Price, 3s 3d 
per volume (Not a publication of the U. S, Government) 

A plain soldier' s tale which is a delightful tragi-comedy of military matters 
with a surprising and poignant climax. 
^Estes, Eleanor. The M ffats. 2v 19hl APH (Not a publication of the U. S. Gov- 
ernment) Juvenile fiction 

Giles , Janice H. Miss Willie. 3v 195 1 APH 

Miss Willie, the new schoolteacher from Texas, tried to reform the people of 
Piney Ridge, Kentucky, but without success. After Miss Willie married a Piney 
Ridge man, she discovered what was wrong with her outlook. 

Gorrell, Faith Lanman: McKay, Hughina; and Zuil, Frances, in consultation with 
Andrews, Benjamin R. Food and family living; revised. 8v 19U2 APH (Not a 
publication of the U. S. Government) 
t,'Mabie, Janet. Heaven on earth. 3v 1951 APH 

Reminiscences of the author 1 s childhood in Northfield during the days of its 
greatest fame, written with the easy competence and quick imagery of the best 
newspaper reporting. 
/McCord, James B., with Douglas, John Scott. My patients were Zulus. }v 1951 APH 
An account of an American medical missionary 1 s forty years of service among the 
South African Zulus. 

Meader, Stephen W. River of the Wolves. 2v 19Ufl APH (Not a publication of the 
U. S. Government) 

Dave Foster is captured by Indians while working on a Maine farm, and is carried 
off to Canada. After a winter spent with the tribe, he and a girl captive es- 
cape and make their way home. 

Roark, Garland. Rainbow' in the royals. Uv 1950' -APH- ' . ,-. .. ' •• 

Top-notch historical fiction set in California during the gold rush. The story 
centers about two brothers, Bill and Jim Quick, the sailing ships that took them 
to California, and the girl whom they both loved, 
v Robertson, Frank C. A ram in the thicket; an autobiography, 3v 1950 BIA 

The author is a prolific writer of Westerns, with more than fifty novels and 
a thousand magazine stories to his credit. This autobiography is mainly about 
his childhood days in Idaho, Utah and other parts of the West. 

Ross, Ishbel. Journey into light; the story of the education of the blind. 3v 
1951 HP 

A history of work for the blind from the earliest times to the present. Besides 
the description of broad trends in this field, there are dozens of sketches of 
individuals who have made important contributions. 
^Spanish text J Estrello, Francisco E., compiler. Con mi padre, en lo becreto. lv 
Spanish braille. Published by John Milton Society, 15>6 Fifth Avenue, New York, 
New York. (Not a publication of the U. S. Government) 

Waters, Ethel, with Charles Samuels. His eye is on the sparrow; an autobiography, 
Uv 1951 APH 

The life story of Ethel Waters' life from her wretched childhood in a Philadel- 
phia slum to her success as an actress. She minces no words in describing the 
sordid surroundings of her youth, her experiences with discrimination, and ul- 

.• timate success. There is bitterness and deep compassion in her story. Rave 
reviews . 

Webster's students dictionary: volume 33 — new words section, lv Grade if 1950 
APH-school edition. BIA-regular edition (Not a publication of the U. S. Govern- 
ment) 

This volume becomes volume 33 of the set. The old volume 33 becomes volume 3h 
of the set. 



h. 






• Welchons, A. M. , and Krickenberger, W. R. Plane geometry; revised edition. 12v 

1951 APH (Mot a publication of the U. S. Government) 

Last volume rewritten. Others revised to correspond with latest inkprint edition. 
Wentworth, George, and Smith, David E. Trigonometric and logarithmic tables, J,v 

1952 APH (Not a publication of the U, S. Government) 

(/World day of Prayer Service, 1952. lv Grade lj APH Published for John Milton 
Society, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York. (Not a publication of the U. S. 
Government) 

> Zahl, Paul A., editor.- - Blindness; modern approaches to the unseen environment. 
7v 1950 HP 

Under the auspices of the Veterans Administration, a group of experts have writ- 
ten the chapters which make up the book, It presents a comprehensive picture of 
both work for the blind and education of the blind as it stands today. 



TALKING BOOKS 

Akeley, Mary L, J. Congo Eden. 2 pts 28r 1950 APH Read by Terry Hayes Sales 
A comprehensive portrayal of the historical background and scientific aspects 
of the great game sanctuaries of the Belgian Congo, with the story of a six- 
months pilgrimage throughout this primitive region of Africa. 

Bentley, Edmund C. Elephants work. lUr 1950 APH Read by Morris Flournoy 

/ A mystery story. 
/Catton, Bruce. Mr. Lincoln's army. 23r 1950 APH Read by Walter Gerard 

The story of Lincoln' s Army of the Potomac during the early years of the Civil 
War. The controversy concerning General George B. McClellan emerges as a by- 
product of the larger story. Reviews generally favorable. 
"Wisher, Dorothy Canfield. Four square. 17r 19U9 APH Read by Kate McComb 

A collection of seventeen short stories, many of them about Vermont and Vermont- 
ers, and a few of them about war. 
vGodden, Rumer. A breath of air. 17r 195l APH Read by George Patterson 

A satirical parable which is a kind of modern "Tempest." A Scottish earl is 
the modern despot, his daughter, Charis, a modern Miranda. Two airmen are forced 
down on a nearby island, and the novel describes the effect of their arrival on 
the earl, his daughter, and the natives, 
' Gutheimi; Frederick. The Potomac. 2 pts 26r 19U9 APH Read by Eugene Earl 

Another in the Rivers of America Series, and an excellent one. Two chapters are 
devoted to Washington, D. C, but the upper reaches of the river as well as the 
Tidewater are not neglected. 

Henderson, J. Y. Circus doctor, as told to Richard Taplinger. 12r 195l APH 
Read by Paul Clark 

Reminiscences of the chief veterinarian to the Ringling Brothers, Barnum and 
Bailey circus. Good reviews. 

Hume, Edward H., M.D. Doctors courageous. 19r 1950 APH Read by George Barnes. 
Summaries of the lives of missionary doctors who labored in both Africa and 
Asia* 
\^ Johnson, Gerald W. Incredible tale; the odyssey of the average American in the last 
half century, l8r 1950 APH Read by Jean Clos 

Informal history of the forces and leaders who have had the greatest influence 
on the status and outlook of the American citizen. 

Kennelly, Ardyth. The spur. 2 pts 23r I95l APH Read by George Patterson 
Novel based on the last six days of John Wilkes Booth's life, the days when he 
was dying after his assassination of President Lincoln. In this period Booth re- 
views his life, showing how he arrived at his terrible decision. 



M 






5. 



tfr 



1950 APH Read by George 
AFB Read by Carmen 



l/M 



Lockridge, Richard and Frances. Foggy, foggy death. 

Patterson A Captain Heinrich mystery 
- Matheson, Jean, The cistern and the fountain. l8r 195l 

Matthews 

Mrs. Maudslie was forced to open her beautiful home in Scotland to paying guests, 

when her husband disappeared with all their money and her jewels. 
'Mizener, Arthur. The far side of paradise. 21r 195 1 APH Read by Kenneth Meeker 

A full-length biography of F. Scott Fitzgerald. It is a warm and vital portrait, 

always clear-eyed and psychologically acute. 
H?ratt, Fletcher. Preble' s boys ; Commodore Preble and the birth of American sea 

power. 28r 1950 APH Read by Milton Metz 

Using the biographies of fourteen men who held commands during the War of 1812, 

the author sketches the development of the officers' corp of the U. S. Navy from 
j the days of Commodore Preble. 

Stinetorf, Louise A. White witch doctor. l6r 1950 APH Read by Terry Hayes Sales 
y A novel in which the hero is an American medical missionary in the Belgian Congo. 
Stone, Irving. The President's lady. 23r 1951 AFB Read by Ethel Everett 

A biographical novel based on the lives of Andrew and Rachael Jackson. 
Stout, Rex. Murder by the book, 13r 1951 AFB Read by Karl Weber 

The nineteenth volume in the Nero Wolfe detective story novels. 
» Ullman, James R. River of the sun, 26r 1950 APH Read by Livingston Gilbert 

A philosophical novel that is also a tale of adventure. It relates the story of 

a search by a group of man and one woman for a legendary river in Brazil, 



Stc 



HOW YOU SPELL IT 

The New York Association for the Blind, 111 East 59th Street, New York, New York 
has informed us that the response to the notice concerning the booklet, "How You 
Spell It," has been so overwhelming that there will be a short delay in filling 
orders. They wish to assure all those who .have placed orders -that they will receive 
them as soon as it is possible. 

CORRECTION— DISTRIBUTING LIBRARY SERVING THE STATE OF VERMONT 

In the January issue of the "Braille Book Review," the distributing library serv- 
ing the State of Vermont was listed incorrectly. Residents of Vermont are to borrow 
books from the Library for the Blind, New York State Library, Albany 1, New York. 
We apologize to our readers for any inconvenience caused by this error. 



A CHANGE OF A DURESS 

We have been informed that the Library for the Blind of the Lutheran Church- 
Missouri Synod has recently moved from Chicago, Illinois to St. Louis, Missouri, 
new address is: Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, Library for the Blind, 210 North 
Broadway, St. Louis 2, Missouri. The Executive- Secretary is Rev. W. H. Storm, 
3U82 East Boulevard, Cleveland k, Ohio, 



The 



6. 



A PROPOSED MAGAZINE 



Some time ago we carried an announcement concerning a proposed braille magazine 
to cover activities of the Negro. We have recently been informed that the magazine 
is to be a bi-monthly publication of articles taken from leading magazines. In- 
quiries concerning the magazine, and address changes, should be sent directly to: 
Mrs. E. R. Merrick, 906 Fayetville Street, Durham, North Carolina. 

LIST OF BRAILLE AED TALKING BOOKS RELATING TO GARDENING 

Abbott, Daisy T. The indoor gardener. 2v Grade if NYPL handcopied 

Brewster, K« L. The little garden for little money. 3v LC handcopied 

Carter, I. In a herb garden. 3v NYPL handcopied 

Cobb, Ernest. Garden steps; a manual for beginners in vegetable gardening. Uv LC 

handcopied 
Farthing, F. Hadfield. Saturday in my garden; a practical guide to the cultivation 

of small gardens, with hints on their care and management. 5>v NYPL handcopied 
Foley, Daniel J. Annuals for your garden, lv Grade lj NYPL handcopied 
Follett, Muriel. New England year: a journal of Vermont farm life. 2v APH 
Gardens of the world, lv Grade If NYPL handcopied 
Giles, Dorothy. The little kitchen garden. 3v LC handcopied 
Hottes, Alfred C, editor. My garden helper. 3v 1939 APH 
McFarland, Horace, editor. The amateur's book of the garden series: Roses and how 

to grow them. 3v LC handcopied 
Meade, ? . Bouquets and bitters; a gardener's medley. Uv NYPL LC handcopied 
Morrison, G. Quick freezing and family food gardening. 3v NYPL handcopied 
Nissley, Charles H. Home vegetable gardening, l6r 19U5 APH Read by Paul Clark 
Ogden, S. R, How to grow food for your family. 2v 19U2 APH 
Parmenter, Ross, Plant in my window. 6r 19U9 AFB Read by the author 
Tabor, Grace. The loose-leaf gardener. 2v 193U APH 
Truth from the soil, lv Grade if NYPL handcopied 
Watts, Ralph L. Vegetable gardening. £v 1932 APH 
Wilson, Helen, A garden in the house; the culture of bulbs, house plants and ter- 

rariums. 2v Grade if NYPL handcopied 

BACH AND HAYDN FOR ORGAN 

...The Archive Series of the Deutsche Grammophon Company, issued by Decca, has en- 
gaged an organist of considerable repute in Germany, Helmut Walcha. Not the least 
of Walcha' s accomplishments is that of playing all his recitals from memory — and 
indeed memorizing virtually all of the organ works of Bach — by necessity, for he is 
blind. This is purely incidental information, however, since his playing is scholar- 
ly enough to stand on its own merits. Walcha limits his performances to the "classic- 
style" organ, the type of instrument that is apparently lending new meaning to the 
word "baroque." Most succinctly stated, it is the pipe organ before it became imi- 
tative of instruments in the orchestra. 



It is Albert Schweitzer's opinion (in "Out of My Life and Thought") that 



,on 



modern instruments Bach's organ music cannot be played as he intended. On the in- 
struments of his day the forte and the fortissimo were at their fullest so soft that 
a piece could be played through even in the latter without the hearer being fatigued 
thereby or feeling any need of change. Similarly, Bach could give his hearers a 
continual forte with his orchestra. But o.i modern organs the fortissimo is so loud 



7. 

and so harsh that the listener cannot endure it for more than a few moments. He is, 
further, not in a position, amid all the roar, to follow the individual lines of 
melody, though that is necessary for the understanding of a composition cf Bach's. 
One is obliged, therefore, with modern organs to make tolerable for the listener by 
changes of volume and tone color, long passages which Bach meant to be given in an 
unbroken fortissimo." 

Long before Bach' s time, and for a short while after his death, the organ was 
known and accepted for its own peculiar tone quality, largely deriving from the 
diapasons. The last quarter of the eighteenth century felt the influence of an 
indefatigable performer and organ designer — we would probably call him a "tonal 
architect" today— named Georg Joseph Vogler. His consecrated mission in life ap- 
parently was to turn the organ into a portable one-man orchestra, and he is given 
the dubious credit of having invented the "orchestrion," which he used for his 
traveling concert series . * • 

Although Vogler succeeded in having many fine European organs converted into 
romantic imitations of other instruments, a few organs escaped his magic touch, and 
have remained alive through two major conflicts and a few preliminary bouts. Two 
of these are heard in these Bach recordings. 

The six Trio Sonatas of Bach are issued on two LP's, the five Chorale-Preludes 
and six Schubler chorales on one twelve-inch disc, and the recordings are rather 
evenly divided between the small organ of the church of St. Jakobi at Lubeck and 
the Schnitger organ at Cappel. Arp Schnitger' s reputation as organ builder has 
come down from Bach's time to this, for a number of organs built in the United States 
Hi thin the past few years have been patterned upon the Schnitger idea. For perform- 
ing the music of Bach, Pachelbel, Buxtehude, and Fresccbaldi, they are superb. 

Walcha has succeeded in differentiating the tone quality of the three lines in 
the Trio Sonatas, which were, of course, written for a "trio" of organ voices. Al- 
though Karl Phillipp Emanuel wrote that no one knew the art of registration like his 
father, and that the art died with him, Walcha is one of those of our time who shows 
perception and remarkably good taste. Particularly good is his interpretation of 
the convention of a sparkling registration for allegro passages, and a more bland 
tone color for slow movements, although some listeners have found the two- foot ad- 
dition to the soprano line (in the Lubeck instrument) unnecessarily insistent and 
shrill. 



Tne six chorales which are conveniently grouped under the name "Scbubler" aro 
all derived from church cantatas. Perhaps the best known is "Waehet Auf. ," the 
theme from Cantata 1I4.O. A handsome reed on the St. Jakobi organ takes the canto 
fermo under the familiar figuration in flutes. The balance of the six are equally 
impressive and the registration for each is handled in a way to make it stand apart 
from the rest in its own individuality. 

No convenient family grouping exists for the five Chorale-Preludes which comprise 
the other side of this disc. Three of them are #uite well-known, in one form or 
another, and are among the most interesting of Bach's writing in this field: 
"Rejoice, Beloved Christians," one of the two versions of "By the Waters of Babylon," 
and "Farewell Will I Give Thee," Walcha plays no tricks with tempo, yet his per- 
formance is none the less interesting. Because of the nature of the instruments he 
plays, in which all the pipe work is unenclosed — no Venetian blind shutters to 
stifle the tone for soft passages — he employs the principles of "terraced dynamics" 
in which changes in volume are made step by step between phrases, by adding or sub- 



8. 



tracting ranks of pipes. That, after all, is how this music was conceived. 

Excerpts from "Bach and Haydn for Organ," by- 
David Hebb. Saturday Review of Literature ,, 
.February 23, 19^ pp. 65-66, 



0. HENRY 
Ecom "Twentieth 1 Century Authors" 

0. Henry (September 11, l862-Juno» 5> 1910), American short-story writer, was born 
William Sydney Porter at Greensboro, N. C. His father was a physician, but more in- 
terested in perpetual motion. The mother died when her son was only three. He left 
school, conducted by an aunt, at fifteen, and worked for five years in his uncle's 
drug store. In 1882 he went to Texas for reasons of health. In Austin, he spent 
ten years as clerk and bookkeeper, draftsman in a state land office, and bank teller. 
A romantic elopement with his first wife, Athol Estes, took place July 5, 1887. Some 
first sketches appeared in the Detroit "Free Press." In 189U he bought Brann' s 
"Iconoclast" for $250, rochristening the paper "The Rolling Stone" when the erst- 
while owner asked to have the name restored to him. Giving up the paper a year 
later, Porter tried a year in Houston, Texas, where the "Daily Post" printed his 
"Tales of the Town" and "Some Postscripts." These were collected and edited in 1939. 

Suddenly Porter was summoned to Austin to stand trial for the embezzlement of 
funds from the First National Bank, where he had been teller. It is probable' that 
Porter was only technically guilty, since the methods of management there were amaz- 
ingly lax. On the way back for trial, however, he caught a train going in an oppo- 
site direction and made his way to New Orleans, where he unloaded bananas. Honduras 
was the next stop, where he "knocked around with the refugees and the consuls." News 
of his wife's serious illness brought Porter back to Austin in 1897* In March of 
the next year he was sentenced to the Federal ward of the Ohio Stato Penitentiary 
for five years, lessened to three years and three months by his exemplary behavior. 
His duranco was not wholly vile, since he was allowed to praEtice his old profession 
of pharmacy, sleep in the prison hospital, and occasionally to roam the streets at 
night. Porter wrote several stories in prison under various pen names. The exact 
derivation of "0. Henry" is somewhat of a mystery; it possibly refers to Orrin Henry, 
a prison guard. 

Leaving prison in July 1901, Porter went to Pittsburgh, thence to his beloved 
Bagdad-on-the-Hudson, New York City, at the invitation of Oilman Hall, an editor of 
"Ainslee' s Magazine. " He haunted streets, parks, and restaurants, talking to all 
sorts and conditions of people. In 190U he wrote sixty-five stories, fifty the next 
year, usually putting off the actual writing until goaded by editors, from whom he 
had received advances. An average daily consumption of two quarts of whiskey failed 
to paralyze his creative faculty: in his lifetime he turned out 600 pieces of ori- 
ginal fiction. Porter kad few intimate friends apart from his editors and his second 
wife, Sara Lindsay Coloman, whom he married November 21, 1907. From time to time he 
went to Asheville, but returned to New York to die of tuberculosis at forty-eight. 
He was stricken at the Caledonia Hotel June 3, and his death occurred two days later 
at the Polyclinic Hospital, East 35th Street. "Pull up the shades," 0.. Henry asked 
the nurse, adding in a paraphrase of the words of a popular song of the day, "I don' t 
want to go home in tho dark." His funeral at the Little Church Around the Corner, 
it so happened, was scheduled at the same hour as a wedding. 



KA* 



'As "H 



^ 



h 



9. 



0. Henry was essentially a raconteur who, in the words of Carl Van Doren, "saw 
human life as a tissue of episodes rather than as any broad general process." His 
vision was ironic but not embittered. The characters he devised were familiar and 
simple to his readers; the stories were "written in plain vernacular, diversified 
by adventurous slang." The slang, naturally, is sometimes unintelligible when read 
today, and the local allusions have lost their point. Kis stories have a sameness 
in theme and structure, relying on a few formulae, such as the essential inertia of 
human nature, The "sharp unlooked-for twist at the end of the stories" is almost the 
0. Henry trademark. In 1918 the Society of Arts and Sciences founded the 0. Henry 
Memorial award for the best American short story published each year, and Greensboro 
commemorated its son with the 0. Henry Hotel. His once immense vogue has, however, 
waned in an era x*hen even the popular magazines show a trend away from the formulariz- 
ed, machine-made plot. He still remains, nevertheless, the acknowledged master of 
the "genre" he so largely created, and the fact remains that a few of his stories 
have survived the generation of their writing* 

Editor's note: Among the author's works the following are in braille or Talking 
Book form: 

Babes in the jungle, lr AFB 

Bird of Bagdad, lr AFB 

The four million. lOr APH 

The four million. 2v APH 

Gentle grafter. Grade lj 2v APH 

Jimmy Hayes and Muriel* lv ARC 

Lost on dress parade.,,. \? - AFB 

Memoirs of a yellow dog* Grade 1^ CPH 

A newspaper story. Grade 1§ lv CPH 

The princess and the puma. \v AFB 

Psyche and the skyscraper. \v A.FB 

Shocks of doom. |r AFB 

Shoes, and Moment of victory. (bound together) lv APH 



The thing' s the play. 



AFB 



While the auto waits, fr AFB 

Whirligigs, Selections from Grade If lv CPH 



HAND- COPIED BOOKS 



This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Unless 
otherwise indicated, these books are in Grade 2. 

How to locate hand-copied books in libraries: Following each title in this list 
you will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are the ab- 
breviations for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the libraries 
in which you will find the books. A key to these abbreviations, giving the names 
and addresser of each library is included in every January and June issue, 

Anderson, Maxwell. Anne of the thousand days. 2v 19U8 Cleveland 

A play about Anne Boleyn from the time Henry VIII came to claim her to the day she 
awaited execution. 
Bailey, H. C. Save a rope. 3v 19U8 NY Guild Detective story 
Bard, Mary. The doctor wears three faces. Uv 1?U9 Philadelphia, LC. Recently 
added to Cleveland 



10. 



6v 19U8 MY Guild. Also 



Head of a traveler. Uv Grade ik 



Emotional problems of living. 8v 



A doctor's wife describes her marriage, its difficulties and disappointments. 
Both amusing and practical, she offers her formula for transcending that bane 
of every doctor's wife, the medical meeting. 

Baruch, Dorothy, and Montgomery, Elizabeth. You. (Health and Personal Development 
Series .) 2v LC 
\j Bonner, Charles. The last romantic. 5v 19U9 LC Recently added, NY Guild 

A novel about three maladjusted young people in the 1930' s, embellished with news- 
paper-city room clamor and ideological undercurrents. 

Burt, K. N. Lady in the tower. $v Detroit 

Carnegie, Dale. How to stop worrying and start living, 
available as Talking Book 
Suggestions for overcoming the worry habit. 

Day-Lewis, Cecil (Nicholas Blake, pseudonym). 
19U9 NYPL Mystery ytory 

Easy ways to good meals . lv NY Guild 

Ninety-nine dishes mads with canned soups. 
. English, 0. Spurgeon, and Pearson, Gerald H. J 
19U5 NY Guild 

An introductory textbook intended for medical students, teachers, social workers, 
and others working in the field of interpersonal relations. 

Evans, Evan. The border bandit. Uv 1926 NY Guild Western novel 

Fontaine, Robert. The happy time. Uv 19U3> Chicago Recently added, Cleveland 
Twenty-four sketches — gay recollections of a few years in a boy' s life as part 
of a charming family in Ottawa, Canada. 

Gordon, James M. S. Escape from Vermont. Uv Grade 1§ 19U8 NY Guild 

Written with wit and sophistication of an adult who reminisces. Describes mem- 
ories in a household dominated by the author's grandfather, 

Hedrick, U. P. The land of the crooked tree. 7v Grade lj 19U8 NY Guild Also 
available as Talking Book 

In 187U the author's family moved to the newly opened Indian lands of lewer Mich- 
igan. These chapters are the author's recollection of life among the Sench 
Canadians and Ottawa Indians with whom the trappers had intermarried. 

Heyerdahl, Thor. Kon-Tikij across the Pacific by raft, translated by F. H. Lyon. 
Uv 1950 NYPL Also available as Talking Book 

The author and five others built a raft based on primitive models and set off 
across the Pacific Ocean. The book is an exciting account of that voyage. 

LaRamee, Louise de (Ouida, pseudonym). The Nuremberg stove, lv NYPL 
Classic children's favorite. 

Latin text: Gellius, Aulus. Noctes atticaej edited by George Herbert Nail. 2v 
Student Library, NYPL 

Latin text : Scudde- , Jared W. Second year Latin. Uv 19U5 Student Library, NYPL 

Life insurance questions and answers, lv Cleveland 

Meader, Stephen W. The will to win and other s tories. Uv Cleveland 
Twelve short stories for boys. 

Nath Ghose, Sudhindra. And gazelles leaping. Uv Grade lj 19U9 NY Guild 

Peale, Norman Vincent. The art of living. 3v 19U9 Sacramento. Recently added, LC 

Priestly, James B. An inspector calls. 2v 19U5 LC Recently added, NY Quild 
A play 
■ Readers Digest Association. A business of your own. lv Cleveland 

Roosevelt, Eleanor. This I remember. 7v 19U9 NY Guild Also available as Talking 
Book 

The second volume of Eleanor Roosevelt' s autobiography. It begins before Frank- 
lin Delano Roosevelt's first term as governor and ends shortly after his death. 



11. 

Sedges, John, pseudonym, The long love. 5v 19U9 NY Guild 

The story of a long and happy marriage between two people of dissimilar back- 
grounds and temperaments. The scene is New England ; the time, the last forty 
years. 

Spanish text: Vega Carpio, Lope Felix 4e. Four plays. Uv Student Library, NTPL 
Contents: Vol* 1, Amar sin saber a ([uiehj Vol. 2, El mejor Alcalde, el reyj Vol. 
3> El caballero de Olmedo; Vol. h f Peribanez y el Comendador de Ocana. 



» 







BRAILLE BOOK :REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 



Volume 21 



April 1952 



No. U 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y, 



• 



Braille Edition Provided by the U. S. Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the Editor, Diva Agostinelli 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



• 



CON TEN TS 
April 19S2 

PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

TALKING BOOKS 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MARK TWAIN 
From "American Authors, 1600-1900" 

EDWIN ARLINGTON ROBINSON 
Prom "Twentieth Century Authors" 

HAND-COPIED BOOKS 



• 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, April 1952 



• 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Govern- 
ment unless otherwise noted. Copies of these Government-supplied books are placed 
in the twenty-eight regional libraries which serve the blind. Readers are required 
to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of Congress to serve 
their respective territories. A list of these libraries and their territories ap- 
pears regularly in the January and June numbers of the magazine. 

In the list which follows, the Dook notations are based on information appear- 
ing in the "Book Review Digest" and other standard reference works, 

' Andrews, Roy Chapman. Heart of Asia; true tales of the Far East. 2v 1951 BIA 
The author is a scientist-explorer who discovered dinosaur eggs in the Gobi 
desert. The book contains twelve stories based on his own experiences but also 
on stories heard from others. Mr. Andrews knows and loves this harsh barren land 
and he likes and respects its people. 

Barker, Shirley. Rivers parting. Uv 1950 APH 

Historical novel set in seventeenth century England and New Hampshire. John 
Scarlock leaves his farm in Nottingham to settle in America. He becomes a re- 
spected citizen and upholder of the royalist cause. His son goes to England, 
marries and returns to New Hampshire but his wife cannot accept life in the col- 
onies. When she returns to London, Will marries a childhood sweetheart. Reviews 
mixed . 

Bellamann, Katherine. The Hayvens of Demaret. 3v 1951 APH 

A rather thin, historical novel about Jeffrey and Noel Hayven who were twins and 
devoted to each other. Jeffrey stayed at home to manage the family plantation 
while Noel went soldiering. When Noel returned from Mexico in 18U7 his brother's 
beautiful wife fell in love with him. 

Castle, Annette R., compiler. Book list for young people; a list of the titles 
available in braille and on Talking Book records, of books suggested for high 
school reading by the American Library Association, National Council of Teachers 
of English, and the Catalog for High School Libraries, lv 1951 APH (Not a 
/ publication of the U. S. Government) 
v Ford, Leslie, pseudonym. Murder is the pay-off. 3v 1950 BIA Detective story 

Forester, Cecil Scott. Randall and the river of time. 3v 1950 APH 

The first in a series of books about a young English inventor. While on leave 
during World War I, Randall is trapped into marriage by an unscrupulous woman. 
When his wife 1 s lover is killed by a fall from a window, Randall is accused of 
murder. Randall hopes to prove his innocence and go to America. Reviews gener- 
ally favorable. 

Gaines, Diana. Dr. Logan's wife. 3v 1951 CPH 

Character study of a pampered young woman, married to a man who was older than 
she and determined to shelter her. The love of a young scientist, her husband's 
death and psychoanalysis all help her to grow up. Mixed reviews. 

Hart, Virginia (Val). The story of American roads. 2v 1950 APH 

A well-written account of the high spots of road building in North America, from 
the white man' s use of Indian trails to the super highways of today. 
VHoyt, Adelia M. Unfolding years, lv 1950 HP 

Autobiography of one prominent in work for the blind. Miss Hoyt pioneered in 
the organization of hand transcribing services for the blind. 

James, Will, Sand. 3v 1929 APH (Not a publication of the U. S. Government) 

The story of a young man's regeneration parallels that of the capture and "gentling 11 
of a wild black stallion. 



3. 



u 



The great march. 2v Grade If APH (Not a publication of the 



Lurie, Rose Gamoran. 
U. S. Government) 
Fost biblical stories about Jewish history and biography. 

/ Marquand, John P. Haven's end. 3v 1933 APH 

A beautiful centuries -old New England house is the scene of an auction, The 
story then goes back into history to recount the story of the feud between the 
Swales and the Scarlets which ends with a marriage between two young descendants 
of each family. Essentially a drama of moods, and an allegory of the struggle 
y between aristocrats and "self-made men." 

i/Mar shall, Edison. The Viking. Uv 1951 CPH 

This is a varied brew of adventure and fantasy, history and legend, romance and 
poetry. The story tells of Ogier the Dane, of his love for the Welsh princess 
Morgana, and of their voyage to the land of Avalon (America). Mixed reviews. 
>/ Orr, William W. Can high school young people think? lv 1952 APH (Not a public a- 
tion of the U* S. Government) 

l/Quenton, Patrick* The follower. 3v 1950 NIB Panda #lU2 Price 3s9d per volume. 
Available NYPL (Not a publication of the U. S. Government) 
A suspense story with a New York and Mexico setting. 

I/Roark, Garland (George Garland, pseudonym). Doubtful valley i 3v 195l APH 

A better, than average Western full of action, a mystery and a more than usual 
interesting love story. 

■"Schoonover, Lawrence. The golden exile. 5v 195l APH 

Fast paced popular historical fiction* The story centers about Guy de Brunne 
who was exiled from thirteenth century England by an unscrupulous abbot who had 
his eye on Guy's newly inherited estates. Guy was not to return as long as water 
flowed downhill. Guy's search for a river that flowed uphill makes up the body 
of the novel. 
Tunis, John R. High Pockets. 2v 19U8 APH (Not a publication of the U. S. Govern- 
ment. 

High Pockets, a naive young fielder from the bush leagues, is an unpopular member 
of the Dodger team because of his selfish and self-centered attitude. How he is 
straightened out by an automobile accident involving a young boy forms the main 
/ plot. Good reviews. 

^Webber, Gordon. Years of Eden. 2v 1950 BIA 

Poetic recording of the incidents in the adolescent years of a Michigan farm boy. 
The time is the 1920' s. Reviews good. 
Wouk, Herman. The Caine mutiny, a novel of infer Id War II. 8v 1951 APH 

Willie Keith, a Princeton graduate, rises from midshipman to captain of an ancient 
minesweeper, the Caine. He also woos and wins a pretty nightclub singer. Re- 
views generally favorable. 



u 



J 



TALKING BOOKS 



Allen, T, D. Doctor in buckskin. l6r 1951 APH Read by Milton Metz 

A historical novel which recreates the zeal and enthusiasm which Marcus Whitman 
« brought withhim as a pioneer medical missionary to the Willamette Valley of Oregon. 
y Bartlett, Arthur. Baseball and Mr. Spalding; the history and romance of baseball. 
I6r^ 1951 APH Read by Paul Clark 

A life of Albert G. Spalding who started as a poor boy, became a baseball player 
and finally turned the sport of baseball into a business. 
•/Craig, Lillian. The singing hills. 13r 1951 APH Read by Terry Hayes Sales. 
A lively account of the author's experiences among the Virginia mountaineers. 
She was often in danger because of her interest in all their ways— their moonshin- 



N 



t 



" ■ u. 

ing activities, especially —but her quick wit and courage and the real friends she 
made saved her f 
/Furnas, J. C. Voyage to windward; the life of Rohert Louis Stevenson. 36r 1951 
AFB Read by Kermit Murdock 

A straightforward chronological account, not without interpretation, but with a 
steadfast attempt for honesty in controversial matters. Reviews favorable. 

, Goodspeed, Edgar J. A life of Jesus, lip 1950 APH Read by Milton Met* 
Mr. Goodspeed is among the best known of American Biblioal scholars. 

-flay cox, Ernest. By rope and lead. lOr 19U9 APH Read by Livingston Gilbert 
A oolleriion of nine tight, exciting sto»ies of the old West. 

"McCloy, Helen, Alias Basil Willing. lOr 1951 AFB Read by John Brewster 
Detective story 

'Marquand, John P. Melville Goodwin, U. S. A. 36r 195l AFB Read by Alexander 
Scourby 

Sidney Skelton is a famous radio commentator. The "integrity" of his voice has 
brought him a national audience, a wealthy sponsor, an estate in Connecticut, 
an ambitious wife.. .The trouble is, Sid knows, Melville Goodwin, a two-star gener- 
al who has become newsworthy through his behavior with a Russian patrol in Berlin* 
The Army needs a hero to compete with the other branches of the armed forces, 
and Sid is in the position of protecting the general from making a fool of him- 
self. In the prooess Sidney's true character is revealed* 

.Myers, Henry, The utmost island. 17r 195l AFB Read by John Brewster 

A novel of Lief Erickson and of Iceland in the tenth oentury. The clash of the 
ancient mytology with the new Christian religion gives impetus to the expedition 
to "Vinland across the Western Sea." 

J Oliver, Douglas L. The Pacific islands. 2Ur 195l APH Read by Walter Gerard 

A summary of the history and the economic and social life of the peoples who have 
inhabited the Pacific islands from pre-histori« days to the present. 
/ Willcox, William B. Star of Empire j a study of Britain as a world power, lk85-19U5. 
30r 1950 APH Read by William Gladden 
An interpretation of the forces that molded modern Britain. Well written. 

LOUIS BRAILLE 

The "New Outleok for the Blind" has devoted its March 1952 issue to a biographi- 
cal study of Louis Braille, in honor of the centennial of his death. The slightly 
condensed translation from the original French of "The Reading Fingers j the Life 
of Louis Braille, 1809-1852" by Jean Roblin makes up the entire issue. 

WHAT EVERY BLIND PERSON SHOULD KNOW 

Under this general title, a series of pamphlets is being issued by the American 
Foundation for the Blind on topics of interest to blind persons. The first two 
titles in this series are: "Life Insurance for the Blind" and "Travel Concessions 
for the Blind." These pamphlets are available in inkprint only. The price of each 
pamphlet is ten eents. Either coins or stamps may aooompany orders which should be 
addressed to the American Foundation for the Blind, 15 West l6th Street, New York 11, 
New York, 



5. 



MARK TWAIN 
From "American Authors, 1600-1900" 



Samuel Langhorne Clemens ("Mark Ttoain") (November 30, 1835— April 21, 1910), 
novelist, essayist, and travel writer, was born in Florida, Missouri, the son of 
John Marshall Clemens, a visionary lawyer and landowner from Virginia, and Jane 
(Lampton) Clemens. When he was five, the family, which was always on the move, went 
to Hannibal, Missouri, and in 18U7 the father died there. This put an end to the 
boy 1 s very elementary schooling, and he was apprenticed to his brother Orion, who 
ran a country paper, the "Missouri Courier." In 1853 Clemens set out for the East 
as a journeyman printer, getting as far as New York and Philadelphia, and ending 
back in Keokuk, Iowa, where Orion was publishing another paper. After an abortive 
start to South America, he became, in 1857, an apprentice pilot on the Mississippi, 
and remained on the river, as apprentice and journeyman pilot, until the Civil War. 

For about two weeks he was a second lieutenant in the Confederate Army (all the 
rest of his family being staunch Unionists); but he managed to be mustered out for 
undescribed "disabilities," and again joined Orion, who had been appointed secretary 
of the territory of Nevada. Samuel Clemens went along as his brother's secretary, 
but finding he had neither duties nor salary, he became an unsuccessful prospector, 
then a reporter in Carson City, the capital of Nevada. By 1862 he was city editor 
of the Virginia City, Nevada "Enterprise," and in his work for this paper he first 
used the familiar pseudonym "Mark Twain," a depth call of the Mississippi pilots. 
A meeting with Charles Farrar Browne ("Artemus Ward") first aroused his literary am- 
bitions, but his earliest work was the crudest sort of humor, consisting mostly of 
hoaxes and tall stories. 



t 



A farcical duel, arising out of the personal journalism then the style, caused 
his exit from Nevada. He went to San Francisco in I86I4. and joined the staff of the 
" Morning Call," though he wrote also for the "Golden Era" and the "Alta California." 
More important, he met Bret Harte, the first purely literary figure he had ever 
known. The next year his story of "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," 
first published in a New York newspaper, made him a nationally famous humorist over- 
night — though he himself, and justly, did not think highly of it. The Sacramento 
"Union" sent him to Hawaii (then known as the Sandwich Islands) to write travel 
sketches, and when he returned the paper assigned him to go around the world and send 
letters on his journey. Instead, as soon as he reached New York, he joined a party 
traveling on the "Quaker City" to the Mediterranean and Palestine. 

This tour was the crucial point in Mark Twain' s career. The book which grew from 
it, "Innocents Abroad," established him solidly as a writer, and through it he met 
Olivia Langdon, daughter of a wealthy Elmira, New York family, and fell in love: 
first with her picture, then with her. They were married in 1870. Clemens had al- 
ready bought a part interest in the Buffalo "Express," and edited it from 1869 t* 
1871, when he moved to Hartford, his home until 1891. 

His brain always hot with schemes, he lost the fortune earned by his books in 
backing an impractical typesetting machine; then in 188U he invested in the Charles 
L. Webster Company, a publishing house which made enormous profits from its sales of 
Grant's "Memoirs," but gradually failed and went completely bankrupt in 189U, leav- 
ing Clemens penniless. Like Scott before him, he dedicated himself to paying his 
debts and regaining his standing financially. This he triumphantly accomplished by 
means of a world lecture tour in 1895 and 1896. But it was a bitter victory, for 
during his absence his best loved child, his daughter Susie, died. 

From this time on Mark Twain' s life was a strange compound of public glory and 



6. 



t 



private tragedy. He lived abroad most of the time, for several years in a villa in 
Florence. His adored wife died in 190U. his daughter, Jean in 1909, leaving "him 
(since his only son had died in infancy) but one daughter, Clara, who married the 
pianist Ossip Qabrilowitsch . Honors were heaped upon him} Yale had given him an 
M. A. degree in 1888 and followed it with an LL.D. in 1901, the University of Miss- 
ouri did the same in 1902j but the proudest moment of his life was when Oxford con- 
ferred the same degree on him in 1907* He was so proud of his scarlet doctor's 
gown from Oxford that he wore it at his daughter's wedding. In his last years he 
built a house, "Stormfield," at Redding, Connecticut, and there he dies of angina 
pectoris, as he had supers titiously expeoted, when Halley' s Comet — which had herald- 
ed his birth — came round again. 

Few more complex natures than his have ever lived, or few concerning whom tliere 
are so many contradictory opinions. Van Wyck Brooks sees him as the victim of the 
Puritanism of the East, embodied in his wife, the frustrated pioneer whose rebellion 
was all subconscious. To Bernard DeVoto he is the free, untrammeled pioneer, his 
very defects turned into virtues as the voice of the liberty -loving and democratic 
West. As a matter of fact, the truth about Mark Twain seems to be that though his 
mind grew up, his heart remained always that of a child. Hot-tempered, profane, 
wreathed in tobacco smoke, enthralled by games and gadgets, extravagant, sentimental 
superstitious, chivalrous to the point of the ridiculous— he was all these things. 
This was Samuel Clemens, the boy who is most of Tom Sawyer; the young roughneck in 
Nevada and California; the man who shocked the smug Boston hierarchy by his incred- 
ible gaffe at the dinner to Whittier; the passionate defender of Harriet Shelley and 
Joan of Arc; the bitter enemy of Christian Science; the man who meekly let his wife 
edit the life out bf his manuscripts; the libertarian who nevertheless chosw as his 
dearest friend a multi-millionaire and the most reactionary of capitalists; the 
Rationalist whose next dearest friend was a clergyman; the great show-piece of the 
latter years who reigned like a king in pomp and innocent vanity, whose lightest 
word was eagerly sought and as eagerly given. 

But besides this Samuel Clemens there was Mark Twain, a conscious artist who grew 
to resent his fame as a humorist, who alternated garrulity with taciturnity, who was 
as deeply dyed a pessimist as the world has ever seen, an apostle of cynicism and 
despair as truly as was Swift. Much of the writing in this vein never saw the light 
until he was near his death, though penned long before; most of it never passed 
Olivia's hawklike eye. ^t it must never be forgotten that Clemens, who was so out- 
spoken and aggressive in some ways, had little power of self-criticism and was un- 
usually dependent on guidance and approval to work at all. If his wife had not been 
his censor, he would have found another. It is true that he made a conscious effort 
to assimilate himself to the purse-proud "refined" society which was his later en- 
vironment; he knew very well that he would never be accepted as actually one of the 
genteel, but he tried. Exceedingly impressionable, he could not help being influ- 
enced by those with whom he was thrown, from William Dean Howells, who had undergone 
something of the same transformation, to the Standard Oil magnate, H. H. Rogers. 
This being a©, how every much more he must inevitably have been influenced by the 
woman he worshipped — a woman who, without any marked talent of her own, nevertheless 
loved -him and did her best to make him over into the kind of man her family and 
friends would approve. 

This inner struggle — a frustration more of his own making than enforced from the 
outside— is the root of his nostalgia for the past. We should be grateful for it, 
for it gave us "Tom Sawyer," "life on the Mississippi," and "Huckleberry Finn." If 
Mark Twain had stayed in the South or the West, he might be classed now with Artemus 



7* 



Ward or Josh Billings, a half-forgotten humorist. As it wis, "there was too much 
virility in him (remarks Edward Wagenknecht) for him to permit himself to be pushed 
very far from his native bent." And since, to quote his official biographer, Albert 
Bigelow Paine, he "lived curiously apart from the actualities of life," in a sort 
of dream world, the nature of his dreams was important to posterity. The "Jumping 
Frog," the crude "Roughing It," the self-righteous "Innocents Abroad," are hardly 
readable today, but while the English language lasts, Huck and Nigger Jim will drift 
down the Mississippi, Tom will cajole the other boys into whitewashing the fence for 
him. That hawklike figure with the bushy brows, the drooping mustache, the red hair 
turned to grey curls, garbed all in white as if for the tropics, concealed a lazy 
genius, a vain genius, often a credulous genius, but always a genius. 

A word more must be said on Mark Twain's style. It must be remembered always 
that for many years he was a lecturer, that he was always a talker. He wrote as 
he talked, for the ear more than for the eye. His cadence is the cadence of speech. 
It is a style at its best almost inimitable. It is very like the speaking style of 
Lincoln, and Howells said more than he knew when he called Clemens "the Lincoln of 
our literature." 

Editor's note: Among the author's works the following are in braille or Talking 
Book form j 

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. £v Grade lj- APH 

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. 19r AFB 

Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Uv Grade 1% APH 

Adventures of Tom Sawyer. 13r 1938 APH 

Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. 

Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. 

Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. 

The Gilded Age. £v BIA 

Innocents Abroad. 6v APH 

Life on the Mississippi, Uv BIA 

Life on the Mississippi. 28r APH 

Love Letters of Mark Twain, f>v CPH 

Man Who Corrupted Hadleyburg. lv Grade 1§ APH 

The Man Who Corrupted Hadleyburg, and a Double-barrelled Detective Story 7r AFB 

Mark Twain in Eruption* Hitherto Unpublished Pages About Men and Events; edited 
with an introduction by Bernard DeVoto. 3v APH 

The Mysterious Stranger, and other stories, 2v BIA 

The Mysterious Stranger, 7r APH 

Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc, Uv Grade ij CPH 

Roughing It. Uv BIA 

Roughing It. Vol. 1, $v APH 

Roughing it. Vol. 2. l£r APH 

Selected Short Stories. l8r AFB 

A selection of short stories by various authors includes the following short 
stories by Samuel L. Clemens: Canvasser's Tale; Celebrated Jumping Frog of 
Calaveras County; Great Deadwood Mystery; Great Revolution in Pitcairn; 
How I Escaped Being Killed in a Duel, 

The Tragedy of Puddinhead Wilson, and Tnose Extraordinary Twins, lUr APH 

About Mark Twain: 



Uv Grade lj 
Uv APH 
2Ur APH 



APH 



Mason, Miriam E. Mark Twain; boy of old Missouri (Childhood of Famous Americans 
Series) lv . 19U2 APH- (Not a publication of. the U. S. Government) 



8. 

Paine, Albert Bigelow. Boys' life of Mark Twain. 3v Grade lj APH 
Proudfit, Isabel. River boy. 2v APH 

Proudfit, Isabel. River boy. 8r 19U0 APH Read by James Walton 
Wagenknecht, Edward. Mark Twain j the man and his work. 3v BIA 

OPPORTUNITIES f€R THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED 

This is the title of a new inkprint pamphlet published by the United States 
Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. The booklet is intended to acquaint its read- 
ers with the progress which has been made toward eliminating public misconceptions 
about blindness, and to help its readers understand the opportunities which are open 
to blind persons. The pamphlet is available through your state agency for rehabilita- 
tion of the blind. 



t 



EDWIN ARLINGTON ROBINSON 
Prom "Twentieth Century Authors" 

Edwin Arlington Robinson (December 22, 1869-April 6, 1935), American poet, was 
born in Head Tide, Maine, When he was six months old the family moved to Gardiner, 
Maine, the "Tillbury Town" of his poems and the home of all his youth. He was a 
precocious child, who wrote Verse from the age of eleven. He went to Harvard, but 
in his sophomore year hie father died, the family fortune was dissipated under the 
inexperienced charge of his brother, and after a year of struggling to earn his way, 
he gave up college in 1893 and went home to Gardiner. He suffered at this time from 
chronic mastoiditis, which eventually made him deaf in one ear. The two years he 
spent at home, however, were not unhappy; he had poetry to write, his violin and 
clarinet to play, and his relatives and the friends of his boyhood about him. In 
1896 his mother died, and he went to New York to live. He returned to Gardiner only 
three times--for the funerals of his two brothers, and in 1925 when he received a 
Litt.D. degree from Bowdoin College. 

In New York Robinsort gradually grew into the melancholy taciturn hermit of legend. 
His first little volumes made no stir, and he refused all his life to do hack writ- 
ing or to live on the edges of literature. He was practically unknown until he was 
fifty. He worked at what he could get, being at one time a subway inspector. What 
little publication he achieved was for the most part in England, and American critics, 
when they noticed him at all, supposed he was an Englishman. In 1905 Tneodore Roose- 
velt became interested in his work, and gave him a job in the New York Custom House, 
but he resigned in 1909. In spite of debts and the difficulty of earning a living, 
he was a poet and could live by no other means. 

It was the MacDowell Colony, in Peterborough, N. H. that emancipated him. There 
he spent most of the rest of his life, though New York saw him often and Boston oc- 
casionally. He was the MacDowell Colony's "acknowledged deity," and. legends grew 
up about him as his fame spread. For the last ten or fifteen years of his life he 
shared with Robert Frost the reputation of being America's greatest living poet. He 
was not an ea$y person to knowj he "distrusted most men and feared almost all women." 
Celibate, a periodical alcoholic, a man "obsessed by failure and in love with death," 
he yet held firmly to the few close friends he had made in youth, and with them he 
could be expansive and witty. His tall, thin figure, with its curiously puckered 
mouth, burning dark eyes hidden by spectacles, and long sensitive hands, was compact 
of guarded reticence and and shrinking from the world, "His talk, like his expres- 



9i 

sion, was colorless," remarked Louis Untermeyer. "All the color was in his verse 1*1 
He identified himself with all those who, like their creator, had been frustrated 
and beaten by the current standards of commercial success," And the "New Republic," 
in an obituary notice, said that for Robinson "poetry played the part of wife, 
children, job, and recreation." He died in New York of cancer of the stomach, at 
the age of sixty-five. 



Editor 1 s note: 
Book form : 



Among the author' s works the following are in braille or Talking 



Ben Jonson Entertains a Man from Stratford. 3/Ur 1936 AFB (Recorded with 

•"William Shakespeare^"" a#d "Julius Caesar") 
Captain Craig, handcopied Sacramento 
Cavender' s House lv handcopied LC, Chicago 
The Glory of the Nightingales Chicago 
Lancelot 5r 1938 APH 

Nicodemus handcopied NYPL and Sacramento 
Selected Readings from the Collected Poems lr 1937 AFB 
Tristram }v handcopied St. Louis, Detroit, NYPL, LC, and Seattle 
Tristram 7r 1937 AFB 



• 



HAND-COPIED BOOKS 

This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Unless 
otherwise indicated, these books are in Grade 2. 

How to locate hand-copied books in libraries: Following each title in this list 
you will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are the ab- 
breviations for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the libraries 
in which you will find the books. A key to these abbreviations, giving the names 
and addresses of each library is included in every January and June issue. 

/Sperry, Armstrong. Call it courage, lv 19U0 Cleveland 

Juvenile fiction awarded Newberry Medal for 19Ul 
/Steele, Max. Debby. 5v 1950 LC 

A character study of a mentally arrested woman. Debby' s story is told from the 
, age of 35 when she is taken from prison to serve as a maid in the Merrill home, 

until years later she dies in the bosom of her "adopted" family. Reviews mixed. 
Steiner, Rudolf. The gospel of St. Mark, ten lectures delivered in Basel, September 

15-2U, 1912 j translated by ©ma McArthur. Uv 1950 NYPL 
Tharp, Louise H. The Peabody sisters of Salem. 8v 1950 LC Also available as 

Talking Book 

The combined biographies of the three Peabody sisters of nineteenth century Salem. 

They were Elizabeth, who never married, but was called the "grandmother" of Bos- 
ton, founder of the American kindergarten; Mary, a teacher who became the second 

wife of the famed educator, Horace Mann; and Sophie, artist, reputed invalid, and 

wife of Nathaniel Hawthorne.. Reviews good. 
Upham, Frances, Dynamic approach to illness. 3v 19U9 NY Guild 
Van Passsen, Pierre. Why Jesus died? Uv 19U9 NY Guild 

A biographical study which is in disagreement with the strictly scriptural version. 

Controversial in nature, the book is sure to stimulate thought and reflection, 
Walsh, Ihomas. Nightmare in Manhattan. Uv 1950 Detroit 

The story of a kidnapping in Westchester which terminated in the capture of the 

gang leader in a New York City railroad station. 



10. 



T 



• 



Warburg, James Paul. Faith, purpose and power; a plea for a positive policy. Uv 
1950 LC 

The author states that the purpose of this book is to show that the alternative 
to "panic-inspired, negative policy 41 is neither "appeasement" nor talking to the 
Russians, but an affirmative leadership toward peace. 

Webster, Hutton. Early European civilization. 3v 1935 Student Library, HYPL 

Werbel, Bernard 0. General insurance outline. 9v 19h3 Studdnt Library, NYPL 

Winwar, Frances. The immortal lovers; Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, a 
biography. 5v Grade 3 1898 NYPL Classic biography of the famous poets. 

Zilahy, Lajos. The Dukays; translated from the Hungarian by John Pauker. 19v 19U9 
NYPL 
Family chronicle of the aristocratic Hungarian Dukays. The time is 1868 to 1939. 

Yates, Elizabeth. Amos Fortune, free man. 2v 1950 NYPL Juvenile fiction 

Algren, Nelson. The man with the golden arm. 8v 19U9 NY Guild 

A realistic story about the wretched, confused and hopelessly warped characters 
spawned in Chicago's underworld. The chief character is - Frankie Machine, an ex- 
veteran with a Purple Heart and a Good Conduct Medal, and the "golden arm" which 
serves him in his occupation as card dealer. Reviews favorable. 

^American Public Health Association. The control of communicable diseases in man; 
an official report. 5v 1950 NYPL 

Best, Charles H., and Taylor, N. B. The human body and its functions. 7v 19l±8 
NYPL An elementary textbook of physiology 

Brooke, Esther E. You and your personality; a guide to effective living, yj 19U9 
NY Guild 
An established career counselor discusses personality building. 

Cooper, Louise Field. The boys from Sharon. Uv 1950 NY Guild 

Lucius and George, two little boys from Sharon, Connecticut, spend a week with 
an elderly relative who lives in a small New England university town, along with 
their hostess' brother and niece. The niece falls in love with a university pro- 
fessor and the aunt is much opposed. Delicate and light satire, well written. 
Favorable reviews. 

Dalgliesh, Alice. The silver pencil. 3v 19hh NYPL 

A story about a young girl's efforts to become a writer. Will appeal to teen aged 
girls especially. 

Delmar, Vina. About Mrs. Leslie. 6v 1950 NY Guild 

The scene of this novel is a Beverly Hi lis, California rooming house. In the course 
of one day, the owner loses all her roomers. Flashbacks of the lives of Mrs. 
Leslie and her roomers are given showing why that particular day was a turning 
point in several lives. Reviews mixed. 

Dotson, Carrol B. The Newspaper Institute of America 'handbook for writers. 17v NYPL 

Faulkner, William. The sound and the fury. 7v 1929 NY Guild, recently added 
Detroit 

Tne first of Faulkner's novels written in his cryptic stream of consciousness. The 
narrative deals with the degenerate Compton family, once distinguished aristocrats. 
The story is told through three separate types of stream of consciousness repre- 
senting three characters. Tne final part of the story is told objectively. 

Fisher, Anne Benson. It's a wise child; a disorderly comedy of fatherhood. Uv 
19U9 NY Guild 

A story of rogues and harlots in Monterey. When her mother dies in childbirth, 
Donna becomes an object of interest to many and changes the way of life of some, 
notably Conchita. With the help of four men each of whom might have been Donna's 
father, Conchita raises Donna and eventually arranges a happy marriage for her. 
Reviews mixed. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 



Volume 21 



May 19$2 



No, 5 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the U, S, Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the Editor, Diva Agostinelli 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 






CONTENTS 
May 1#2 



A 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

TALKING BOOKS 

BIBLE READINGS IN BRAILLE 

WALT WHITMAN 
From "American Authors, 1600»1900" 

HAND«COPIED BOOKS 



• 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, May 1952 
PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Feder- 
al Government unless otherwise noted. Copies of these Government-supplied 
books are placed in the twenty-eight regional libraries which serve the 
blind. Readers are required to borrow books from the library designated 
by the Library of Congress to serve their respective territories, A list 
of these libraries and their territories appears regularly in the January 
and June numbers of the magazine. 

In the list which follows, the book notations are based on informa- 
tion appearing in the "Book Review Digest" and other standard reference 
works , 

Andersen, Hans Christian, Fairy tales, kv 1°U6 APH 

New edition with an introduction by May^liamberton Becker. 
Bridge, Ann, pseudonym. The dark moment, 5v 1952 CPH 

A novel based on the rise of modern Turkey. Aristocratic Feride and an 
English girl, Fanny Price, were enduring friends. Feride' s marriage 
to an aide of Mustafa Kemal was a happy one, but Fanny's love for Kemal 
led to a drastic decision. 
Brown, John Mason, Still seeing things, 3v 1950 APH 

The third in the author *s series of essays on dramatic criticisms, and 
various other papers, all of which first appeared in the "Saturday Review 
of Literature." 
Brown, Margery F, Over a bamboo fencej an American looks at Japan, 3v 
1951 CPH 

The author, the wife of a T /est Point colonel, describes her life in 
Japan during the twenty-one months she and her family lived there. The 
book neither romanticizes nor caricatures the Japanese but sees them as 
people whose customs differ from ours, 
Cammann, Schuyler, The land of the camel; tents and temples of inner Mongolia. 
3v 1951 BIA 

Toward the end of the war the author was sent to a United States meteor- 
ological outpost in inner Mongolia. During his stay there, he made many 
side trips from the base camp. This book describes his observations on 
the land and the people. 
Chevigny, Hector and Braverman, Sydell, The adjustment of the blind, 3v 
1950 HP 

Publication of this book marks the most cogent single contribution to 
the field of work f or t he blind since 1933, when Cutsforth's "The Blind 
in School and Society" made its appearance. 
Clemens, Samuel L, (Mark Twain, pseudonym) Adventures of Tom Sawyer. 3v 
19U6 APH 

A new edition of an olid classic with an introduction by May Lamberton 
Becker. 
De La Roche, Mazo, Renny's daughter, Uv 1951 APH 

A sequel to "Return to Jalna>" this book concerns Renny's eighteen year 
old daughter. On a trip to Ireland, the daughter falls in love with an 
impoverished Irishman, and on returning to Canada finds an unexpected 
ally in her father. 
Donahue, Wilma and Dabelstein, Donald, editors. Psychological diagnosis and 
counseling of the adult blind, 3v 1950 APH 

Selected papers from the proceedings of the University of Michigan Con- 
ference for the Blind, 19^7. 



Evans, Evan, pseudonym. Strange courage. 3v 1930 GPH Western story. 

Harper, Martha B. Winter wedding, 3v 1950 BIA 

Historical novel for older girls. The time is just after the Civil 

War, and the story is about the experiences and romance of a young school 

teacher. 

Holbrook, Stewart H. The Yankee exodusj an account of migration from New 
England. 6v 1950 APH 

A popular history of the westward migrations of Yankees from all the New 
England states. The movement began as early as the last years of the 
eighteenth century and continued into the twentieth. 

Household, Geoffrey. A rough shoot, lv 1951 APH 

A spy and chase adventure story set in the small English town of Dorset. 

Jeffries, Graham M. (Peter Bourne, pseudonym) The golden road. 5v 1951 APH 
An adventure story relating the experiences of a young Bostonian in Pana- 
ma during the l850 ! s when the Panama Railroad was being built at enormous 
cost of lives and money. 

Kennedy, Margaret. Lucy Carmichael. iiv 1951 APH 

Lucy Carmichael, the heroine of this novel set in present day England, 
goes about rebuilding her life after she has been deserted at the altar. 

MacDonald, Philip. R. I. P. 3v 1951 NIB Panda #1^3 Price 3s9d per 
volume. (Not a publication of the U, S» Government) 

One of the finest achievements of an author with a genius for the macabre. 
The atmosphere is almost intolerable suspense in a West Country mansion 
is sustained until the dramatic end. 

Maclnnes, Helen (Highet) Neither five nor three. 5v 1951 APH 

The story of the infiltration by the Communist Party of an influential 
popular magazine. 

Meader, Stephen Warren, River of the wolves. 2v 19U8 APH 

Dave Foster, while working on his uncles farm in Maine, is captured by 
Indians and carried away to Canada, After winter spent with the tribe, 
the boy and another captive, a girl, make their escape and find their 
way home. 

Nuttall, Madeleine. The gift. 2v 1951 BIA 

Character sketch of a modern town, with roots stretching back a hundred 
years, and of Pidgey, a loveable old gentleman who was a link between 
past and present. 

O'Brien, John Sherman, Silver chief to the rescue. 2v 1937 APH 
Dog story for young readers. 

Raine, William M. Jingling spurs, 3v 1950 BIA Western novel. 

Robertson, Constance (Noyes) The golden circle, 5v 1951 CPH 

A fast-paced historical novel set in Ohio in I863. The story centers 
about the arrest of Vallandigham, Confederate leader, his deportation 
across the Confederate lines and his dramatic reappearance on Ohio soil 
to run for governor. 

Santee, Ross. Hardrock and silver sage. 2v 1951 APH 

A novel about the Nolons, Pop, Toinmie and Robin, in the years around 1910. 
The scene us Arizona, and the gentle peace-loving father is a hardrock 
miner. 

Stevenson, Dorothy E. Music in the hills. 3v 1950 BIA 

Sequel to 'Vittoria Cottage." In this novel James Dering, after his de- 
mobilization, goes to the Scottish border farm of his aunt and uncle to 
learn farming and try to cure a broken heart. 

Tebbel, John W, The conqueror. 5v 1951 APH 

Historical novel based on the life of Sir William Johnson, British super- 
intendent-general of Indian affairs in North America. 



Thomas, A 'Kemp is. The imitation of Christ, translated from the Latin in- 
to modern English, 2v APH Published for t he Xavier Society for the 
Blind, l$k East 23rd Street, New York 10, N. Y. (Not a publication of 
the U, S, Government) 

Wilson, Charles M, The tropics: World of tomorrow, kv 1951 APH 

The world- importance of the tropics in sun-power and manpower is clearly 
demonstrated in this informative account of some of the most habitable 
remaining frontiers. 



TALKING BOOKS 

Aldridge, James. The hunter, liir 1951 APH Read by George Patterson 
The story of Roy MacNair, hunter and trapper from the Canadian wilds 
north of the Lake Huron. 

Annixter, Paul, drought to cover, llr 1951 APH Read by George Barnes 
Fifteen outdoor tales of action and adventure, 

Asimov, Isaac, The stars like dust c 13** 1951 APH Read by Kenneth Meeker 
A science fiction novel set in the Kingdom of the Horsehead Nebula. 

Barnes, Margaret C, With all my heart, 20r 1951 AFB Read by John Brewster 
Historical novel based on the life of Catherine of Braganza, convent bred 
Portuguese princess who married the notorious Gharles II of England. Over 
the years, Catherine's love became the most enduring and steadfast thing 
in the king's life. 

Boutcher, Esther P, Manowen. 21r 1951 AFB Read by John Brewster. 
A novel about fourteen year old Owen Gwynedd, who came north to live 
shortly after the Civil War, The story of Owen's growth into manhood 
is a framework on which the author hangs a treasury of Long Island folk- 
lore and history, 
v Burman, Ben Lucien. Children of Noah, 6r 1951 APH Read by Burt Blackwell 
Mr, Burman has been on another of his prospecting journeys into the re- 
gion he knows best— the Mississippi Valley— and has come back bearing a 
pack stuffed with gleaming nuggets. Here are narratives dealing with 
show boat thespians, shanty boat dwellers, Mississippi fishermen, and 
/ steamboaters. 
*' Carson, Rachel L, The sea around us, lljr 1951 APH Read by Milton Metz 
An effective little volume about the world's last frontier of mystery and 
darkness, the great oceans. 

Coburn, Katherine, The grandmothers, lljr 19l*9 AFB Read by Susan Douglas 
"Gran> n Ruth's Canadian grandmother, and "Babicka," Ruth's husband *a 
grandmother^ are the grandmothers of tb«3 litlo. Although. separated . 
t>7 thousands of miles in space and by differing customs and circumstances, 
the two grandmothers are strangely similar, 

Corle, Edwin* The Gilaj river of the Southwest, 2kc 1951 AFB Read by 
Alexander Scourby. 

Another volume in the Rivers of America Series, This one traces the 
history of this fabulous land of New Mexico and Arizona from the days of 
the dinosaur to the present-day dam building and land reclamation through 
irrigation. 
^Costain, Thomas B, The magnificent century. 2^r 1951 APH Read by Walter 
Gerard 

The second in the author's "The Pageant of England" series begins after 
the Magna Carta, and covers the reign of Henry III ending with his death 
in 1272, 



Davis j H, L. Winds of morning, 23r 1952 AFB Read by Jim Denver 

A novel about the contemporary American West. The scene is the middle 
Columbia River country about 1920. The chief characters are Amos Clarke, 
sheriffs assistant and Hendricks, an old horse herder with whom Amos 
travels into the wilderness. 

Fowler, Gene. Schnozzolaj the story of Jimmy Durante. 19r 1951 AFB Read 
by William Lazar 

A biography of Jimmy Durante which describes his career from the honky- 
tonk Coney Island days to the present. 

Frank, Waldo D. Birth of a worldj Bolivar in terms of his people, 36r 
1951 AFB Read by John Knight 

Commissioned by the Venezuelan government, this biography seeks to project 
our vision into the complex environmental factors which produced Simon 
Bolivar. 

Gardner, Earle Stanley, The chase of the angry mourner, llr 1951 AFB 
Read by William Lazar Detective story. 
, Hoyt, Adelia M, Unfolding years, l8r 1950 APH Read by Terry Hayes Sales 
Also available in Braille. 

Autobiography of one prominent in work for the blind. Miss Hoyt pioneered 
in the organization of hand transcribing services for the blind. 

Idell, Albert E, Stephen Hayne, 26r 1951 AFB Read by Jim Denver 

After the Civil War, Stephen Hayne returns to his Pennsylvania Dutch family. 
He took a job in a nearby coal mine, and rose quickly in the company. 
The story revolves about his conflicts with the Philadelphia interests, 
the importation of Irish men to work in the mines and of their fight 
against the mining interests. 

Johnson, Gerald W, This American people. 12r 1951 AFB Read by Carl Emory 
A series of essays on the fundamental meaning of democracy. 

Macfie, Harry, Wasa-wasaj a tale of trails and treasure in the far north. 
Translated from the Swedish by F a H Lyon. l?r 1951 AFB Read by John 
Cannon 
An account of twenty years 1 adventure in the far north. 

Marek, K, W, (Ceram, C, W,, pseudonym) Gods, graves and scholars. Trans- 
lated from the German by E, B, Carside, 27r 1951 AFB Read by Kermit 
Murdock 

A popular story and interpretation of the great archaeological discoveries 
of the last two centuries, and of the man who made the discoveries, 

Morgan, Charles, A breeze of morning. 13r 1951 AFB Read by Mercer Mcleod 
A romance of the early English 1900' s revolving about quiet Ann Harbrook, 
flighty Rose Letterby and Howard Treladdin. 

Raine, William MacLeod. Saddlebum. lljr 19U8 APH Read by Livingston Gilbert 
Western story, 

Roberts, Richard Emery, Star in the west, 17r 1951 AFB Read by Helen S 
Shields 

This novel of Arizona some forty years ago, is based on the life of the 
author's mother, 
v Smith, Dorothy E, 0, the brave music, 17r 1951 APH Read by Terry Hayes 
Sales 

A novel about Ruan Ashley, daughter of a non-conformist minister and a 
beautiful, high-spirited member of the aristocracy, which describes her 
life from the age of seven to her middle teens. 

Sorenson, Virginia, The proper gods, 25r 1951 APH Read by Livingston 
Gilbert 

Adam Savala, a Yaqui Indian, recently returned from service in World War II, 
decides to rejoin his family in Mexico, He had been brought up in Arizona, 
when the family lived exile, Adam struggles to readjust to the old, dig- 
nified way of his ancestors. 



Strombeck, J. F, So great salvation, 8r 19ii0 APH 

Published for Braille Circulating Library, 70i* West Grace Street, 
Richmond 20, Virginia. (Not a publication of the U, S, Government) 
'"'Thane, Elswyth (Mrs, William Beebe) This was tomorrow. l8r 1951 APH 
Read by Kenneth Meeker 
Continues the story of the Day-Sprague family, and ends about 1938. 

Thirkell, Angela. The duke f s daughter. 26r 1951 AFB Read by Carmen 
Mathews 

The latest chronicle of Barsetshire continues with the doings of the 
leading county families, but especially with Lady Cora, the Duke of 
Omnium • s daughter . 
. Trilling, Lionel. The liberal imagination; essays on literature and society. 
20r 1950 APH Read by Jean Clos 

A collection of essays in literary criticism. The subjects are diverse 
and the level of writing high. Some of the topics treated are: liter- 
ary trends, art and money, art and neurosis, and relationship of ideas 
to literature. 
i Wheelwright, J, H. Kentucky stand, 19r 1951 APH Read by George Barnes 
A novel for teen aged boys and girls. It is a story of Jim Cheston, 
nineteen, who in 1777 set out for Kentucky to find some land his father 
had purchased. 

Wilson, Charles M. The tropics, l8r 1951 APH Read by Burt Blackwell 
Also available in Braille. 

The world importance of the tropics in sun power and manpower is clear- 
ly demonstrated in this informative account of some of the most habitable 
remaining frontiers. 

Wodehouse, P, G. The old reliable, llr 1951 AFB Read by Maury Tuckerman 
A lighthearted and also lightheaded novel about Hollywood, in wihich an 
antique movie star, a dubious butler, a genial alcoholic and some old 
and young writers vie with each other for possession of a diary that may 
or may not contain scandalous information. 

Yates, Marie Z, Medical shorthand dictionary. 2v 1951 APH 

Published for the Federal Security Agency, Office of Vocational Rehabili- 
tation, Washington, D, C. 

Zara, Louis, Rebel run, l5r 1951 APH Read by George Barnes 

An historical novel based on true events. In 1862 a band of Federal sol- 
diers led by Captain James Andrews, attempted to cut communications be- 
tween Atlanta and Chattanooga by seizing a locomotive and three box 
cars and making a dash northward. They were pursued, most of them 
captured and some were executed. 



BIBLE READINGS IN BRAILLE 



The Bible Reading Fellowship has available in braille, Bible Readings 
with commentary, which are published quarterly. The annual subscription 
is 8 shillings per year (this is approximately $l a 12), postage free. Send 
all subscriptions and requests for information directly to: Miss G» E, 
Mundey, U6 Uphill Road, Mill Hill, London, N, W, 7, England. 



WALT WHITMAN— May 31* l8lp - March 26, 18?2 
From "American Authors, 1600~1°00" 



Walt Whitman, poet, was born in Huntington, Long Island, N. Y., the 
second of the nine children of Walter Whitman and Louisa Whitman. Neither 
parent had any intellectual interests, and the oldest and youngest of 
their children were imbeciles. Like their second child, the Whitmans were 
large, slow, and placid* Yet in their stolidity there was a pronounced 
streak of hyper-sensitivity which in Walt (he called himself so from 1855 
to distinguish himself from his father) amounted to genuine neuroticism. 

Whitman had very little schooling, and that little in the public schools 
of Brooklyn, where the family moved in 1823. There he was remembered chief- 
ly for his amiability, clumsiness, and slovenliness. His summers he spent 
on Long Island, then rural instead of suburban. It was a good preparation 
for a poet who was to be acutely aware of terrestrial and marine nature, 
and yet also to be essentially urban. It came to a close too soon, when 
at eleven the child became an office boy. The next year he was a printer ! s 
devil on the Long Island Patriot , and next on the Long Island Star . From 
1833 to l8!il he alternated bewteen printing and country school teaching, 
moving frequently but not far; in I838 and 1839 he edited the Long Islander , 
in his native town. Very conventional verses began to appear in this and 
other newspapers. Now for the first time be began to read seriously in the 
classics of literature and philosophy. Now also he became interested in 
politics, and gained some local reputation as a stump speaker for the 
Democratic Party — and Tammany I 

The years 18I& and 18U8 were Whitman's period of inner growth. Out- 
wardly he was both conformist and reformer. He turned up for brief periods 
on the staffs of at least ten New York papers and magazines, usually being 
discharged for inattention to his duties or else resigning in a huff. The 
most important of these jobs were with the Democratic Review and the Brooklyn 
Eagle . For the latter he wrote, not verse, but editorials and stories, in- 
cluding the "temperance novel," Franklin Evans , which reads like a burlesque 
of itself. Aside from reforms of all nature, his chief journalistic inter- 
est was in the theatre, of which he was a passionate addict. 

In 181*8 came that curious journey to New Orleans, exaggerated in his 
later memories as having had great duration, though actually it lasted just 
three months. This is the "mystery" which is supposed to .lurk in Walt Whit- 
man's life; it is supposed to involve some hidden romance, and he himself 
embroidered it in later years until he confided that here lived the anony- 
mous mother of his six apocryphal children! As a matter of cold fact, he 
heard in the lobby of a New York theatre of an opening on the New Orleans 
Crescent , applied for and obtained a job, went with his brother Jeff to 
New Orleans, worked a month, quarreled with the editor, and, still with his 
brother, came home. 

He came back to New York and to his period of dandyism, when he sported 
a cane, iras fussy about the cut of his clothes, and haunted the theatres. 
This too was his Bohemian era, when he was one of the habitues of Pfaff 's 
beer cellar. Early in the 'fifties he may have been influenced by the 
epilogue to George Sand's novel, The Countess of Rudolstadt , in which the 
figure of a great humanitarian poet of the common people is delineated. He 
worked on more papers, editing the Brooklyn Times from 1856 or 1857 to 1859; 



8 

he may, before this, have run a book store and a printing establishment, 
and he certainly helped his father (who was now partially paralyzed) from 
1851 to 185U, when the elder Whitman was putting up rows of cheap wooden 
dwellings. He had his mine! set on becoming an or at or 5 he practiced de- 
clamation and prepared lectures, few of which were ever delivered. He be- 
came a convert to phrenology, then fashionable and accredited, and be- 
lieved devoutly its findings in his own case. 

In the midst of this period, his most significant until the Civil War, 
came the central date of Walt Whitman 1 s life, 1855. It was signalized by 
the appearance of the first slim edition, printed at his own expense, of 
Leaves of Grass — not as we know it now, however, for the next edition, in 
1856, contained many more poems. Eleven editions appeared during his life- 
time, each longer than the last,, Here for t he first time Whitman as we 
know him appears— the long, rolling, irregularly accented line, the per- 
sonal refrains, the preoccupation with love and death, the celebration of 
self, the poet as prophet • Whitman had expected condemnation, and was 
prepared to defend his "naked subject-matter," but what he received in 1855 
was silence. Never in all his career was he widely known to or popular with 
the "plain man," the democrat, the "Americano," whose voice he announced 
himself to be; it was always the leaders of thought and culture who hailed 
Whitman. Emerson was the first of these, much to his discomfiture; for 
his words in a private letter, "I greet you at the beginning of a great 
career," were quoted on the cover of the second edition, which contained 
poems that caused the ascetic Emerson to shrivel with dismay. This second 
edition loosed the whirlwind, and Whitman was viciously attacked forj&any 
years by the prurient-minded and the bigots. He had indeed given mid- 
nineteenth-century America a terrific dose to swallow, and that he felt 
this instinctively is evidenced by the gradual mellowing and "spiritualiz- 
ing" of his later works, their increasing concern with a mystical democracy 
and a lofty religious philosophy. 

The Civil War marked the next break in Whitman's life, which more than 
that of most men is divisible into distinct periods. He had been fired 
from the Brooklyn Eagle , back in l81j.8, because of an anti-slavery editorial; 
but after his New Orleans trip he was notably milder on the subject. Never- 
theless, the Union had to him an almost mystic significance, an out growth 
of his feeling for America as the chosen land of the future; and he was 
one of Lincoln 1 s earliest admirers, though there is no proof that the two 
men ever met. In 1862 Whitman's brother George, a Union soldier, was 
wounded, and Walt went to Virginia to care for him» During the war he was 
an indefatigable visitor at the hospitals for wounded soldiers, both Northern 
and Southern; he read to them, helped to nurse them, raised funds to buy 
them comforts— all this purely on his own, with no official backing. His 
own way he earned by copying documents for the Department of the Interior. 
In 1865 his superior in office suddenly realized that this clerk was the 
author of the notorious Leaves of Grass and discharged him. He soon secured 
another clerkship in the Attorney General's office, but he was a good enough 
publicity man to r ealize the value of this very real persecution, and he 
made the most of it. His young disciple, John Burroughs, brought out his 
Notes on Walt Mhitman , a hot defense of the "poet and person"; it was not 
until Burroughs 1 death that it was learned that Whitman himself wrote most 
of the book! 



In 1873 Whitman suffered a light stroke of paralysis. It was a 
warning of inherited disease. He was obliged to leave Washington, and he 
came to Camden, N, J«, to live with the same brother to whom he had gone 
in Virginia. Soon after his arrival his beloved mother died. The shock 
in his previously enfeebled condition combined to make him a permanent in- 
valid. Nevertheless, until 1886 he was not confined to his room, as he 
was later; he traveled to Colorado, to Boston, and to Canada. He took to 

dressing in workmen's garb— half a pose, half a genuine instinct. In 
1881; he was able to buy the little house at 328 Mickle Street, Camden, in 
which he died and which is preserved as a Whitman museum. Here there eame 
to him visitors from all over America, from England, and the Continent, 
whose names read like a roster of the most distinguished writers of the 
time. He had bitter enemies, but they were overwhelmed by his adoring 
friends. He was now truly "the good gray poet," paralyzed but perhaps 
happier than at any other time of his life. Even his egocentricity had 
become lovable, and he had long outgrown the image of himself as "lusty, 
brawling, hirsute": now he was a reverend old man with a long white 
beard who purred at the idolatry of his disciples. 

And yet did Whitman ever attain his own ambition? He wanted to be known, 
to have influence, as a seer, as a prophet of democracy. Instead he was re- 
jected by the common peoplej it was the variants— the revolutionaries and 
the poets— who made him their standard-bearer. He was the father of free 
verse, with his rhythmic chants which at their best have the magnificent 
beat of the ocean, and at their worst read like a mail-order house catologue 
interspersed with misused foreign phrases „ He called himself "a child, very 
old," and that is what he was, with all the child's lack of taste and senti- 
mental egotism— but a child of genius. "The most original and passionate 
American poet," Mark Van Doren has called him. Deep under all the "cosmic" 
shouts is the voice of a lonely man who felt his lack of kinship with human- 
ity, and so all the more strenuously proclaimed his identity of feeling with 
it. It may be that this strain of neuroticism is the saving leaven which 
(more than any spurious "mysteries," more than any accidental reading or 
chance encounters) made of the dull, orthodox editorial writer the great 
poet that Walt Whitman finally became. 

Editor's note: Among the author's works the follotiiing are in braille 
or Talking Book form: 

Democratic vistas from the complete prose works of Walt Whitman. 6r AFB 

Leaves of Grass, kr APH 

Leaves of Grass. 9r AFB 

Selections from American and British Poets, liir AFB 

Two complete records are devoted to the selected poems of Walt Whitman. 

About Walt Whitman: 

Brooks, Van Wyck, Times of Melville and Whitman. 6v APH 

Canby, Henry Seidel, Classic Americans, l^v APH 

Winwar, Frances. American giant: Walt Whitman and his times. Uv BIA 



HAND-COPIED BOOKS 
This is a list of hand-crpied books recently reported by the libraries. 



r 



10 



Unless otherwise indicated, these books are in Grade 2. 

How to locate hand-copied books in libraries: Following each title in 
this list you will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. 
These are the abbreviations for the names of the libraries for the blind 
and indicate the libraries in which you will find the books. A key to these 
abbreviations, giving the names and addresses of each library is included 
in every January and June issue. 



Mystery story. 
1950 LC 

Philadelphia 



Bentley, Nicolas. The tongue-tied canary, hv 19h9 NYPL 
^Blakeslee, Alton L. Arthritis, and the miracle drugs, lv 
Public affairs pamphlet Number 166. 
Bond, Nelson. The world of William Gresham. lv Grade lj 
A story taken from "Bluebook Magazine," november, 1951. 
/Browning, Robert. Favorite hymns for children, lv Grade 1§ Philadelphia 
Browning, Robert, Selected poems, lv Grade if- Philadelphia 
/Bruckberger, Raymond L, The seven miracles of Gubbio and the eighth, a par- 
able. Translated from the French by Gerold Lauck. lv 19li8 Xavier, 
recently added to Philadelphia. 
v Christie, Agatha. And then there were none. Uv Grade lj Denver 
Mystery story. 
Clark, Walter Van Tilburg. The track of the cat. llv 19^9 LC Also avail- 
able in Talking Book 

A novel in which all of the action takes place in three days on a remote 
Nevada ranch. The first snowfall of the year brings the knowledge that 
a panther is prowling the valley. The story revolves about the members 
of the family living on the ranch: the men who each in his own way must 
track down the cat in the environs of the ranch house* This tale is told 
on two levels, the one an exciting realistic action story, the other a 
symbolic representation of the conflict between good and evil. Rave reviews. 
, Clewes, Winston D» A* Journey into spring, by 19h9 LC 

Light novel set in modern rural England, about a returning war veteran 
with an anti-social attitude, who learns to accept civic and personal 
re sp onsibility . 
Connolly, William L, Federal labor laws and agencies. 2v 191+8 LC 
U, S, Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin Number 100. 
/Davis, Norman, Pick en ? s great adventure, lv 19p0 NYPL 

Juvenile fiction which recounts the story of a little African boy's canoe- 
/ ing holiday, 
Derleth, August W. Shadow of night, 6v 19U3 LC 

A psychological novel about a German from Tyrol who followed a man half 
way around the world with murder in his heart. The time is 18U0. 
Dunner, Joseph, The Republic of Israel, its history and its promise, 8v 1950 
LC 

A detailed history of the movements and events leading up to the found- 
ing of the Republic of Israel, written from a moderate Zionist point of 
view. 

Estes, Eleanor. The Middle Moffat. 3v 19U2 Chicago, recently added NYPL 
Juvenile fiction about a pleasant family with three very active children. 
First half-hour instruction on the Hammond chord organ, lv NYPL 
Flanagan, Edward J,, Reverend, as told to Ford McCoy, Understanding your boy. 
2v 1950 NY Guild 

Father Flanagan, who is known for his "Boys Town," discusses his philosophy 
of boy training. 
Foster, Genevieve. Abraham Lincoln's world, lv 1950 Chicago, recently added 



/ 



'to NYPL 



Juvenile biography. 



11. 



<£fa" 



3v 19U6 NYPL 
2 "0 bere o 



Fowler, Gene. Timber line. 9v Denver 

Gardner, a>. S. Case of the drowning duck. Uv Denver Mystery story 
Gardner, E. S. Ihe case of the musical cow. Uv 1950 LC Mystery story 
General Accident, Fire and Life Assurance Corporation, Ltd., Perth, Scotland 

and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. General disability policy, Iv Philadelphia 
German language: Kastner, Erich. Drei Manner im Schnee. 7v Philadelphia 
Graham, Winston. Night without stars. 5v 1950 NY Guild 

Mystery story. The sleuth is a blind man who regains partial sight. 
Italian text: Arbib-Costa, Alfonso. Italian lessons. Uv 1909 NYPL 
Italian language: Goggio, Emilio, editor. Due comedie moderne. 

Contents: Vol* 1 "Lumie di Sicilia" by Luigi Pirandello j Vol, 

affogare" by Leo di Castelnovo; Vol. 3 Vocabulary, 
Hammond-Innes, Ralph. Calling the Southern Cross. Uv Grade 1^ Denver 
Haywood, Carolyn. "B" is for Betsy. 2v Grade lj 1939 Philadelphia 

Juvenile fiction 
Huggins, Roy. Lovely lady, pity me I 3v 19U9 NYPL Mystery story 
Incorporation of Insurance Companies. Article II lv Grade l| Philadelphia 
Kane, Henry. Laughter came screaming, lv 1951 Philadelphia 

From "Cosmopolitan Magazine." 
Kipling, Rudyard. The elephant's child, lv 1902 NYPL 
Landry, Robert John. This fascinating radio business, 6v 19U6 LC 

A history of CDmmercial radio broadcasting with special reference to the 

mechanics of present day broadcasting. 
Latin text: Basore, John W., and Weber, S. H. Latin poetryj selections from Naevius 

to the hymn-writers. Uv 1925 Student Library, NYPL 
Latin text: Scott, Harry F. , and others. Using Latin. 8v 19U8 Student Library 

NYPL 
MacPherson, John. The mystery chef's never fail cookbook. Uv 19U9 NYPL 
Manners, William. Father and the angels. Uv 19U7 LC 

Father in this particular case was the rabbi of the Jewish community in Zanes- 

ville, Ohio. This wise yet unworldly man is pictured lovingly by his son. 
Ocean Accident and Guarantee Corporation, Ltd. Boiler and machinery policy, lv 

Philadelphia 
0' Meara, Walter. Brink of madness and the first Negro governor, lv Philadelphia 
Orga, Orfan. The portrait of a Turkish family. 5v 1950 NYPL 

The author was born in Istanbul, the elder son of a wealthy family of old 

Turkey. World War I shattered many of the old customs and the author seeks to 

recapture them in this autobiography. 
Oursler, Fulton. Why I know there is a God. 3v 1950 LC 



I 



v 







BRAJU.E BOOK REVIEBF 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 



Volume 21 



June 1952 



No. 6. 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the U« S # Government 

Through the Library of Congress 

and 

Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 

1839 Frankfort Avenue 

Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the Editor, Diva Agostinelli 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



CONTENTS 
June, 1952 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 
TALKING BOOKS 
DISTRIBUTING LIBRARIES FOR GOVERNMENT-OWNED BOOKS 
LIBRARIES GIVING NATION-WIDE SERVICE 
BRAILLE CATALOG OF THE NEW YORK GUILD 
BOOKS FOR PRACTICE READING 
WHAT EVERY BLIND PERSON SHOULD KNOW 
HELEN KELLER'S BIRTHDAY 
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS MAGAZINE 
HAND-COPIED BOOKS 



I 



2 
BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, June 1952 

PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

All press-made or Talking Books here listed are provided by the Federal Govern- 
ment unless otherwise noted. The letters NUSGP stand for the phrase "not a publi- 
cs a tion of the United States Government." Copies of these Government-supplied 
books are placed in the twenty-eight regional libraries which serve the blind. Read- 
ers are required to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of Con- 
gress to serve their respective territories, A list of these libraries and their 
territories appears regularly in the January and June numbers of the magazine. 

In the list which follows, the book notations are based on information appear- 
ing in the "Book Review Digest" and other standard reference works, 

Asch, Sholem, Moses. 6v 1951 APH 

A panoramic novel of the Exodus, with Moses the epic hero. Reviews generally 
favorable. 

Berrill, N # The living tide. 3v 195l APH 

A study of the life in the tidal waters of the Atlantic ooast, mainly from dry 
Tortugas to Maine. He indicates how his observations fit into the broad pic- 
ture of modern biology, perhaps the most rapidly advancing of all the sciences. 
The author has a knack for story telling and is always entertaining whether he 
writes about rock pools, anemones, sea urchins or Oliver, the neurotic octopus. 

Br own, Lilian. Cleopatra slept here. 3v 195l APH 

The author of "I married a dinosaur" describes another expedition in this volume. 
This time, her paleontologist husband was looking for the bones of an extinct 
antelcpe-like creature called a samotherium on the island of Samos in the Aege- n. 

Bush, Maybell G. Enjoying our land. 3v Grade l| 19li0 APH 

Corbett, Elizabeth. Portrait of Isabelle. 3v 1951 APH 

The author has called this novel the story of a "happy woman." The book details 
the day-by-day living of a f amily from the last years of the nineteenth century 
to the present. The setting is Illinois, Milwaukee and N. X© Revie*js mixed, 

Deljnar, Vina. The Marcaboth women. 3v 1951 APH 

Old Mrs* Marcaboth and her sons became fabulously wealthy as merchants. All the 
Marcaboth wives looked up to their mother-in-law and obeyed their husbands. There 
came a day when the oldest son married a cheap gold digger, and her defiance of 
the family rule, gave courage to the other younger women. The brief conflict 
lasts one day, but the fear of years was gone, 

Grey,Zane, The dude ranger, 3v 1930 BIA A Western story. 

Irwin, Laetitia. The golden hammock. kv 1951 APH 

Family chronicle of a Southern clan, opening in 1899 and ending with World War I. 
The central character is Nisba, slightly handicapped by a beautiful mother, 

Lincoln, Victoria E, Out from Eden, ijY 1951 APH 

The unorthodox doings of a lovable, unconventional family, in which the father 
is an artist ; the mother a gentle matriarch, and her husband *s favorite model; 
• the daughter a beautiful hedonist; and the son a near-genius at mathematics. 

Magary, Alvin E, Saints without halos. 2v 1951 HP 

The author is pastor of a Brooklyn Presbyterian church, and he writes of famil- 
iar personalities from "new angles." The personalities are the people of the 
early Christian church described in modern terms. 

Marsh, Wgaio. Night at the Vulcan. 3v 1951 APH A detective story. 

O'Brien, John S # Valiant; dog of the timberline. 2v 1937 APH 

Story of a German shepherd dog, trained to herd sheep on a Western ranch, and 
the important part he played in the battle between his master, a sheep herder, 
and neighboring cattlemen. 



0»Flaherty, Liam, Insurrection. Uv 1950 N3B Panda ftlkh* Price 3s per 
volume, NUSGP 

The theme is the Easter: Rising in Ireland, in 1916, and is notable for its 
speed and tension. The passion of pity that enforms it, the poetry that softens 
the horror and illuminates it. 

0*Meara, Walter. Tales of the two borders, Iv 1952 CPH 

Short stories with their settings on the northern and southern borders of the 
United States, The author now lives in southern Arizona, but was reared on the 
Minnesota-Ontario borderj the seven stories reflect his knowledge of the two 
' areas . 

Orr, Myron, The citadel of the lakes, hv 1952 CPH 

A novel based on Mr c Orr's study of the records and legends of his native Michi- 
gan, The setting is Mackinac Island in the straits that form a hinge between 
the states upper and lower peninsulas. The time is the War of 1812, and the 
villain is John Jacob Aster's American Fur Company. 

Osborn, Alexander F<> Wake up your mindj 101 ways to develop creativeness.. . 3v 
1952 CPH 

The author a successful advertising man attempts to set down his suggestions for 
using the mind creatively. There is a tendency to coerce people into creative 
activity rather than to free them for it. 

Palmer, Stuart. Nipped in the bud, 3v 1951 APH A Miss Withers mystery. 

Payne, Pierre, S e R„ Red Lion Inn, hv 1951 APH 

To two daughters and a son - of a blustering self«opinionated owner of a Thames- 
side inn, in Boer War days, marriage was discouraged. But one daughter loved 
an aristocratic Fabian, the other a gifted artist. The son fighting Boxers in 
China found his Chinese mate, 

Queen, Ellery. The origin of evil. 2v 1951 HP A detective story. 

Richards, H, M. S. In the Holy Land, lv Grade ij 1950 APH 

Available' through Christian Record Benevolent Association, Sic,, 3705 S. 1$ St,, 
Lincoln- 6, Nebraska, NUSGP 

Scharfstein, Zevi, and Scharstein, Ben*am& Hebrew self»taught. 2v 19h7 APH 
Reprinted under the auspices of the Jewish Braille Institute of America, 18U6 
Harrison Avenue, New York 53, N. Y. NUSGP 

Shaw, Shirley, The turquoise trail. liv 1950 HP 

A novel based on the diary of Susan Shelby Magoffin who made the overland 
journey from Missouri to Mexico at the time of the Mexico War. 

Shaw, Irwin, The troubled air, 5v 1951 APH 

Clement Archer, director of a popular radio program,wa& ordered ito •£ fr&'f ive actors 
only suspected of communism c He asked for two weeks in which to help them clear 
their names. During that time the appalling realism of American fascism muti- 
lated Archer's attempts, causing suicide, destruction and evil, triumphant with- 
in a whited sepulchre democracy. 

Simpson, Evan, J, (Evan John, pseudonym) Ride home tomorrow; the chronicle of a 
crusader, 5v 1950 APH 

A novel about the last years of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, the prelude to the 
third crusade. 

Ward, Barbara, Policy for the West, 3v 1951 HP 

Miss Ward is an economist of established reputation. In this book she explores 
the scale of the challenge the West is facing, and the costs of the policy of 
containment. 



( 



TALKING BOOKS 



Andross, Matilda Erickson, Alone with God. 6r 1917 APH Read by Elmer R, 
Walde. Recorded for Christian Record Benevolent Association, 3705 S, U8tb St., 
Lincoln 6, Nebraska. NUSGP 



Armstrong, Hamilton Fish. Tito and Goliath. 22r 1951 APH Read by William 
Gladden 

This book seeks to go outside the frontiers of Yugoslavia and analyzes the im- 
pact of Tito s s heresy on other "iron curtain" countries and the general methods- 
of Soviet control. 

Burgess. Perry. Born of those years. 23r 195l AFB Read by Eermit Murdook 
The autobiography of a man who for many years has fought in the battle against 
leprosy. 

Burr 5 Pamela a My Turkish adventure, 12r 195l APH Read by Terry Hayes Sales 
The author went to Istanbul in 19l*5 to teach English in the American Girls 1 
College.' The book describes her experiences during her year's stay. 

Chippendale, Captain H e A, Sails and whales. 12r 1951 AFB Read by William 
L&zar. 

A retired captain's reminiscences of his boyhood in St Helena in the i860— '90 *s, 
a rendezvous of the old sailing whalers— mostly of his experiences as a deck 
hand on whaling vessels, and of Bedford, their home port, with a note on the de- 
cline of the industry, and finally of his experiences on war-time convoys, 

DeWohl, Louis. The restless flame. l3r 1951 APH Read by Kenneth Meeker 
Fictional biography of St fl Augustine which begins with his sixteenth year. It 
covers the years of his youth and young manhood, then skips to the time when 
Augustine was bishop of Hippo. The final chapter deals with the last two years 
of Augustine *s life. 

Douglas, William 0. Strange lands and friendly people. 22r 1951 APH Read 
by Paul Clark 

Reports by Justice Douglas on his trips in 19^9* 1950 and 1951 through Persia, 
Greece, Israel, India and the Arab and Moslem states. 

Fisher, Vardis. Valley of vision. 25r 1951 APH Read by Burt Blackwell 
A novel based on the life of King Solomon. 

Freeman, Douglas S« George Washington: Vol. Ill— Planter and patriot. l;8r 1951 
APH Read by Walter Gerard 

The third volume in Dr„ Freeman *s monumental biography of Washington begins with 
his marriage to Martha Custis, and ends in the spring of 1778. 

Gumpert, Martin, M.D, The anatomy of happiness. 21r 1951 AFB Read by 
Sydney Smith 

An intelligent, garrulous, digressive, and at some points debatable book that 
leaves no stone of daily life unturned, from housing to gout, from snobbishness 
to insomnia, from love to allergies. How much is good sense and how much non- 
sense, the reader will have to weed out for himself, 

Haycox, Ernest. The earthbreakers. 33r 1952 APH Read by Livingston Gilbert 
A panoramic novel about the hardships, joys, sorrows^ personality conflicts and 
achievements of a group of settlers on the trek to the Pacifio coast in the I81t0 ! s. 

Hitchens, Dolores B. (D B, Olsen, pseudonym) The cat and Capricorn. 12r 1951 
APH Read by George Patterson Detective story, 

Keith, Agnes Newton, White man returns. 20r 1951 AFB Read by Helen Harrel- 
son 

Personal reminiscences by the author of "Land Below the Wind" and "Three Came 
Back." In 19h& the Keith family returned to Borneo and the book chronicles the 
reconstruction of that country, 

Kelly, Fred C, editor, Miracle at Kitty Hawkj the letters of Wilbur and Orville 
Wright. 20r 195l APH Read by Kenneth Meeker 

An interesting and illuminating collection of letters written by the brothers who 
were the first men to fly an aircraft. 

Overstreet, Bonaro, W. Understanding fear in ourselves and others. 17r 1951 
AFB Read by Alexander Scourby 

We know, . intellectually, what we should do to bring peace to ourselves and to the 
world. What blocks us from achieving it? In this thoughtful and readable book 
Bonaro Overstreet fully describes the villain that assaults peace-fear. 



The health of the mind. llr 1951 APH Read by George 



Read by Ethel Everett 



ReeSj John Bawling, 
Patterson 
An introduction to the subject of mental health. 

Ross, Ishbel. Journey into light, 33r 1951 AFB 
Also available in braille, 
A history of work for the blind frcm the earliest times to the present. Besides 
the description of broad trends in this field, there are dozens of sketches of 
individuals who have made important contributions. 

Roy, Gabrielle. Where nests the water henj translated from the French by Harry 
L* Mines e. 13r 19& AFB Read by Helen Shields. 
Two stories about simple people living far from civilization in Manitoba, Canada, 

Stokes, Thomas , I e The Savannah. 22r 1951 APH Read by Paul Clark 

History, politics, legend and social conditions are interwoven in this story of 
the Savannah, boundary river between Georgia and South Carolina, from the days of 
theSpanish explorers to the present. 

Thomas, Charles W. Ice is where you find it, 23r l?5l APH Read by Milton 
Metz. 

The story of the Greenland Patrol in World War II, by the one-t jme captain of 
the' Northland,, who later became commander of the whole unit. 

Thomas, Lowell J, Back to Mandalay, liir 195l APH Read by Milton Metz 
An account of guerilla operations in Burma during World War II. 

Van Daren, Carl, Jane Mecombj the favorite sister of Benjamin Franklinj her life 
here first fully narrated from their entire surviving correspondence. lljr 
1950 APH Read by George Patterson. 

Jane Franklin Mecomb was the youngest sister of Benjamin Franklin and always 
his favorite. Although they seldom saw each other, theirs was a rare relation- 
ship, and from their earliest years were so congenial that they wrote unfailing- 
ly to the end of their long lives. The letters give* us a richly human picture 
of both Jane Meccmb and Benjamin Franklin, and a portrait of colonial life. 

Wentworth, Patricia, "Anna, where are you?" l6r 1951 AFB Read by Kay 
Parker A Miss Silver mystery. 



" 



Residents of- 
Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 
(northern) 

California 
(southern) 

Colorado 
Connecticut 



DISTRIBUTING LIBRARIES FOR GOVHINMENT-OWNED BOOKS 

Borrow books from— 

Kriegshaber Library for the Blind, 679 Piedmont Avenue, N.E,, 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Library for the Blind, Seattle Public Library, 731 North 35th 
Street, Seattle, Washington 

Braille Institute of America Library, lUl North Vermont 
Avenue, Los Angeles, California 

Oklahoma Library Commission, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

California State Library, Sacramento, California 

Braille Institute of America Library, 7ill North Vermont 
Avenue, Los Angeles, California 

Books for the Blind, Denver Public Library, 37th and York 
Streets, Denver, Colorado 

Library for t he Blind; New York Public Library, 137 West 
25th Street, New York, New York 



■ 



6 



Delaware 



Free Library of Philadelphia, Logan Square, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania 



District of Columbia Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C e 



Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 
Idaho 



Florida Library for the Blind, Welch Convalescent Center, 
Florida Council for the Blind, No, 12, Daytona Beach, Florida 

Kriegshaber Library for the Blind, 679 Piedmont Avenue, N E a , 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Library of Hawaii, Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii 

Library Association of Portland, 801 S e W<> Tenth Avenue, 
Portland, Oregon 



Illinois 

(north of Springfield) Department of Books for the Blind, Chicago Public Library, 

Chicago, Illinois 



Illinois 

(south, including 

Springfield) 

Indiana 

Iowa 
Kansas 

Kentucky 
Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

(outside of Wayne 
County) 

Michigan 
(Wayne County) 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 



Illinois School for the Blind Library, Jacksonville, Illinois 

Service for the Blind, Indiana State Library, Indianapolis-) I^d, 

Illinois School for the Blind Library, Jacksonville, Illinois 

Wolfner Memorial Library for the Blind, 38I& Olive Street, 
St« Louis, Missouri 

Cincinnati Public Library, 629 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Library for the Blind, Public Library of New Orleans, New 
Orleans, Louisiana 

Perkins Institution I Ibrary, Fatertown, Massachusetts 

Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D, C. 

Perkins Institution Library, Water town, Massachusetts 

State Library for the Blind, Saginaw, Michigan 



Department for the B lind, Wayne County Library, 3661 Trum- 
bull Avenue, Detroit, Michigan 

Minnesota vBraille and Sight-Saving School Library, Faribault, 
Minnesota 

Library for the Blind, Public Library of New Orleans, New 
Orleans, Louisiana 

Wolfner Memorial Library for the Blind, 38hk Olive Street, 
St # Louis, Missouri 



Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 



New York 

(other than Greater 
New York City and 
Long Island) 

New York 

(Greater New York 
City and Long Island) 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 



Ohio 

(.south of Columbus) 

Ohio 

(north, including 
Columbus) 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 



Pennsylvania 

(east of Harrisburg) 

Pennsylvania 
(west, including 
Harrisburg) 

Puerto Rico 



Rhode Island 
South Carolina 
South Dakota 



Library for the Blind, Seattle Public Library, 731 North 
35th Street, Seattle, Washington 

Nebraska Public Library Commission, State Capitol, Lincoln 9, 
Nebraska 

California State Library, Sacra^entcj California 

Perkins Institution Library, Water town, Massachusetts 

Free Library of Philadelphia, Logan Square, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania 

Eooks for the Blind, Denver Public Library, 37th and York 
Streets, Denver, Colorado 

Library for the Blind, New York State Library, Albany, 
New York 



Library for the Blind, New York Public Library, 137 West 2£tli 
Street, New York, New York 

Division for the Blind, Library of Congress^ Washington, DoC , 

Minnesota Braille and Sight-Saving School Library, Faribault, 
Minnesota 

Cincinnati Public Library, 629 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Library for the Blind, Cleveland Public Library, Cleveland, 
Ohio 

Oklahoma Library Commission, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

Library Association of Portland, 801 S„ ¥ e Tenth Avenue, 
Portland, Oregon 

Free Library of Philadelphia, Logan Square, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania 

Division for the Blind, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Library for the Blind, New York Public Library, 137 West 2£th 
Street, New York, New York 

Perkins Institution Library, Watertown, Massachusetts 

Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C, 

Minnesota Braille and Sight-Saving School Library, Faribai 
Minnesota 



8 



Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Virginia Islands 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Cincinnati Public Library, 629 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Texas State Library, Austin, Texas 

Books for the Blind, Free Public Library, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Library for the Blind, New York State Library, Albany, New York 

Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D„ C a 

Library for the Blind, New York Public Library* 137 West 25th 
Street, New York, New York 

Library for the Blind, Seattle Public Library, 731 North 35th 
Street, Seattle, Washington 

Division for the Blind, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Department of Books for the Blind, Chicago Public Library, 
Chicago, Illinois 

Books for the Blind, Free Public Library, Salt Lake City, Utah 



LIBRARIES GIVING NATION-WIDE SERVICE 

Braille Circulating Library, 70l* West Grace Street, Richmond. Virginia 
Circulates religious books only. 

Jewish Braille Library, 18U6 Harrison Avenue, New York 53, New York 

Library for the Blind of the Lutheran-Missouri Synod, 210 North Braodway, St, Louis, 
Missouri 

New York Guild for the Jewish Blind, 1880 Broadway, New York 23, New York 

Theosophical Book Association for the Blind, Krotona, Ojai, California 
Circulates only theoscphioal books. 

Xavier Society for the Blind Library, l$k East 23rd Street, New York 10, New York 



BRAILLE CATALOG OF THE NEW YORK GUILD 

The Braille Library, of the New York Guild for the Jewish Blind, (a non-sec- 
tarian organization) 1880 Broadway^ New York 23* N« Y„, has just issued its new 
1952 Braille Catalog^ which will be sent free, upon request to readers throughout 
the United States. This Library contains a fine collection of fiction and text- 
books which are not available at o^her braille libraries. Readers of braille are 
invited to take advantage of this free, natioiwurAde library service* 



BOOKS FOR PRACTICE READING 

Three small but interesting books have been issued in grade 1 braille, suitable 
for practice reading » The books are available through your regional braille li- 
brary. Please send requests directly to the library serving your state, 

Eney, John K. ..•For thou art with me. Reprinted from "Redbook Magazine," 

May, 1951 lv APH 
Henderson, Louis T« Lcokl I can see the wind. Reprinted from "Redbook 

Magazine," May, 1951 lv APH 

An article written by the mother of a blind boy, who will never forget 

the day her child said, "Mummy, look J I can see the wind." 
Sictkt Rex. The cop killer. lv 1951 APH A Nero Wolfe mystery story. 

WHAT EVER¥ BLIND PERSON SHOULD KNOW 

The third pamphlet in this series of pamphlets issued by the American Founda- 
tion for the Blind has recently been published. This is the pamphlet called 
"Library Service for the Blind" available in inkprint only. The price is 10 cents. 

Either coins or stamps may accompany orders which should be addressed to the 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc., 15 West 16th Street, New York 11, New York. 

HELEN KELLER'S BIRTHDAY. 

On June 27, Helen Keller will celebrate her 72nd birthday. The date will 
also mark the formal opening of the Helen Keller museum in Tuscumbia, Alabama, 
Helen Keller's birthplace. The project is sponsored by the Friends of Helen 
Keller in recognition of her extraordinary achievements. 

At present, Helen Keller is over seas on another of her notable missions 
to help her fellow human beings who might be, as she terms it, "less fortunate than 
myself." The Braille Book Review takes this occasion to send its warmest birthday 
greetings to Helen Keller. 



LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS MAGAZINE 

ABS American Bible Society, ij.50 Park Avenue, New York 22, New York 

AFE American Foundation for the Blind, 15 West l6th Street, New York 11, 
New York 

APH American Printing House for the Blind, 1839 Frankfort Avenue, Louisville 
6, Kentucky 

ARC American Red Cross, 6l6 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 

BIA. Braille Institute of America, 7ljl North Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles 27 9 
California 

CPH Clovernook Printing House for the Blind, 6990 Hamilton Avenue, Cincinnati, 
Ohio 

HP The Howe Press, Perkins Institution, Watertown, Massachusetts 

JBI Jewish Braille Institute of America, 182*6 Harrison Avenue, New York 53,N.Y, 



10 



LC 

N3B 



Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 



National Institute for the Blind, 221* Great Portland Street, London W 1, 
England 



NIBGP Stands for the phrase "Wot a publication of the United States Government" 

NY Guild New York Guild for the Jexri.sh Blind, 1880 Broadway, New York, New York 

N3CPL New York Public Library, Library for the Blind, 137 West 25th Street, 
New York, New York 

TBA Theosophical Book Association for the Blind, Krotona, Ojai, California 

Xavier Xavier Society for the Blind, 15U East 23rd street, New York 10, New York 



HAND-COPIED BOOKS 

This is a list of handr-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Un- 
less otherwise indicated, these books are in Grade 2, 

How to looate hand<»copied books in libraries: Following each title in this 
list you will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are 
the abbreviations for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate, the 
libraries in which you will find the books, A key to these abbreviations, giving 
the names and addresses of each library is included in every January and June issue. 

Pearson, Kesketh. Dickens; his character, comedy and career, 8v Grade 1§ 
19k9 NY Guild Also available as Talking Book 

A life of Charles Dickens which makes no claim to new material, and -which de- 
scribes Dickens as inherently an actor in all his actions. Popular but good, 

Phelps, William Lyon, Essays on modern dramatists, I4.V Grade lj 1921 
Student Library, NYPL ' 

Contents: J. M. Barrie, George Bernard Shaw, John Galsworthy, Clyde Fitch, 
Maurice Maeterlinck, Edmond Rostand, 

Porter, E. H. PoUyanna, kr Grade lj Denver 

Quine^ Willard Van Orman. Methods of logic, 8v 1950 Philadelphia 

Raine, Norman R # Tugboat Annie tries a bluff, lv Grade lj Philadelphia 
From the "Saturday Evening Post," 

Rice, Craig, Innocent bystander, 3v 19^9 LC Mystery story 

Robinson, Mabel L. Runner of the mountain topsj life of Louis Agassiz, 3v 1939 
NYPL • 

Salinger, Jerome D. Catcher in the rye, 3v 1951 NYPL 

Just before Christmas young Holden Caulf ield, knowing he is to be dropped by his 
school, decides to leave early and not report home until he has to, H e spends 
three days and nights in New York City, and this is the story in his own words 
of what he did and saw and suffered, 

Sarton, May, Shadow of a man, 5v 1950 NYPL 

Francis Chabrier, a twenty-six-year-old Bostonian, is upset by the death of his 
mother, divided in heart by the fact of his French-American ancestry, and per- 
turbed by his inability to fall in love* 

Scott,' Sir Walter, David MacBrayne, Ltd. Philadelphia 

Scott > Sir Walter. The lord of the isles. 3v Philadelphia 

Seletz, Jeanette, Hope deferred, lOv Cleveland 

A vivid and detailed novel of a doctor's life from his first day in practice to 



that- day years later when he leaves his practice to become a brain surgeon, 

Slichter, Sumner ♦ The American Economy j its problems and prospects. 3v 19k0 
NYPL 

Smith, H. Allen. We went thataway. $v 19h9 LC 

A humorist's trip West to investigate the '"Western Menace" for the members of 
the Mount Kisco philosophical society. 

Spanish text? Cano, Juan. La vida de un picaro. 2v Student Library, NYPL 

Spanish text: Wilkins, Lawrence A., and luria, M, A. Lecturas f aciles con 
ejercicios. Uv 1933 NYPL 

Spyri, Johanna. Heidi, 6v NYPL Classic children's story. 

Teller, Ludwig. The law of sales. 3v Student Library, NYPL 

Tomlinson, Everett T. Selections from "Stories of the American Revolution." lv 
1897' Philadelphia 

Anderson, Camilla M* Saints, sinners and psychiatry. 3v 195t) LC 

An experienced worker in the fields of psychiatry and mental hygiene describes 
in this book, a theory of the dynamics of human behavior which she has de- 
veloped and applied in her clinical practice. The theory is based on Freud 
and Harry Stack Sullivan, but is written in fairly simple language. 

Beals, Carleton. The long land: Chile » 5v 19h9 LC 

The author a prolific writer on Latin American subjects has here written the 
kind of book that makes travel more interesting and which is helpful in plan- 
ning a trip. 

Bender, James F. How to talk well, £v 19h9 LC 

A book' intended as a text or selfWhelp to better speech. 

BeBSerides, A. J, Thieves market. 3v 19^9 NY Guild 

A novel that portrays the life of the independent trucker: the man who owns his 
own truck, buys a load of the crop he hopes is at a premium on the markets and 
hauls it to Washington Street, near the docks in San Francisco, A rough and 
tough novel. 

Bis sell, Richard. A stretch on the river. 3v 1950 LC Recently added 
NT" Guild 

A well written book about life on a towboat plying plying the upper stretches 
of the Mississippi river. The life it portrays is tough, rough, and bawdy. 

Brinig, Myron. No Marriage in paradise. 6v 19l|8 NY Guild 

A novel about a ruthlessly emotional woman of f orty-»f ive with three grown 
children. When her young daughter kept overlong in the shadow of her mother's 
brilliance, finally rebels, the story reaches its climax. 

Carnahan, Ann. The Vatican; behind the scenes in the Holy City. 2v 19^9 LC 
Informal portrait of the Vatican which includes side lights on such items as 
the Library System, the Swiss Guard and the preservation of art treasures. 

Cary, Joyce. To be a pilgrim, 9v 19U9 NY Guild 

This novel forms part of a first-rate trilogy covering 20th century English 
manners and morals in a half serious, half -picaresque vein. Each book stands 
alone, and this one is told with a retired, senile English lawyer as narrator, 
and the past and present intermingle as the lawyer acts in the present and re- 
members the past. 

Chevalier, Maurice. The man in the straw hat; my story. Translated by Caroline 
Clark. 3v 19U9 LC 

Autobiography of the French music-hall singer and actor from his poverty- strick 
en childhood in Paris in the 1890 »s to the end of World War II. 

Clark, Marguerite. Medicine on the march. 5v 19^9 NY Guild 

A survey of the progress made in the medical sciences during and since World 
War II. 

Clark, Walter Van Tilburg. The track of the cat. 9v 19^9 NY Guild 
Also available as Talking Book. 

Cooper, Duff, Operation heartbreak, 2v 1951 NY Guild 

A plain soldier^ tale which is a delightful tragic comedy of military matters 
with a surprising and poignant climax. 



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BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 



Volume 21 



July 1952 



No. 7. 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the U. S. Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the Editor, Diva Agostinelli 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



CONTENTS 
July 19# 



PEESS-MADE BOOKS 
TALKING BOOKS 

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE 
From "American Authors, 1600-1930" 

HAND-COPIED BOOKS 






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BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, JULY 1952 
PRESS-MADE BOCKS 

All press-made or Talking Books here listed are provided by the Federal Govern- 
ment unless otherwise noted. The letters NUSGP stand for the phrase "not a publica- 
tion of the United States Government." Copies of these Government-supplied books 
are placed in the twenty-eight regional libraries which serve the blind. Readers 
are required to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of Con- 
gress to serve their respective territories. A list of these libraries and their 
territories appears regularly in the January and June numbers of the magazine. 

In the list which follows, the book notations are based on information appear- 
ing in the "Book Review Digest" and other standard reference works. 

Allis, Marguerite. Now we are free. Uv 1952 APH 

At the end of the American Revolution, six young soldiers return to their war- 
pinched homes in Connecticut, and ell but one decide to go Vest and grow up 
with the land. 
Armenian language: Bible. Scripture passages, lv APH 

Published for the American Bible Society, k$0 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. NUSGP 
| ^Ashley-Montague, Montague F. On being intelligent. 2v 1951 APH 
" The book does not aim to startle with hitherto unknown scientific facts. What 
it does, however, is to show that no individual can reasonably claim to be in- 
telligent today until he has grappled with certain facts and implications* 
facts about his own make-up and his place in the human scheme of things. 
Baker, Nina Brown. He wouldn ! t. be king. 2v l°Ul APH NUSGP 
The story of Simon Bolivar for younger readers. 
^Bartlett, Jenniebelle. Cry above the wind. Uv 1951 APH 
Historical novel set in Monterey, California in the 1830' s. 
Beim, Lorraine and Jerrold. Blue jeans. 3v 19U1 APH NUSGP 

A wholesome story abo^t Dale*s transformation from a timid and unpopular boy 
into an independent, strong boy. For readers 9 to 12. 
„jD Berke, Jacqueline and Wilson, Vivian. Watch out for the weather. 2v 1951 HP 

A provocative book concerned with the study of the effects of the weather on 
animal life, especially on man. 
^ ct? Bowman, James C. Pecos Billj the greatest cowboy of all time. 3v 1937 APH NUSGP 
P A story for older beys and girls, but which most adults will enjoy, if they 
like to read the rousing tales of one of America^ great folk heroes. 
^Carhart, Arthur H. Water—or your life. 3v 1951 HP 

A popular summary of the part water plays in our daily life, of how we get 
water, of why there are shortages, and of some of the proposed solutions of 
the problem. 

T Clemens, Samuel L. (Mark Twain, pseudonym) The adventures of Huckleberry Finn, 
tor 19U7 APH NUSGP 
A reprint of the Mark Twain classic. 

rCoatsworth, Elizabeth. Houseboat summer. 2v 191*2 APH NUSGP 
A story for young readers. 

^P Cook, Beatrice. More fish to fry. 3v 1951 APH 

The author ha6 survived fifteen years of marriage to a fishing enthusiast. Her 
husband alternates fishing with his medical practise and the family, which in- 
cludes two sons and many animals, rolls merrily along. 

pr'Coit, Margaret L. John C. Calhoun; American portrait. 8v 1950 HP 

All reviewers agree that this is a skillfully written book. The controversial 
position of the man in American history makes difference of opinion inevitable. 
Miss Co it admires the man but not to point of foolish adoration. 



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Feinberg, Samuel M. Allergy: facts and fancies. 2v 1951 APH 

ield, Eugene, Poems of childhood. 2v 1896 APH NUSGP 
Findlay, Hugh. Gardening for health and happiness, lv APH 

Frank, Lawrence K. Nature and human nature; man's new image of himself. 2v 19 $1 AP' 
A book which seeks to restate in terms of modern living, man's self-image and 
world image. 
Grimm, Jacob and Wilhelm. Fairy tales. (Rainbow classic series) Uv 191*7 APH 
NUSGP 
.1, James Norman. The forgotten one, and other true tales of the South Seas. 
3v 1952 APH 

Six short stories about people of the South Seas islands whom the author knew 
during the early period of his thirty years' residence there. 
*Sq Henry, Marguerite. The little fellow, lv 19h5 APH NUSGP 
' A story about the daily life of roan colt. For grades three and four* 
W Jackson, William H. Time exposure. 3v 191*0 HP 

The autobiography of a pioneer American photographer. His career ranges from 
participation in the Civil War to the painting of murals at 92. 
4u) Kelland, Clarence Buddington. The great mail robbery. 3v 1950 BIA 
fa Lang, Don. Strawberry roan. 2v 19U6 APH NUSGP 

For animal lovers, aged eleven to fourteen, here is a wonderful story about 
a boy and his horse. 
ow McDonell, Gordon. The clocktower. 3v 1951 HP 

In a tiny principality high in the Himalayas, the Rajah tries to install a 
clock in the great tower he is building to the gods in order to insure the 
birth of a male heir. The storydeals with the reactions of the villagers. 
'vrdMason, F. Van Wyck. Himalayan assignment. Uv 1952 CPH 

A Colonel North novel of adventure and international intrigue in the Himalayan 
mountains. 
$< MS Morrah, Dermot. The royal family. 2v 1950 NIB Panda #11*5. Price 3s. NUSGP 
^oParker, Maude. The intriguer. 3v 1952 APH A detective story 
M^.Roark, Garland. Slant of the wild wind, kv 1952 APH 

A lusty, if improbable tale of sailing ship days in Australia. 



^ Saroyan, William. Tracy's tiger, lv 1951 



APH 



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A short fable about love, with a whimsical and inconsistent tiger for a hero 
and two ingenuous young people, Thomas Tracy and Laura Luthy, for the lovers. 
iSewell, Anna. Black beauty. 2v 19 1*6 APH NUSGP 
A classic children's story. 
<vtoSkornia, Harry J. and others. Creative broadcasting. 6v 1950 APH 

A valuable volume on radio broadcasting for beginners. Includes information 

— on music, copyright clearance, casting, sound effects, scripts and production, 

^ Skrine, Mary L. (M.J. Farrell, pseudonym) The enchanting witch. 3v 1951 APH 
In a mock-Gothic castle on the Irish coast, a charming but dominating mother 
who tries to arrange her children's love affairs, acknowledges defeat. 
Stokley, James. Science marches on. l*v 1951 APH 

A selection from the more than five hundred talks that have been presented on 
the General Electric Science Forum since 1939. 
A^ Stryker, Charlotte. Time for tapioca. 2v 1951 HP 

In 1927* the Stryker family went to Java to stay, while Mr. Stryker established 
a tapioca plantation and factory. The book covers the two years 1927-29. Not 
quaint or cute, but colorful and interesting. 
^VjSuckow, Ruth. Some others and myself, kv 1952 APH 

Seven sketches of Iowans, most of them women. As always, the author is more 
interested in capturing the essence of character than in plotting a story. 
Talmage, James E. A study of the Articles of Faith. 7v 191*9 APH Published for 
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah. NUSGP 
A consideration of the principal doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of 



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Teale, Edwin W. North with the spring; a naturalist's record of a 17,000 mile 
journey with the North American spring. Uv 1951 CPH 

A naturalist and his wife begin their search for the spring of the year in the 
Florida Everglades and follow it north, by easy stages, to the Canadian border 
^ Tracy, Ray. Fighting sheepman* 2v 1951 HP A western story. 
^^> Tunis, John R. Highpockets. 2v APH NUSGP A baeaball story. 

T Turkish language: Bible. Kitabi ukaddesten secme parcalar. (Scripture passages in 
Turkish braille.) Iv APH Published for American Bible Society, U50 Park 
js Avenue, New York, N.Y. NUSGP 

sr\ White, Nelia Gardner. Woman at the window, kv 1951 APH 

A small-town story involving two sisters: Anna, beautiful, acquisitive, cripple 
in an accident; Liz, who loves Anna, but understands her ruthless selfishness. 



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TALKING BOOKS 

Christie, Agatha. Mrs. McGinty's dead. 13r cl95l-52 AFB Read by Barry Doig 

A detective story. 
Coon> Carleton S. Caravan. 30r 1951 AFB Read by Alexander Scourby. 

The story of the middle east written by a well-known anthropologist. 
Cronin, A.J. Adventures in two worlds. 23r 1952 AFB Read by Noel Leslie. 

After selling his medical practice, the noted Scottish author tried his hand 

at writing and this is the absorbing tale of his immediate success. 
Disney, Doris M. Straw man. - 12r 1951 APH Read by George Patterson 

A detective story* 
Douglas, Lloyd C. Time to remember. 13r 1951 APH Read by George Barnes 

The first volume of a projected longer work, this portion of the author's auto 

biography covers his childhood, youth and college days, 
du Maurier, Daphne. My cousin Rachel. 25r 1952 AFB Read by John Brewster 

Philip Ashley, the narrator of this novel, receives Rachel in his Cornwall 

home, following the death of her husband. His heart is torn between his ad- 
miration and his suspicion that she may have poisoned her husband. 
Edman, Irwin. Under whatever sky. 13r 1951 AFB Read by John Knight 

Miniature essays on all sorts of subjects. 
Fischer, John. Master plan, U.S.A. l5r 1951 AFB Read by Sidney Walton 

An informal report on America's foreign policy and the men who make it. 
Freeman, Douglas S. George Washington: Vol. IV - Leader of the revolution. 

itOr 1951 APH Read by Walter Gerard 

The fourth volume in the monumental biography of George Washington. 
Garth, David. Fire on the wind. 32r 1951 APH Read by Kenneth Meeker 

Historical novel of life in the Great Lakes region in the period following 

the Civil War. 
Giles, Janice. Tara's healing. llir 1951 APH Read by Burt Blackwell. 

How a neurotic, disillusioned doctor finds a way of life among the simple, 

courageous Kentucky mountain folk. Completes "Piney Ridge" trilogy. 
Glidden, Frederick D. Play a lone hand. 9r 1951 APH Read by George Barnes 
Hobson, Jr., Richmond P. Grass beyond the mountains. 17r 1951 AFB Read by 

John Cannon 

Describes the experiences of the author and two companions in their search 

for grasslands in an unexplored region of British Columbia in the 1930' s. 
Houston, Margaret B. Bride' s island. 12r 195l AFB Read by Helen Shields 

A young girl's experiences during a year spent on a farm in the Texas of 

the 1880' s. 
Read, Opie P. A Kentucky colonel. I6r cl890 APH Read by Burt Blackwell 
Tomlinson, Henry M. The face of the earth. l5r 1951 APH Read by Sam Allgood 

A volume of essays containing hints for would-be travelers. 



NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE-- July h 9 1801; - May 19, I86I4 
From "American Authors, 1600-1900" 

Wathaniel Hawthorne, novelist and short-stccry writer, was born in Salem, Mass., 
the son of Nathaniel Hathorne and Elizabeth Clarke (Manning) Hathorne. Both his 
father and his mother came from a line of lean- jawed Puritans. On board the same 
ship that brought the charter of the Massachusetts Bay Colony from England was one 
Major William Hathorne; his son, a witchcraft judge, was the grandfather of Capt, 
Nathaniel Hathorne, (the father of the novelist), who was lost at sea when young 
Nathaniel was only four. Capt. Hathorne' s widow, whose forebears were prosperous 
stage-coach pioneers, became a grief -stricken recluse, stifled any predilection for 
maritime adventure that her child might have had, and, instead, encouraged him in 
his reading — The Faerie Queene , The Castle of Indolence , Pilgrim 1 s Progress, etc. 
At the age of nine the lad injured his leg in baseball, and sedentary pursuits be- 
came a delectable necessity. Three years later he was taken up into the Maine woods 
and was there exposed to normal, boyish life. So Arcadian was he, for a time, that 
at the mention of college, he wrote, "Oh no ... I was not born to vegetate forever 
... to live and die as calm and tranquil as— a puddle of water." Nevertheless, af- 
ter a brief siege of bookkeeping in his Uncle Richard Manning's coach office, his 
protests paled, and he was enrolled in the class of 1825 at Bowdoin. He appears to 
have shared very little campus life with Longfellow, three years his junior, but, 
rather, to have sought the confidences of Horatio Bridge and Franklin Pierce, who 
inhabited a breezy, practical, and hilarious world. 

Despite these friendships, four years at Bowdoin made Nathaniel only more ap- 
prehensive of any terrestrial plunge. After paying a fine to avoid taking part in 
commencement, he returned to sleepy Salem, and, changing the spelling of his name 
to Hawthorne, half-consciously resigned himself to a career of letters. He read 
voraciously in arid histories and books of obscure travels, took long walk© along 
Salem Neck, and occasionally climbed the steeple of Christ Church to peer down on 
the town beneath him. It was doubtless during his last year at Bowdoin that he had 
worked on "Seven Tales of My Native Land" — and then burned the manuscript. The 
following year he wrote Fanshawe (1828), and had it published anonymously and at his 
own expense ($100), But this ill-starred first novel projected neither the cold 
actualities of college life nor an idealistic illusion of such. Deeply chagrined, 
Hawthorne recalled what he could of the score or more sold copies, and pulled down 
the blinds of his "chamber under the eaves," Hwever, Samuel Griswold Goodrich, a 
Boston publisher and literary speculator, had perused a copy of Fanshawe , and in his 
1830 issue of the Token , printed the new author's "Young Provincial." Hawthorne was 
for several years an anonymous contributor to this annual. It was through Goodrich, 
too, that Hawthorne became the editor (1836) of The American Magazine of Useful and 
Entertaining Knowledge , a mushroom periodical; after four months of filler-writing, 
proof-reading and professional haggling he drew a pay check for twenty dollars. In 
March 1837 appeared the first series of Twice Told Tales , over the imprint of the 
American Stationers' Company to whom his old schoolfellow, Horatio Bridge, had given 
a guarantee of $2J>0. Of this selection from his magazine contributions Hawthorne 
later said: "They are not the talk of a secluded man with his own mind and heart., , 
but his attempts to open an intercourse with the world," The volume created little 
stir, but it was no such failure as Fanshawe , 

The market for short stories, at this time, was fairly accessible, but Hawthorne 
was still financially insecure. Through the intervention of a friend he was appoint- 
ed "measurer of salt, coal, etc." at the Boston Custom House, in Jan. 1839. He tried 
to regard this earthy and briny occupation as healthful discipline, but at the end 
of two years he voluntarily resigned. Over in West Roxbury the Transcendentalists 



were setting up their social community at Brook Farm, in the attempt to establish a 
happy liaison between sheer intellectualism and the humblest of manual labors. He 
joined the Brook Farm Institute in April 181*1 and made his final withdrawal in Nov- 
ember, eventually retrieving the amount due him on his $1000 purchase of stock. 
Within one year Hawthorne had made two conscious efforts to sound out the current 
of life, and had recoiled from both with impressions that were far from favorable. 

For some time Hawthorne had been writing letters of endearment to Sophia Pea- 
body, whose charm he had admired at the semi-intellectual "Saturday evenings at 
Miss Burley's." On July 9, 181*2, he and Sophia were married, and, taking the Old 
Manse, which for a century had been the Concord home of the Emersons and Ripleys, 
they retreated to a decidedly unearthy existence, living on simple fare and re- 
ceiving their rare callers with an unpropitious frigidity and eeriness. Emerson, 
whom Hawthorne considered a mere mystic, shared a little of this "molluscan habit," 
but only Henry Thoreau, at Walden, could match it. 

When the Samuel Ripleys returned to Concord in 18U5, the Hawthornes were oblig- 
ed to surrender the Manse and move to Salem. After refusing an appointment in the 
Charlestown Mavy Yard, Hawthorne accepted the surveyorship at the Salem Custom House 
in the spring of I8I460 Among ladings of pepper from Sumatra, wool from Nova Scotia, 
etc., he was slightly happier than he had been at Long Wharf a few years before, but 
the dread of a slow hypnotism of apathy and an inability to write anything worthwhil 
made him regard his removal, in June 18U9, as an ill wind with a good mission. Of 
this he said, long afterward: "God bless my enemies, say IJ If it had not been for 
their kind services, I might have been in the Surveyor's room this day." Late in 
the year he moved his family — Una was now five and Julian three — to Lenox, in the 
western part of the state. The following April saw the publication of The Sca rlet 
Lett er. Since 1837, when he had written "Endicott and the Red Cross" he had often 
been tormented by a symbol — a scarlet "A", worn by an adulteress in that tale-s-which 
had, at last, worked its way into a full-length book. To offset the dolor of the 
piece, for which Hawthorne believed the reading public would have little appetite, 
he wrote a "familiar" prefatory essay on the Custom House. Two thousand copies of 
The Scarl et Letter were lapped up in ten days— his fretting had been quite un- 
necessary! 

During the winter of 18!?0-$1, Hawthorne was hard at work on The Hou s e of Seven 
Gables . He believed that "in writing a romance, a man is always ... careening on the 
utmost verge of a precipitous absurdity and the skill lies in coming as close as 
possible, without actually tumbling over." And he avoided "tumbling over," but the 
book had a milder popularity, at first, than T he Scar le t Let ter. 

Late in the spring of 1852 Havrthorne bought Bronson Alcott's "Hillside" in 
Concord, rechristened it the "Wayside" and there disciplined himself to the writing 
of a campaign biography of his old friend, now General Franklin Pierce, the Demo- 
cratic dark-horse nominee for the Presidency. The little volume could not have made 
many proselytes, but Pierce won by a large electoral plurality over his opponent, 
and Hawthorne accepted the lucrative consulship at Liverpool, In July 185>3 he and 
his family sailed from Boston on the "Niagara", saluted by guns on Castle Island. 
Just under fifty, he was, manifestly, in no literary decline, but for the fixing 
of his status among writers of imaginative fiction, virtually all the evidence was 
in. 



Quite naturally, Haitfthorne disliked the pent-up consular routine, and very 
shortly was writing, "I am sick of it ... and long for my hillside — and — my pen." 
In the summer of 185>7 he submitted his resignation and declared himself "no longer 



a servant t " Nevertheless, he had an abhorrence of returning to Concord. In the 
course of a leisurely tour of England, he reinforced his rather bigoted impressions 
of the British, "sodden in strong beer," whose conversation he declared was "some- 
thing like a plum pudding, as heavy, but seldom so rich." Early in 1858 he left 
for the Continent, spent ten days in France, and then proceeded to Rome. Italy, 
"a sort of poetic fairy precinct," was the inevitable source of The Marble Faun . 
He returned to England, remaining until ths summer of i860, when he sailed for the 
United States and made his home at the Wayside. 

In 1862 Hawthorne journeyed to Washington and the following year saw the pub- 
lication of Our Old Home, a collection of Atlantic articles which had been culled 
from the fertile and well-turned passages of his English journals. That Hawthorne 
insisted upon dedicating the book to Pierce, whose southern sympathies were anathema 
to countless potential buyers, is a high testimony of his devotion to an old friend. 
He started for New York and Philadelphia with William Ticknor, in March 186U, but 
the trip was brought to a close by the untimely death of his companion. In the 
second week of May he set out with Pierce for New Hampshire and the rejuvenating 
air of the White Mountains. They took lodgings in Pemigewasset House, near Plymouth, 
and here Hawthorne died in sleep, early in the morning of May 19 • Emerson, who was 
among the pallbearers at the funeral, wrote in his journal on the day following, 
"... there was a tragic element ... in the painful solitude of the man which, I 
suppose, could not longer be endured, and he died of it." 

That "painful solitude" had indeed been "endured"— in fact, nourished— since 
Hawthorne was a boy and it had gotten a hardy growth in his earliest surroundings. 
As the years went on, it was heightened by his own awareness of it and the harrow- 
ing effects of his own efforts to emerge from it and to identify himself with any 
of the main currents of life* In England and on the Continent he was, perhaps, even 
more of a spiritual alien, an onlooker, and when he returned to Concord that same 
sense of isolation became a pathological timidity. "Mr. Hawthorne," wrote Sophia to 
Pierce in the spring of '6U, "intended to make a covenant with you ... that you will 
not introduce him to any persons, especially not to any ladies during his absence." 
Things real and kinetic, such as the awful events of the Civil War, made him fear- 
ful and bewildered. In one of his letters to Pierce, dated December 3> 1861, he saic 
"But perhaps I am as much too despondent as he (a common friend) is too sanguine ... 
we are all ... as happy as the times will permit," 

There was something dusky and slightly foreign about Hawthorne's physiognomy- 
black, brilliant eyes, massive head, and well-cut features. His voice was full and 
rather caustic and he walked with the lunging gait of a sailor. High devotion to 
his contemplative cult did not prevent him from being a somewhat idolatrous father, 
and in his journal he faithfully recorded the everyday activities of his children, 
rounded off with light and hypothetical fragments of philosophy. Of Sophia he spoke 
in only endearing terms and his affection was, apparently, wholly returned. More- 
over, after Hawthorne's death, Sophia published his Passages From the American note- 
books and Passages from the English Note-books . Unfortunately, her reverence for 
the socially proper influenced her to revamp many phrases and passages— especially 
those disclosing any gloom, rusticity, or fondness for low company— leaving them 
much emasculated and often changed in meaning; her excessive modesty compelled her 
to lift out numerous vigorously candid expressions. Nevertheless, the note-books 
are invaluable autobiography, for the author's habits were hardly the kind to en- 
courage any Boswellian satellite. Hawthorne was, moreover, one of the so-called 
literary exiles who, once uprooted intellectually, could not survive transplanting: 
and this mental atrophy only aggravated his social isolation. The finest that he 
wrote was the noble enactment of his own tragic pride, a suave adjustment of unbend- 



8 



ing and confusing facts to a formula of half -real and sometimes grim enchantment. 
With polished intonations, Hawthorne, like Poe, translated the morbid aspect of 
the American spirit* 

Editor* s note: Among the author* s works the following are in braille or 
Talking Book form: 



Ambitious guest* Jr AFB (on back of record: Daudet, A* The last class) 

Best of Hawthorne. 35r AFB 

Celestial railroad 2r AFB (Recorded with Clemens, S*L. The recent great 

French duel.) 
Dr. Heidegger 1 s experiment and Ethan Brand 2r AFB 
The great carbuncle, lr AFB 

Qreat stone face and other tales of the White mountains, lv Gr.lJ- APH 
Great stone face, Howe f s masquerade, the white old maid, Mr. Higginbothom' s 
catastrophe. $t AFB 
House of seven gables. Uv Gr.lJ APH 
House of seven gables. 19r APH 
The marble faun, kv BIA 
The marble faun. 27r APH 
The scarlet letter. 17r APH 
Short stories, edited by N. Arvin. 5v CPH 
Tanglewood tales, lv Gr. lj APH 

Tanglewood tales for boys and girls} being a second wonder-book. 3v Gr.li APH 
Twice told tales 8v Gr.l£ APH 

About Nathaniel Hawthorne: 

Canby, Henry Seidel. Classic Americans, hv Gr.l§ APH 
Stewart, Randall. Nathaniel Hawthorne. 3v APH 
Von Doren, Mark. Nathaniel Hawthorne. l?r APH 



^ 






^ 



HAND-COPIED BOOKS 

This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Unless 
otherwise indicated, these books are in Grade 2. 

How to locate hand-copied books in libraries: Following each title in this 
list you will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are the 
abbreviations for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the librar- 
ies in which you will find the books. A key to these abbreviations, giving the 
names and addresses of each library is included in every January and June issue* 

Bates, Marston. The nature of natural history. 5v 1950 LC 

A survey of the whole field of natural history, showing the relationship be- 
tween living things and their environment. 

Crabb, Alfred Leland. A mockingbird sang at Chickamauga. J>v 19h9 NY Guild 

Historical novel about Chattanooga and the country around it in the summer of 
1863. The battle of Chickamauga as seen from the Confederate side is the focal 
point of the book. 

Day-Lewis, Cecil* Poetry for you* 2v 19ltf LC 

A book for boys and girls on the enjoyment of poetry. 

Deutsch, Helene. The psychology of womenj a psychoanalytic interpretation. 8v 
19UU NY Guild 



M 



I 



T\ 



fi 



/\ 






Fineman, Irving. Ruth. l*v 19149 NY Guild Also available as a Talking Book 

Novelized version of the life of Ruth, the Moabite, who followed her mother- 
in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after they had both been widowed. 

Foster, Genevieve. George Washington. Iv 191*9 NYPL 
A biography for readers age 8-12. 

Frankau, Pamela. Willow cabin. 6v 191*9 NY Guild 

The love story of a young Englishwoman who at twenty-two threw away her 
chances of a brilliant career to become the mistress of a man twice her age 

Gardner, Erie Stanley. The case of the dubious bridegroom, l*v 19h9 NY Guild 
A detective story. 

German text: Viebig, Clara. Der Gefangene. 2v NYPL Student library 

German texts Wadepuhl, Walter and Morgan, B.Q. l*v German braille Philadelphia 
Minimum standard German vocabulary. Includes glossaries, vocabularies. 

Green, Alan. What a bodyl Uv 19 U9 NY Guild A detective story. 

Hamlin, A.D.F. History of architecture. 8v 1895 NY Guild 

Hauser, Gaylord. Look younger, live longer. 5v 1950 NYPL 

lams, Jack. Death draws the line. l*v 191*9 NY Guild A detective story. 

Janeway, Elizabeth. The question of Gregory. 6v 19 1*9 NY Guild 

Psychological study of the effects of their only son's death in the war upon 
John and Ellen Gregory. 

Kennedy, Margaret. The feast. $v 1950 NY Guild Also available as a Talking Book 
A maid at a Cornish seaside hotel decided to give a picnic ("the feast") for 
three poor children who had narrowly escaped drowning. All the guests but 
seven attended the picnic, and these seven, representing the seven deadly 
sins, remained behind and faced retribution. 

Larralde, Elsa. My house is yours. Uv Gr. li 191*9 NY Guild 

The author describes her experiences in building a home in a tiny Mexican 
village near Cuernavaca. 

Lea, Tom. The brave bulls. Uv 191*9 LC Also available as a Talking Book 

A novel about bull fighting which succeeds in taking the reader inside the 
minds of the people intimately connected with bull fighting. The central 
character is Luis Bello, a Mexican bull fighter who must face the fact of 
his fear, and of the moment when fear must be conquered. 

Lofts, Norah. A calf for Venus. l*v 19l*9 NY Guild 

A novel describing a young doctor's unsuccessful efforts to rescue a waitress 
from a notorious nineteenth century coffee house. 

Lofts, Norah. Women in the Old Testament. 3v 19l*9 NY Guild Also available as a 
Talking Book 
Psychological portraits of twenty women mentioned in the Old Testament. 

Longstreet, Stephen. The Pedlocks. 8v 19 $1 NY Guild 

A long, opulent novel that chronicles the life of the members of a Jewish- 
American family from Civil War days to the present. 

Marquand, John P. Point of no return. lOv 19 1*9 NY Guild Also available as a 
Talking Book 

A novel about some decisive days in the life of Charles Gray. A satiric study 
of New York bankers. 

Mason, Van Wyck. Dardanelles derelict. l*v 19U9 NY Guild Also available as a 
Talking Book 
A Major North spy story set in modern day Turkey. 

Miller, Helen. Born strangers. £v 19U9 NY Guild Recently added to LC 
Chronicle of two pioneer families living in Michigan in the 181*0* s. 

Orwell, George. Nineteen eighty-four* $v 191*9 LC, Phila. Recently added to 
NY Guild 

A book that goes through the reader like an east wind, cracking the skin, open- 
ing sores, for this is a picture of a society in which the State has reached 
the limits of its control over the mind and will of the individual. 






10 



/ 



Oursler, Fulton, Why I know there is a God. 3v 19$0 NY Guild 

Biale, Norman Vincent* The art of real happiness. kv 1950 LC 

The minister of Marble Collegiate Church, the author is also a medical psychi- 
atrist* This book is based on his case histories. 

Short Stories, lv Phila. An anthology of recent magazine short stories. 

Stewart, George E* Man, an autobiography . kv 1°1|6 NY Guild 

Survey of man's progress from his origin as an ancient fish through the various 
stages of his physical and mental development. 

Stone, Clarence R. and Stone, Anne L. Easy new stories and easy first reader* 
lv Gr. lj 1932 Philadelphia 

Stuart, Frank S. City of the bees, kv 19k9 LC Also available as Talking Book 
The story of a year's life in a colony of wild bees, 
p Stuart, Jesse. Foretaste of glory. kv 19k& LC 

One night in I9I4I the residents of a small Kentucky town noticed a display of 
lights in the sky. Thinking Jbhat this signified the end of the world, the 
saints and the sinners reacted to their forthcoming end. 

Thurber, James. The thirteen clocks, lv 195b NY Guild 

Tilson, John Q. How to conduct a meeting, lv 1950 NYPL 

United States Department of Agriculture. Squab raising. Farmer's Bulletin #681* 
lv NYPL 

Walker, N« Haw vegetables and fruit juices, and their therapeutic use in specific 
ailments. 2v NYPL 

Washington, ■ Laurence* How to plan your financial security, kv 19k9 NYPL 

Weatherhead, Leslie D. The transforming friendship j a book about Jesus and our- 
selves, 2v 1931 IX) 






BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 



Volume 21 



September 19^2 



No, 8 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N, I. 



Braille Edition Provided by the U» S # Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the Editor, Diva Agostinelli 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. I. 



CONTENTS 
September 1952 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 



TALKING BOOKS 



ANNOUNCEMENTS: 
Literary Competition 
Braille "Guideposts" 



FRANCIS PARKMAN 
From "American Authors, 1600-1900" 



HAND-COPED BOOKS 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, September 1952 
PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Govern- 
ment unless otherwise noted. Copies of these Government- supplied books are placed 
in the twenty-eight regional libraries which serve the blind. Readers are re- 
quired to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of Congress to 
serve their respective territories. A list of these libraries and their territories 
appears regularly in the January and June numbers of the magazine. 

2h the list which follows, the book notations are based on information appear- 
ing in the "Book Review Digest" and other standard reference works. 

Alcott, Louisa May. Old fashioned girl. 2v I9k7 APH NUSGP 

The story of Polly, a little country girl who goes to the city to s tudy music. 

Author and journalists* handy market list. lv APH NUSGP 

Available from the Hadley Correspondence School for the Blind, 620 Lincoln 
Avenue, I/innetka, Illinois. 

Becker, Stephen. The season of the stranger. Uv 1951 APH 

The novel*s background is present-day life in China, The plot concerns the 
love of an American professor for a Chinese girl who, after his death, carrys 
out the beliefs for which he has died. 

Best, Herbert. Whistle, daughter , whistle. 5v 19h7 APH 

The Lake Champlain country is the background for this novel about a flirtatious 
young lady from Albany, sent to stay with her lively strong-willed grandmother 
who has plans for her granddaughter 1 s marriage, 

Bulfinch,T. A book of myths . lv 19^2 APH 
Selections from Bulfinch«s "Age of Fable" 

Chamberlain, Lewis B., compiler. Christmas carols and hymns— words only, lv APH 

Considine, Reverend Daniel S. J. Confidence in God 2v APH 

Published for the Xavier Society, 151 East 23 Street, New York 10, N. Y. NUSGP 

Coughlan, Selma and ! Donnell, Mabel. The wishing veils parallel primer; Alice and 
Jerry book. 2 pamphlets ' 19^3 APH 

Cowley, Malcom, Exile *s return; a literary odyssey of the 1920' sj new edition, 
lv 1951 APH 

A realistic portrait of an era that brought about a renaissance in American fic- 
tion and poetry. This new edition includes some authors not appearing in the 
first edition. 

Frazee, Steve Shining mountains. 2v 1951 HP 

The story of two groups of men, once Confederate and Union soldiers, who join in 
a mid-winter gold rush in the Colorado mountains. 

Gere, Frances K. Once upon a time in Egypt, lv Grade lj 1937 HP 

An authentic story of life in ancient Egypt during the Fourth Dynasty, which re- 
volves about the activities of Merib and Henutsen, children of a prince. For 
grades 5 - 1* 

Hayden, Ruth. The Braille code, a guide to grade three, for first year high schools 
lv 1918 ISB 

Holling, Holling C. The book of Indians. lv 1935 APH NUSGP 

Descriptive materials and stories about various types of Indians living in the 
United States, For children, grades 1-6. 

Jenkins, Lucy Howe. In His presence. Pamphlet APH 25$ each 

Published, John Milton Society, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y, NUSGP 
Selections of devotional readings and prayers taken from original and larger ink- 
print, edition of the same title. 

Judson, Clara Ingram, Abraham Lincoln, friend of the people. 2v 1950 APH 
A new biography for children grades 5 to 9» 



Laird, Helene. Nancy keeps house . 2v 19h7 APH 

The story of Nancy who learned how to keep house, from dishwashing to party 

giving* while her mother was in the hospital, ^or girls twelve or over. 
Marsh, Ngaio. Opening night. hv 1951 NIB Panda #1^7 NUSGP 

Itystery story* 
0»Farrell, Margaret G<> North of the great river, 2v I9k$ APH $5.00 

Published for the Minnesota Blind and Sight Saving School, Faribault. NUSGP 



The story book of foods from the fields, 
NUSGP 



lv 



NUSGI 



NUSGI 



Petersham, Maud and Miska, 

Grade lj 1936 APH 

Juvenile nonfiction. 
Petersham^ Maud and Miska. The s tory book of wheels, ships, trains, airships, 

lv Grade l£ "193i> APH NUSGP 

Juvenile nonfiction. 
Religious poemsj selected authors, Pamphlet APH $0$ 

Published for the John Milton Society, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York, N, Y. 
Rolt, Mary F. Bible stories for boys and girls, lv 19Ul APH $1.50 

Published for the John Milton Society, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
Simon, Philip J. Sight unseen, lv 1951 APH 

This is a true account of how Bernice Clifton discovered the value of a handicap 
Smith, Joseph. The pearl of great price, lv 1902 APH 

A selection from the revelations, translations, and narrations of Joseph Smith, 
Smith, Nila Banton, From sea to sea$ learning to readj third reader, 2v 19^5 ^ 
Smith, Nila B,, and others. Through the gates learning to readj primer. 

3 panphlets 19b$ APH 
Standard hymns, 2v APH Price $1.50— lots of ten 

Published for John Milton Society, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. NUSGP 

This includes words only. 
Torrey, Marjorie. Artie and the princess, lv 19^5 APH 

A fairy tale for moderns. 
Tritten, Charles. Heidi grows up. 2v 1938 APH Juvenile fiction. 
Turnbull, Agnes Sligh. The gown of glory. hv 1952 APH 

A delightful novel about life in a Presbyterian ministers home in Pennsylvania 

at the turn of the century, 
Wiggin, Kate Dougilas and Smith, Nora A. The posy ring. 3v 1903 APH NUSGI 

Verse for children. 
Wilder, Laura Ihgalls. The long winter, 3v 191+0 APH 

This semi-autobiographical story which children will enjoy, tells of the Ingall 

family* s experiences in the hard winter of 1880 in Dakota. 
Winkler, Max. A penny from heaven. 3v 1951 APH 

This author came to America at the age of 19. A lucky penny lands him a job 

with a music publisher where he worked his way up to a career as an independent 

music publisher. 



TALKING BOOKS 



Bacon, Peggy* The inward eye. 20r 1952 AFB Read by Helen Shields 
Mystery story, 

Barry, Henry. I»ll be seeing you. 7r 1952 AFB Read by William Lazar 

A blinded veteran of World War II describes his climb back to health and securi- 
ty. He discusses his first reactions to being blind, his hospital experiences, 
his rehabilitation and his job. 

Buchan, Laura and Allen, Jerry. Hearth in the snow. l5r 1952 APH 
Read by Mrs. Dale Carter 

An account of life in an Eskimo village in Alaska based on letters written by 
Laura Buchan to her friend, Jerry Allen, The story tells of a delayed honey- 
moon which brought them to Juneau and to jobs as schoolteachers in a settlement 
on Bering Strait. 



Carey, Ernestine Gilbreth, Jumping Jupiter. 13r 1952 AFB Read by Anne 

Seymour 

A story of life and politics behind the scenes in a big department store, 
Ccwles, Fleur, Bloody pre cedent » 20r 1952 AFB Read by Luis Van Rooten 

An American journalist compares the present regime in Argentina with the rule of 

Juan Rosas, a nineteenth century dictator. 
English, 0. Spurgeon and Foster, Constance J. Fathers are parents, too. 17r 

1951 APH Read by Lamar Crask 

The author, a professor of psychology, gives suggestions to fathers shotting how 

they may contribute to the mental health of the family. 
Fry, Christopher, The lady's not for burning, kr 1950 AFB Read by the 

full cast of the play 

A comedy, s et in the year lliOO, about a man who confesses to a murder he did 

not commit, and a woman condemned to be burned as a witch, 
Furman, Bess. White House profile. 27r 1951 AFB Read by Carl Emory 

A s ocial history of the White House from the days of Dolly Madison to those of 

Bess Truman. 
Eliot, T* S The cocktail party. 3* 1950 AFB Read by the full cast. 

A poetic drama about modern marriage by England 1 s leading living poet. 
Fergusson, Erna. New Mexico. 22r 1951 APH Read by William Gladden 

A book in three sections $ the first deals with the history of the Indians of 

New Mexico up to the present, the second with the Spaniards and the third with 

the Anglo-Americans. 
Herbert, Arthur, pseudonym. Freedom run. lOr 1951 APH Read by Lamar Crask 

This story of the Far West in the 1870 f s tells how the hero of the author's 

earlier novel, "Bugles in the Night," helps to repel an invasion of California 

by Russians after our purchase of Alaska. 
Hughes, Margaret Mary, editor. The people in your life. l5r 1951 AFB 

Read by Kermit Murdock 

A compilation of outstanding essays on human relationships, prepared under the 

auspices of Town Hall, New York. 
Innes, Hsmmond, pseudonym. Air bridge. 19r 1951 APH Read by Kenneth Meeker 

Neil Fraser, former R«A t F« pilot, presently a fugitive from the police, becomes 

involved with Bill Seaton, who is trying to perfect a fuel-saving engine to use 

on the Berlin airlift. 
Jaques, Florence Page, As far as the Yukon. 12r 1951 APH Read by Terry 

Hayes Sales 

Mrs, Jaques, with her illustrator husband takes a trip to Alaska via New Orleans, 

Southwest and the Pacific coast. Some features are their hobbies, narrow gauge 

railroads, birds, wild flowers, and forests. 
Miller, Arthur, The death of a salesman. hr 19h9 AFB Read by the full 

cast of the play 

The broadway success about the disillusionment of a man who devoted mis life 

to "selling," 
Mowat, Farley. People of the deer, 21r 1951 APH Read by Walter Gerard 

A young Canadian who recalls memories of the caribou spends two summers in the 

Barrens west of Hudson Bay, He became the friend and indignant partisan of a 

fast-dying race of Eskimos, the People of the Deer. 
Cakes, Maud, Beyond the windy place. l8r 1951 APH Read by Terry Hayes Sales 

Miss Oakes lived for almost two years as the only white person in the Indian 

village of Todos Santos, in a remote section of the mountains in Guatemala, Her 

purpose was to s tudy local survivals of the Mayan religion, and she became a 

trusted and accepte d member of their community. 
Price, Willard. I cannot rest from travel, 22r 195l APH Read by William 

Gladden 

An autobiography of adventure in seventy lands over a forty-year period. 



i 



i 



Raine, William M. Challenge to danger, 13r 19h7 AFB Read by Don MacLaughlin 

Ripley, Dillon. Search for the spiny babbler. 17r 1952 APH Read by Milton Met: 
The author, and his associates, under the auspices of several institutes, ac- 
count'" a bird and small mammal collecting expedition in Nepal in 19^8, an area 
formerly closed to foreigners,* 

Sedges, John. Bright precession. l5r 1951 AFB Read by Kermit Murdock 
Character study of a New York public relations counsel which accounts his life 
with two wives and his children, and their struggles to adjust to present day 
living. 

Stover, Herbert E« Powder mission. 17r 1951 APH Read by George Barnes 
An historical novel of the American Revolution dealing with an expedition down 
the rivers from Fort Pitt to New Orleans to get gold and powder for Washington's 
army. 

Van der Post, Laurens. Venture to the interior. l£r 1951 APH Read by Milton 
Met2 

A fascinating book of travel and adventure by a distinguished British soldier and 
author. He tells of his trip from London to %-asaland in southeast Africa and of 
two expeditions into the interior of the latter. 

A LITERARY COMPETITION 

The "Jewish Braille Review" announces its eighth International Literary Compe- 
tition which is open to the blind throughout the world, ^he closing date of this 
contest is November 30, 1952. For those who are interested in participating, a set 
of competition rules may be secured from the Editor of the "Jewish Braille Review," 
Mr. Leopold Dubov, I8I46 Harrison Avenue, New York 53, N. t, 

BRAILLE GUIDEJ'OSTS 

An anthology of twelve "Guidjsjjosts" stories, brailled by the New York Association 
for the Blind, is available on loan through the New York Library for the Blind, 137 
West 25th Street, New York 1, N. Y. 

FRANCIS PARKMAN — September 16, 1823 - November 8, 1893 
From "American Authors, 1600-1900" 



Francis Parkman, historian, was the oldest of the six children of the Reverend 
Francis Parkman, a Unitarian minister, and Caroline (Hall) Parkman. An inheritance 
from his paternal grandfather, a merchant, enabled him to devote his life to litera- 
ture. H e was a frail child and spent part of his early years with his maternal 
grandfather in Medfordj at twelve he returned to Boston and prepared for Harvard at 
the advanced (for the times) Chauncy-Hall School, His college career was interrupted 
by illness and a consequent trip to Europe, but he secured his B«A e in I8U1 and his 
LL.B. in I8ii6. He never intended to practice law, however, and was never admitted 
to the bar. Already he was interested in the Indians, and had mapped out his scheme 
to write "the history of the American forest." But his first published writing was 
a series of sketches on his European tour, in the "Knickerbocker Magazine" in l8it5« 

In 181;6 Parkman made his famous journey on the Oregon Trail, living for months 
with and in the manner of the Indians. He brought back all the material for his first 



and what many consider his greatest work. It is usual also to say that his journey 
was the root of the invalidism which wasted his entire later life. It probably had 
nothing to do with it} the trouble seems to have been more a neurosis than a func- 
tional disorder© He was unable to bear light, could open his eyes only in darkness, 
and exhibited half a dozen other highly suggestive symptoms. Freud not yet having 
been born, the doctors did the best they could with Parkman, which was nothing at 
all. He himself, with undaunted courage, invented a machine to write legibly with- 
out sight, dictated most of his work, and at the rate of six lines a day, completed, 
by 1851, his "Conspiracy of Pontiac," first of the series of books intended to de- 
pict the struggle between the French and English in America, including the part 
played by the 2hdians c The series was gradually written in sequence, except that 
"Montcalm and Wclfe" anticipated its chronological order because Parkman wanted to 
write this climax, and was afraid he might die before he got to it 

Meanwhile, able to write only under such difficulties, he developed a new pro- 
fession; he became a horticulturist in West Roxbury, raised flowers, made new varie- 
ties, for a year was partner in a flower-selling business which failed, and in 1871 
and 1872 was professor of horticulture at the ' Bussey Institution, Harvard. His bool 
on roses was long a standard texts he was president of the Massachusetts Horticulture 
Si Society, and as proud of that honor as of his vice presidency of the Massachusetts 
Historical Society or his fellowship in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 
or membership in the Royal Historical Society of Great Brit.aia. As a matter of fact, 
his books sold very badly, in spite of their spreading reputation, and he was obligee 
even with a private fortune, to find other means of adding to his income. In 185Q 
he had married Catherine Scollay Bigelow, who died in 1858, together with their son, 
leaving two small daughters. He supported them, but sent them to Mrs. Parkman *s re- 
latives, while he lived with his own. It was at this time, in the severest gf his 
mental and nervous crisis, that Parkman went to Paris to consult the famous Brown- 
Sequard, and was told that he might live six months. He lived thirty-five years, and 
continued to write until a few months before his death. He finally died, not of his 
nervous disorder, but of peritonitis. 

Parkman was condemned by his constitution and the state of medical science in 
his day to live as a semi-invalid, but he was never a recluse. H e was overseer of 
Harvard from 1868 to 1371 and from iQlk to 1876, a fellow of the corporation of Har- 
vard from 1875 to 1888, and one of the founders of the Archaeological Institute of 
America in 1879» Besides his books, he wrote frequent magazine articles, mostly for 
the "Atlantic" or the 'Worth American Review." He even wrote a novel, though not a 
very good one, as he himself realized. There was plenty of the spirit left of the 
boy who had been an athlete, the young man who had eaten and slept and hunted with 
the Sioux. Behind his queer lopsided face, with its jutting chin, long nose, and 
deep-set little eyes, there was the soul of an artist. For Parkman more than most 
historians was essentially a producer of liter ature a He had wanted "to paint the 
forest and its tenants in true and vivid colors,"' to "imbue himself with the life anc 
spirit of the time," and though he was one of the earliest writers of American histoi 
to undertake the critical use of original sources and documents, he never lost sight 
of the living quality in his subject. It is easy to find minor fault with Parkman— 
his neglect of the economic background, the episodic, fragmentary character of his 
treatment^ but he laid a grand foundation, and it is hard to think of any history of 
the Northwest that does not depend on "The Oregon Trail," or of Canada and the French 
Middlewest that does not have behind it the volumes from "The Conspiracy of Pontiac" 
to "A Half Century of Conflict." And he has one other glory; he was the first Ameri* 
can writer not to glorify or romanticize the Indians, but actually to understand them 
and describe them as they were. H e accomplished the purpose of his boyhood plans. 



Editor's note: 
Talking Book f orm: 



Among the author's works the following are in braille or 



The Conspiracy of Pontiac. 7v CPH 

Count Frontenac and New France under Louis XIV, 5v APH 

A half century of conflict; Vol. I and II. 6v APH 

La Salle and the discovery of the Great West. far HBP 

Montcalm and Wolfe. Vol. I and II, 9v APH 

Montcalm and Wolfe. Vol. I and II. ijOr AFB 

The old regime in Canada, far UBP 

The Oregon trail. 3v APH 

The Oregon trail'. 20r AFB 

Pioneers of France in the New World. far UBP 



HAND-COPIED BOOKS 



This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Un- 
less otherwise indicated, these books are in Grade 2. 

How to locate hand-copied books in libraries s Following each title in this 
list you will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are the 
abbreviations for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the libraries 
in which you will find the books. A key to these abbreviations, giving the names anc 
addresses of each library is included in every January and June issue. 

Black, Max. Critical thinking. 7v 19h6 WFL 

A textbook for an elementary course in logic. 
Bonnet, Theodore. The Mudlark. Grade lj 5v 19h9 Chicago ilso available 

as Talking Book. 

A dirty little street urchin was fired with ambition to see Queen Victoria. One 

night he actually saw the Queen. Later he was discovered in the throne room. 

The situation was delicately manipulated by Disraeli so that Victoria finally 

emerged from her retirement. 
Buff, Mary M. Dancing Cloud; the Navajo boy. Grade l| lv 1937 Chicago 

A children's story that brings to life the everyday experiences of a little Navajo 

boy and his sister. 
Cadell, Elizabeth, Sun in the morning. yr 1?50 NYPL 

Light story for older girls who like exotic characters and atmosphere. The hero- 
ines are three young girls 5 the scene: Calcutta, 
Carter, Annie B, In a herb garden. 3v Grade lj ±9hl Chicago 

Chronicles one full season in the author's herb garden from March through November 
Corbett, Elizabeth. The Duke's daughter. 5>v Grade l| 1950 Chicago 

A novel Eve who had lost two husbands and her beloved father whom she called the 

Duke. 
Cove, Joseph W. (Lexris Gibbs, pseudonym.) Sheridan: his life and his theatre. 

5v 19li8 NY Guild 

A sympathetic study of the eighteenth-century playwright who, for the greater part 

of his life, managed to bring off the apparently irreconcilable roles of theater 

manager and active Parliamentarian. 
Crawford, Percy. The art of fishing for men. 2v Grade l| 19% Philadelphia 
Curtis, Francis D. Biology in daily life. 9v 19^0 NIPL 

Includes a glossary of terms. 
Duhamel, George. Les Jumeaux de Vallangowjard, 6v I9I4O Philadelphia 
Everts, Lillian. About poetry; reprinted from "Writers* Journal." lv NYPL 
Everts, Lillian. Everyone with something to say can write; articles reprinted from 

""Writers' Journal." lv NYPL 
Field, Peter. Outlaw valley. 3v Grade lj 19^9 Chicago A western story 



8 

Fisher, Anne. It*s a wise child. hv 19h9 NY Guild Recently added LC 
A light novel about the theme of doubtful paternity. 

Gerahty, Digby G, (Robert Standish, pseudonym) Elephant walk. 5v 19h9 NY GuT 
Tom Carey, an English planter in Ceylon, builds a huge house in defiance of na- 
tive tradition on a spot which for centuries belonged to the elephants. The ele- 
phants revenge form the climax which alters the lives of the characters. 



German language: Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von. Egmont, 



3v Philadelphia 
1938 Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 



liv 1928 Philadelphia 
and h 9 music, instrumentation and orchestration, project 

Philadelphia 



Also available 



Cleveland, Perkins, Chicago. 
1950 



2v 



NY Guild 



German text: Schinnerer, O.P. Beginning German. 7v 
Greek language: Bible. New Testament. St. Luke lv 
Harris, F. B. The blossoning bough. lv Grade l| 

Text of a sermon. 
Heacox, Arthur. E Project lessons in orchestration. 

Vol. 1 and 3 text; vol 2 

method in teaching. 
Kang, Younghill, The grass roof. 8v 1950 

A study of Korean customs and social life. 
Kemberton, Harry P. Now that summer's come. Ijv 19 f>0 NYPL 

Light fiction about life in a Connecticut summer colony. The characters include 

a visiting siren from Texas, a girl who was never married and assailed city dwel- 
lers' and natives, 
Kipling, Rudyard. Just so stories. 2v Grade 1§ Philadelphia 

Talking Book. 
Knight, Eric M. Lassie come home. hv 19h0 

Recently added to Philadelphia . 
Lincoln, Miriam, M.D. You 1 11 live through it. 

A study which attempts to dispel the many myths surrounding the menopause in 

women. 
Lyon, Elinor. Wishing water gate. 3v 19h9 NYPL 

Mystery story for boys and girls. 
Mahabharata, Bhagavadgita. Bhagavadgita, the song of God) tr. by Swami Prabhavanda 

and Christopher Isherwood, xd.th an introduction by Aldous Huxley. 2v 19hh 

NYPL- 
Mauldin, William Henry (Bill). A sort of saga. iiv Grade 1§ 19^9 Chicago 

Also available ac Talking Book. 

Account of a boyhood spent in New Mexico and Arizona. Pop is a sort of eccentric, 

more hero tham ham. A moving book without the superficial slickness of so many 

of the "I remember" books. 
Meader, Stephen W. Jonathan goes west. 3v Grade ij- Chicago 

A novel for older boys. 
Peale, Norman Vincent. A guide to confident living. liv 19hQ LC 

Dr. Peale discusses in his book his work in the consultation service conducted by 

the Marble Collegiate Church. He discusses particularly emotional problems and 

how to overcome them. 
Pearson, Haydn S. Success on the small farm. 5>v Grade lj 19h6 Chicago 
Plato. ' Selections from the Republic Bacchae and Prometheus, (B. Jowett translation) 

2v Philadelphia 
Renick, Marion. The Dooleys play ball. 2v 

Sports fiction for older boys. 
Runbeck, Margaret Lee. Answer without ceasing. 

A book about the power of faith and prayer. 
Shallabarger, Samuel. Prince of foxes. 9v 

as Talking Book. 

A romantic novel about the Renaissance period in Italy. 
Sherman, Richard. A kindred spirit. 2v 1951 NYPL 

A middle-aged writer of whodunits suddenly realizes how aimless her life is. 

Discovering in a lending library a W» Brown whose reading tastes are her own, she 

falls in love with him, although she never sees him. Charming at first, the mood 

grcws tense, mounting to shock at the tragic end. 



Grade l| 19^9 

7v Grade lj 

19U7 



Chicago 
19h9 



Chicago 



NY Guild Also available J. 



lv Gradel-: 



lv Phila 
Phila, 



Smith, Alson J. Faith to live by. 3v 19l*9 NYPL 

Sondergaard, Arensa. A history of the United States for young people. 

19Jbl Chicago 
Stubbs, Harry C, (Hal Clement, pseudonym) (< i*v 19i*9 KYPL 

A detective story in a science-fiction setting. 
Terence. The Brothers/ (From the "Complete Roman Drama" by Duckworth), 
Terence. Phormeo. (From the "Complete Roman Drama" by Duckworth), lv 
Tunis, " John B. The kid from Romkinsville, 3v 19h0 NYPL 

Sports story for older boys. 
U» S. Agriculture Department. The guinea fowl, lv NYPL 

Government Publication, Farmers* Bulletin, #1391 • 
Wallace, Dillon. Lure of the Labrador wild. £v 190J> Philadelphia 
Waugh, Evelyn. Scott-King's modern Europe. lv 191*9 Chicago Recently added 

to Philadelphia. 
Welles, Sumner. We need not fail. 2v I9I48 LC 
Williams, J, H. Elephant Bill, 5v 195b LC 

The author was an elephant manager in Burma for twenty-five years. The book is 

a delightful account of elephants and their exploits in hauling teakwoccfc * out of 

the forests. 
Winslow, Anne Goodwin. Xt was like this. 3v 19^9 Philadelphia 

A love story of nineteenth century Mississippi. 
Wornum, Miriam. Portrait in the dark. 3v 195b LC 

Out of the overnight state of mind of a woman newly widowed comes the whole mater i 

al of this novel , 
Annixter, Paul. Swiftwater, 3v 1950 LC 

Transcribed by Mrs. Mabel R. Smith. NY Guild, recently added LC, Also available 

as Talking Book, 

The story of the Calloways, father and son, and their love of the life of a north- 
ern Maine village. The boy succeeds in his ambition to establish a bird sanctury. 
Barbour, Thomas. Naturalis at large, 5v 1923 Philadelphia, recently added LC . 

Autobiography of the Director of the Harvard University Museum, His experiences 

are told in a delightful manner. 
Barkins, Evelyn W, The doctor has a family. 3v 19$0 LC 



A sequel to "The doctor has a bab&" the author describes family j l£ e with three 
children and their expansion from a city apartment. to a suburban Blandingesque 
house yet unbuilt, and the differences between life in the two situations. 

Barton, Margaret. 7v 19i$ LC 

A biography Of the great eighteenth century actor who was said to have restored 
Shakespeare *s plays to the London stage and liace them pay, 

Benda, Julien, The treason of the intellectual*? (La Trahxson des clercs) trans- 
lated by Richard Aldington, 3v 1928 LC 

Intellectuals, nationalism and nationality, and modern philosophy are the main 
treatises in this book. 

Benet, James, W. A private killing, hv 19k9 LC Mystery story. 

Benson, Sally. Meet me in St. Louis. 3v 19U2 NYPL, recently added LC 

Anecdotes of Smith family life in St. Louis in 1903-«U. Much of the story surroundt 
six-year-old Tootie, youngest of the Smith girls. 

Brittain, Vera M. Born 192§; a novel of youth. 6v 19l*9 LC 

A novel based on a theme of conflict between two generations, father and son. 
Only after his death does Adrian, a child refugee sent to Are rica, who returns to 
England to fight in World War II, appreciate his London minister father. 

Bulfinch, Thomas, The age of fable. 3v 19l# LC 

Stories of the Gods of Greece and Rome, the deities of Egypt, and the eastern and 
Hindu mythology. 

Carr, John D. A graveyard to let. itv 19^9 LC A detective story. 



10, 



Cranston, Ruth. World faith; the story of the religions of the United Nations. 

kv 19k9 LC 

The author presents an account of the great world religions in siirple form for 

laymen of all faiths, 3h the author's opinion, if we are to achieve a world 

society, all nations and races must appreciate and understand each others 

philosophy of life and basis ideals. 
Day, Albert Edward. The faith we live. Ipv 19iiO LC 

The Fondr en Lectures for I9I1O, the author, pastor of the First Methodist Church 

in Pasadena, California, discusses in terms of psychology and experience the 

availability of God in present-day human problems. 
Day, John Franklin. East of Katahdin. 2v 19h9 LC 
DuMaurier, Daphne. The parasites. 6v 191*9 LC Also available as Talking 

Book 

The story of a stepbrother and two sisters each with a minor gift inherited 

from talented parents, each somehow satisfied with falling short of creative 

achievement, dependent on one another, and shutting out close relations with the 

rest of the world. The story opens on the Sunday in the country when Charles. 

Maria* s husband, calls them all parasites— leaves them to recall the past and 

ends the day by asking Maria for a divorce. 
Edward VIII, King of Great Britain. A King's story; the memoirs of the Duke of 

Windsor. 10 v 1951 LC Also available as Talking Book. 

This autobiography covers the years from the Duke's birth to his abduction from 

the throne of England in 1936. 
Eklund, Jane M» The only gift, kv 19h9 LC 

Family life in a Chicago well-to-do household. Mrs. Lemming relates the events 

which occur when each of her five children depart within one year. 
Falkenburg, Jinx. Jinx, ' liv '1951 LC 

A well-known television, radio, moviet and stage personality tells her life 

story from her birth in Barcelona, Spain, to the present in New York, 
Fox, Paul Hervey. The daughter of Jairus. 2v 1951 LC Also available 

as Talking Book 

An appealing story based on one of Christ's miracles, the raising from the 

dead of the daughter of Jairus. 
Ghose, Sudhindra Nath, And gazelles leaping, 3v 19U9 LC 

Fictionalized autobiography of a Hindu child with an account of his search for 

Nravashi-Divine Beauty— which he felt he had found when he heard the Negro 

spiritual "Deep River" sung, 
Godden, Jon. The peacock, 3v 1950 LC 

A novel with a tragic note about a woman loved by four men, one of whom is her 

husband* The scene is a hunting camp. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 



Volume 21 



October 1952 



No, 9 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the U. S, Government 

Through the Library of Congress 

and 

Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 

1839 Frankfort Avenue 

Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the Editor, Diva Agostinelli 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N„ Y e 



CONTENTS 
October 1952 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 



TALKING BOOKS 



HUGH WALPOLE 
(1884-1941) 



BOOKS ON PIANO TUNING 



HAND-COPIED BOOKS 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, October - 1952 
PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Govern- 
ment unless otherwise noted. Copies of these Government-supplied books are placed 
in the twenty-eight regional libraries which serve the blind. Readers are required 
to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of Congress to serve 
their respective territories. A list of these libraries and their territories ap- 
pears regularly in the January and June numbers of the magazine. 

In the list which follows, the book notations are based on information appear- 
ing in the "Book Review Digest" and other standard reference works. 

Anderson, Hans Christian. Fairy tales. 4v APH NUSGP Available at NYPL 
Atkinson, qt^ 113 " The twin cousins. 3v 1951 HP 

A romance of life in and around Catskill, New York, after the Revolution, A 

story of Luther Ware, his wife, and Luther's cousin's widowed wife, and the inn 

they built on the Susquehanna Turnpike. Good reviews. 
Barney, Helen C. Fruit in his season. 2v 1951 HP 

A novel of eighteenth century Virginia and Ohio frontiers concerning Quakers who 

object to the slavery law and set out for the free territory of Ohio. Their 

faith carries them through many hardships, including epidemics and troubles with 

Indians . 
Clemens, Samuel L. (Mark Twain, pseudonym) Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. 4v 

APH NUSGP Available at NYPL Also available as Talking Book. 
Clemens, Samuel L. The adventures of Tom Sawyer. 3v APH NUSGP Available at NYPL 

Also available as Talking Book. 
DeAngeli, Marguerite. Yonie Wondernose; for three little wondernoses, Nina, David, 
and Kiki. Pamphlet 1944 APH NUSGP 
A story for children aged 6-10. 
Ernst, Margaret. More about words. lv 1951 APH 

Brief essays on the origins of some 230 English words, enjoyably informative. 
Everitt, Charles P. The adventures of a treasure hunter; a rare bookman in search 

of American history. 3v 1951 aPH 

Anecdotes and reminiscences of a famous dealer in Americana, in the book business 

for more than fifty years. 
Field, Eugene. Poems of childhood. 2v APH NUSGP Available at NYPL 
Flack, Marjorie and Wiese, Kurt. The story about Ping. Pamphlet 1933 APH NUSGP 
Fortenbaugh, Robert and Tarman, H. James. The Pennsylvania story. 5v 1949 APH 

Published for Overbrook School for the Blind, 64th Street and Malvern Avenue, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. NUSGP 
Grimm, Fairy tales. 4v APH NUSGP Available at NYPL 
Hildreth, Gertrude, and others. Along the way; Easy Growth in Reading Series, 

Second Reader, level One. lv 1951 APH NUSGP 
Hildreth, Gertrude, and others. Fun in story; Easy Growth in Reading Series. 

2 pamphlets 1947 APH NUSGP 
Hildreth, Gertrude, and others. Going to school; Easy Growth in Reading Series. 

Pamphlet 1947 APH NUSGP 
Hildreth, Gertrude, and others. Good stories; Easy growth in Reading Series, Pre- 

Second Reader. 2v 1951 aPH NUSGP 
Hildreth, Gertrude, and others. I know a secret; Easy Growth in Reading Series, 

Level One. 2v 1951 APH NUSGP 
Hildreth, Gertrude, and others. Mac and Muff; Easy Growth in Reading Series. 

Pamphlet 1947 APH NUSGP 
Hildreth, Gertrude, and others. The twins, Tom and Don; Easy Rrowth in Reading 

Series. Pamphlet 1947 APH NUSGP 



Kennedy, Marguerite W. My home on the range. 3v 1951 BIA 

An account of the author's childhood in the West and her first years of marriage 
on a 120,000 acre ranch in Arizona. 

Lathrop, Dorothy. The angel in the woods. Pamphlet 1947 APH tfJSGP 

A Christmas story about the adventures of a toy angel who flew out of the window 
into the woods to bring Christmas $oy to the animals there. 

Moses, "Grandma." My life's history. lv 1952 HP 

A delightful story which begins with Grandma Moses ' childhood and continues 
through her discovery of artistic talents at the age of eighty. 

O'Brien, Jack. Silver Chief to the rescue. 2v 1937 APH NUSGP 
Available at NYPL 

Rinehart, Mary Roberts, The swimming pool. 4v 1952 BIA Detective story 

Ritner, Ann. Keepsake. 4v 1952 CPH 

Ruskin, John, The king of the golden river. lv APH NUSGP Available at NYPL 
Children's fairy tale. 

Sharp, Margery. Lise Lillywhite. 3v 1951 APH 

Another good novel of Miss Sharp's, this one deals with a beautiful seventeen- 
year-old girl who defies her relatives and arranges her future to suit herself. 
Excellent reviews. 

Stapp, Emilie B. Isabella's goose village. lv 1950 APH NUSGP 

Stevenson, Robert Louis. A child's garden of verses. lv 1905 APH NUSGP 

Strange, John Stephen, pseudonym. Deadly beloved. 2v 1952 APH Detective story 

Stuart, Frank S. Wild wings. 2v 1951 HP 

Tale of a flock of wild ducks, describing their migration from southern England 
in the spring to their breeding grounds in the North. 

Wayland, John W. History stories for primary grades. 2v 1919 APH NUSGP 

Westcott, Jan. Captain Barney. 4v 1951 BIA 

An historical novel about an American naval captain and his part in the Revolu- 
tionary War. 

Widdemer, Margaret. Lady of the Mohawks. 4v 1951 BIA 

An historical novel based on the love story of Molly Bryant and Colonel Johnson 
at the time of the French and Indian wars. 

Yates, El^abeth, Brave interval. 3v 1952 APH 

Five people, each facing a problem, take a pack trip in the wilderness of the 
Smoky Mountains, accompanied by a leader and guide. The trip brings hardships 
but also contentment to all five. 

TALKING BOOKS 



Beiderwieden, George. Heaven. 2r 1937 APH Read by Paul Clark NUSGP 

Recorded for Lutheran Library for the Blind, 3482 East Boulevard, Cleveland, Ohio 

Costain, Thomas B. The silver chalice. 42r 1952 AFB Read by Alexander 
Scourby 
A religious tale woven around the cup used by Christ at the Last Supper. 

Dodge, David. To catch a thief. 13r 1951 APH Read by Milton Metz 
Detective story 

Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan. Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. 20r 1892 AFB Read 
by John Brewster 

Fair, A. A., pseudonym. Top of the heap. llr 1952 APH Read by William 
Gladden Detective story 

Forester, C. S. Lieutenant Hornblower. 17r 1952 APH Read by Burt Blackwell 
The seventh novel in the saga of Horatio Hornblower, in which the central char- 
acter emerges from his apprenticeship as midshipman to assume the responsibilitie 
thrust upon him by the fortunes of war between Napoleon and Spain. 

Hecklemann, Charles N. The rawhider. 13r 1952 APH Read by Livingston 
Gilbert 



London, Jack. The call 
by William Lazar 



M; 



aier 



of the wild and other stories. 12r 1903 AFB Read 



NUSGP 



Walter A. Living for Christ. 4r APH Read by the author 
Recorded for the Trinity Lutheran Church. A series of sermans. 

Malone, Dumas. Jefferson and the rights of man (Book II — Jefferson and His Time) 
36r 1951 APH Read by Paul Clark 

The second volume of a four-volume project devoted to Jefferson begins with the 
European mission at the beginning of the French Revolution, and ends with Jeffer- 
son's having served all but his final year as our first Secretary of State under 
the new Constitution. 

Mumford, Lewis. The conduct of life, 25r 1951 APH Read by George Barnes 
The final volume of a series, in which the author proposes a new philosophy to 
counteract current social breakdown. Its starting point is human life— its goal, 
the restoration of the complete human personality. 

NUsen, Frieda R. Eyes of understanding. fir 1947 APH Read by Dorothy Belgum 
NUSGP Recorded for Christian Lending Library for the Blind, Faribault, Minn. 

Pellegrini, Angelo. Immigrant's return. 19r 1951 APH Read by Burt Blackwell 
An autobiography of a thirteen-year-old boy. Italian immigrant, his youth in the 
Northwest and return to Italy as a college professor on a Guggenheim fellowship. 

Stump, Joseph. Bible teachings. 14r 1902 APH Read by John Engebretsen MEGP 
Recorded for Christian Lending Library for the Blind, Faribault, Minnesota. 

Williams, Albert N f Book by my side; in: introductbgn Henry Sloane Coffin, D.D. 
23r 1951' APH Read by Walter Gerard 

The story of the sixty-six books of the Bible— their authorship, historical set- 
ting, how they were collected, their content, and religious meaning. 



HUGH WALPOLE 
(1884—1941) 

From a review by James Stern of "Hugh Walpole," by R, Hart-Davis, 
which appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, August 24, 1952. 

The life of Hugh Walpole is a "success" story— a triumphant career of ceaseless 
activity reminiscent more of America than of England, This country, indeed, fell 
for him at first sight, and forever remained uncritical. Such was the novelist's 
fame during his first American lecture tour (from which, aged 35, he earned more 
than $30,000) that a newspaper announced the arrival of the French clown Grock in 
New York with the headline: "King George and English novelist Hugh Walpole say he 
is funniest clown alive," 



What was the cause of this writer's immense popularity? From early manhood 
Hugh Walpole was determined to be— and, what's more, succeeded in being— happy. De- 
spite the fact that he had suffered more than most boys from the proverbial hell of 
an English school — where he ("Tadpole"), like Scheherazade, managed to forestall 
torture by telling his persecutors endless stories of adventure, despite the fact 
that he remained all his life a bachelor and yet considered marriage "the finest re- 
lationship of all," Walpole nevertheless, from his nineteenth year until death at 
fifty-seven, was so consciously happy that his journal is filled with references 
to this enviable state. 

And yet: "Would I be a better artist," he asks himself one day after listen- 
ing to his friend Joseph Conrad cursing his unhappy lot, "if I weren't so happy?" 
But instantly he is capable of dismissing the thought: "I'm not a genius, so why 
worry?" 



^ . '' 5 

If Walpole did not exactly worry about the quality of his work (nearly 60 vol- 
umes in 32 years), it was not altogether fair of some critics to accuse him of com- 
placency. "I'd rather be a male Hugh Walpole to a female Virginia Woolf than any- 
thing else on earth," he once confided to his diary. In the "shop" of world liter- 
ature he rated his fiction "third class" — in the company of Charles Kingsley, Gas- 
kell, Gissing, Maugham. He then raises an eyebrow t^ ask: "Do I put the goods too 
high?" 

It was as much this humility, this awareness of his own limitations, his ex- 
pressed recognition of and reverence for his superiors, as his vitality, his bounc- 
ing boyish enthusiasm, his capacity for "enjoying everything he did," that earned 
for Walpole the affection of that vast circle of friends for which all his life he 
so passionately craved. 

After a disastrous six months as a schoolmaster, the young Hugh decided that 
he was unfit to follow in the footsteps of his clergyman father: he would become 
a novelist. As the motto for his first novel, he chose this sentence from Jean Paul: 
"He loved every dog, and wanted every dog to love him." Little could the youth have 
known that as a key to the life of Hugh Walpole, no words more fitting could be 
found. To few aspiring writers can the magic casements have opened so suddenly or 
so wide. 



Inside one month of the year 1909, Hugh had found a room in London for which 
he paid the present equivalent of fifty-five cents a week, he had landed two jour- 
nalistic jobs bringing him in five pounds a week, he had had that first novel ac- 
cepted, and — of infinitely greater significance — he had dined alone with Henry James. 
This meeting, like many more with celebrities, was the direct result of a "fan-letter," 
and led to an intimate relationship lasting until the death of "My very dear Master." 

Walpole could never resist the habit of Writing to Authors. It was one of his 
ways of making friends, whom he collected (listing them every New Year's in order 
of preference) as in later life he collected rare books and paintings. He was soon 
enjoying a teaparty with "H. J.", John Galsworthy and Mrs. Belloc Lowndes — "all 
friends;" Edmund Gosse was taking "a fatherly interest" in him, and H. G. Wells was 
referring to him as "this child;" he was on "Darling Arnold— Sweet Hughie" terms 
with the author of "The Old Wives' Tale," being photographed with Kipling, and find- 
ing himself the only untitled week-end guest in a great English country house. Wal- 
pole also wrote to Reviewers, notably to Katherine Mansfield and Rebecca West, both 
of whom were frankly critical of his works. 

Of Walpole' s works, the first to catch the eye of the reading public was his 
third novel, "Mr. Perrin and Mr. Traill" — a quite violent attack, for its time, on 
the English educational system. It is surprising, however — considering its many 
passages of platitudinous prose, its laughably feeble "love" scene, its "happy end- 
ing" so clearly designed to please — that this novel should have been judged one of 
Walpole 's "most successful as a work of Art." 

It is more significant than surprising, perhaps, that the author himself, even 
toward the end of his life, should have described "Mr. Perrin" as the Ptruest" of 
his books. What he meant, no doubt, was that this novel was one of his very few 
whose . '• . material had been drawn, not from his imagination, but from life. Here- 
in lay ufalpole's weakness as an artist. He was born not a "writer," but story- 
teller. No sooner had he thought of one story for a novel than his imagination pro- 
duced three more, all of them demanding to be written before the first was half- 
finished. 



Like Trollope (whom he constantly re-read), he could rarely lay down his pen. 
When he did, he became "apprehensive" — a reflex, one is tempted to assume, of the 
child whose "sheer, stark, unblinking Terror" of the school bullies had taught him 
to tell endless stories in the dormitory at night. With such a dawn to life it is 
little wonder, perhaps, that the novelist should have found himself compelled to 
entertain the world rather than perfect his art. 

That this compulsion earned for him the popularity he craved was due to his 
determination, his lovable personality; that he attained fame in so few years and 
on so wide a scale he hadtothaikthe century in which he lived and to which he was 
so admirably suited. 



Editor's nets: 
Talking Book form: 



Among the author's works the following are in braille or 



All souls' night; a collection of short stories. 5v Sacramento 

Anthony Trollope. 4v Grade lj NYPL 

The blind man's house. 4v CPH 

The bright pavilions. 5v BIA 

Captain Nicholas. 4v BIA 

The cathedral. 8v St. Louis, LC 

The cathedral. 28r AFB 

The Duchess of Wrexe. 6v NYPL 

Fortitude. 6v NYPL 

The fortress. lOv NYPL 

The green mirror. 4v APH 

The inquisitor. 5v APH 

Jeremy, 7v Grade lj HP 

Jeremy and Hamlet. 6v Grade ij NYPL 

Jeremy at Cr a le. 4v Grade lj LC, Seattle, NYPL 

Judith Paris. 9v Grade lj NYPL 

Katherine Christian. 4v BIA 

The old ladies. 4v Sacramento, Cincinnati 

Portrait of a young man with red hair. 2v Grade lj BIA 

A prayer for my son. 3v APH 

Rogue Herries, 9v Grade lj NYPL 

The sea tower. 4v NYPL 

Selected stories from The Silver Thorn. lv Grade lj NYPL 

Vanessa. 6b BIA 

Wintersmoon. lOv Grade lj NYPL Sacramento, Cleveland, Portland 

The young enchanted. 7v Grade lj NYPL 



BOOKS ON PIANO TUNING 

Cox, C. G. Notes on piano tuning, regulating, repairing. lv Grade lj APH 

Cox, C. G. Player regulating and adjusting. lv Grade lj APH 

Faast, 0. C, Pianoforte tuner's pocket companion. lv APH 

Fowler, S. H. Regulation in the home of the grand piano action. lv Grade lj 

Cleveland, Perkins 
Layton, P. E, Pianoforte tuning; an occupation for the blind and how to make it 

one of the most successful. lv NIB 
Principles of player action operation. lv Perkins, Pittsburgh, NYPL 



Rowed, Henry. Mathematics of tuning. lv NIB 

A series of articles on pianoforte and organ tuning and famous builders of English 

organs; reprinted from "The Musical Magazine." lv NIB 
Smith, T. H. M. Pianoforte tuning and repairs; written for the use of blind tuners. 

lv NIB 
Standard piano action. lv Grade lg .APH 
Stephenson, H. G. Tuner's manual. 2v Grade l| Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, 

Perkins, NYPL 
Theory of piano tuning, containing notes on harmony, acoustics and temperament. 

lv APH 
White, W, B. Piano tuning and allied arts. Revised edition. 3v APH 



HAND-COPOISD BOOKS 



This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Un- 
less otherwise indicated, these books are in Grade 2. 

How to locate hand-copied books in libraries: Following each title in this 
list you will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are the 
abbreviations for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the librar- 
ies in which you will find the books. A key to these abbreviations, giving the 
names and addresses of each library is included in every January and June issue, 

Godden, Rumer. A breath of air. 4v 1951 LC Also available as Talking Book 
A kind of modern "Tempest," the scene of which is a remote Pacific island. A 
Scotch earl is the modern despot, his daughter Charis the Miranda. The novel de- 
scribes the arrival of two English airmen, forced down by a storm on a nearby 
island, and the effects their arrival had on Charis, her father, and the natives. 

Gunther, John. The riddle of Mac Arthur; Japan, Korea, and the Far East. 7v 
1951 LC 

A character study of the General, combined with the author's analysis of the 
Korean problem. The preparation for this book took place just before the out- 
break of hostilities on Korea. Fair review. 

Harding, R. B. Blind Tom ("Atlantic Monthly," July-December, 1862) together with 
Trotter, James M. : Thomas Greene Bethune; music and some highly musical people, 
lv LC 
Stories of the famous musical genius who astonished the world. 

Kon-Tiki: across the Pacific by raft. Translated by F. H. Lyon. 
Also available as Talking Book 
A now-famous account of the author's experimental voyage by balsa log raft to 
the Polynesian Islands to prove the possibility of such a trip by the Peruvian 
people of the Stone Age. 

Hoover, Kathleen 0. Makers of opera. 5v 1948 LC 

Eighteen essays on the lives and works of some of the major operatic composers, 
from Jacopo Peri to Richard Strauss. "The author concentrates on the genesis of 
operatic works, describing a composer's relation to his librettist, comparing 
initial jottings and first drafts with final revisions." Saturday Review of 
Literature. 



Heyerdahl, Thor. 
5v 1950 LC 



The blue ribbon. 4v 



Hopley-Woolrich, Cornell George (William Irish, pseydonym) . 

A collection of short stories. Contents: The blue ribbon; The dog with the 
wooden leg; The lie; Hot towel; Wardrobe trunk; Wild Bill Hiccup; Subway; Husband 
Hurston, Zora Neale. Seraph on the Suwanee, a novel. 7v 1948 LC 
Janeway, Elizabeth. The question of Gregory. 7v 1949 NY Guild 

The psychological study of the effects not only for the war death of John and 
Ellen Gregory's son, John, but also that of President Roosevelt. 



8 

Kimbrough, Emily. The innocents from Indiana. 3v 1950 LC 

Reminiscences of the author T s childhood in Chicago and her change over at eleven 
from "hayseed in Indiana" to city ways. 

Leopold, Aldo. A Sand County almanac, and sketches here and there. 3v 1949 LC 
Essays of the delights and dilemmas of one who cannot live without nature's wild 
life. 

Beasley, Norman. Politics has no morals. 4v 1949 NY Guild, recently added LC 
A controversial book which delves into the recent past for reasons why the coun- 
try at present is in such a state, and which looks ahead to see how our errors 
could be rectified. 

Becker, Robert, It's easy to raise and train a puppy in your house or apartment. 
2v 1950 LC 

Bernard, Jean- Jacques. Nationals 6. 2v 1950 NY Guild 

Bernstein, Philip Sidney. What the Jews believe. 2v 1950 LC 
An expansion of an article written for "Life Magazine" in 1950. 

Coatsworth, Elizabeth Jane. The enchanted, an incredible tale. 2v 1951 LC 
A fantasy about a young Main farmer, living on the edge of a wood called "The 
Enchanted." Although, he is warned about his jolly neighbors, the Perdry fami- 
ly, Dave marries Molly Perdry, and almost lives to regret it. 

Cooper, Sir Duff. Operation heartbreak. 2v 1951 NY Guild, recently added LC 
Story of an English army man, too young to fight in the first world war, too 
old to fight in the second, who, in death achieved his deepest ambition, to be 
of service to his country in war. 

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The great Gatsby, 3v 1925 LC 

One of Mr. Fitzgerald's best novels which typifies the life of the 1920' s boom 
period. 

Hickey, James C. Introducing the universe. 2v 1951 LC Also available as 
Talking Book 

This introductory study of astronomy for young people describes the solar system, 
individual planets, stars, comets, meteors, constellations, swarming asteroids, 
and zodiacal light. 

Hinkley, Laura L. ...Ladies of literature. 6v 1947 LC 

Biographical and critical studies of six English women authors: Fanny Burneyj 
Jane Austin; Charlotte and Emily Bronte; Elizabeth Barrett Browning; and George 
Eliot. 

Kennedy, Margaret. The feast. 6v 1950 NY Guild, recently added LC Also 
available as Talking Book 

A maid in a Cornish seaside hotel gives a picnic for three poor children who had 
narrowly escaped drowning. All the goodhearted hotel guests attended the feast, 
but seven people, representing the seven deadly sins who had remained at the 
hotel were killed when a crumbling cliff side destroyed the building. 

Kennelly, Ardyth. The spur. 6v 1951 LC Also available as Talking Book 
Novel based on the last six days of John Wilkes Booth's life, the days when he 
was dying after his assassination of Lincoln, During those harrowing days Booth 
reviews his twenty-six years of life, showing how he arrived at his terrible 
decision to kill the President. Good reviews. 

Keyes, Kenneth S. How to develop your thinking ability. 3v 1950 LC 

Guide to the development of improved habits of thinking. The emphasis is on 
the importance of recognizing the limitations of what we already know. Anecdotes 
included. 

MacDonald, Betty. Anybody can do anything. 4v 1950 LC Also available as 
Talking Book 

The author of "The Egg and I" describes her experiences and those of her sister's, 
job hunting and losing during the depression. 

Marshall, Katherine. Together; annals of an army wife. 5v 1947 LC Also 
available as Talking Book 



Recollections of the wife of General Marshall, from their marriage in 1930 to 
the time of his departure as Special Ambassadorial Envoy to China. An intimate 
picture of the woman's side of U. S. Army life; of social functions at Army 
posts and of official Washington during the war; of housekeeping problems, and 
war work. 

Miracle at Carville. 5v 1950 LC Also available as Talking 



Martin, Betty. 
Book 

An autobiography of a 
or Hansen's disease. 



New Orleans girl who at nineteen discovered she had leprosy, 
This is her account of the next twenty years of hopes, 
grief, and dedication to a life of experiment and help to others. 

Masters, John. Night runners of Bengal, a novel. 6v 1951 LC 

An historical novel, based on the Indian mutiny of 1857. The author, Calcutta- 
born, is the fifth successive generation of his family to serve in India. 

Moore, Olga. I'll meet you in the lobby. 5v 1950 LC 
• Autobiography of a Wyoming girl, in which she describes her background, college 
days, and work on various newspapers, and life in Washington, where she and her 
husband lived and where she now functions as a lobbyist. 

Nash, Ogden. Family reunion. 2v 1950 LC 

A selection of Nash's verses over the past twenty years put together to make a 
book for the family. 

Nathan, Robert. The innocent Eve. 2v 1951 LC 

Another good novel by Mr. Nathan, this is fantasy in which Luther and his secre- 
tary Samantha crash a Halloween party at a swank New York City hotel in 1948. 
At the party a scheme of Lucifer's concerning a certain project is upset by 
Samantha who is the opposite of innocent. 

O'Faolain, Sean. A summer in Italy. 5v 1950 LC 

A rambling commentary on a 1948 tour of north and central Italy, the Irish au- 
thor's observations on people, architecture and art are unusually interesting, 
as is his habit of inserting Irish contrasts. 

Papashvily, George and Helen. Thanks to Noah. 2v 1951 LC 

The authors of "Anything Can Happen" have produced a book about their animal 
friends. Animal lovers would like this. 

Paul, Louis. A husband for Mama. 5v 1950 LC 

Story about the Gaines family, long on the art of happiness and short on the 
value of money. The children's antics to supply "Mama" with a second husband 
are very amusing. 

Pearson, Haydn. That darned minister's son. 5v 1950 LC 

Mr. Pearson has produced a delightful volume about his amusing experiences as 
a minister's son in a New Hampshire rural community. Since his father supple- 
mented his income by farming, the author was afforded the opportunity to know 
the joys of a farm boy as well as the more austere life of a parsonage. 

Perry, George S. My Granny Van; the running battle of Rockdale, Texas. 3v 
1949 LC 

A skillful portrait of a tyrant, friend, doer-of -good-works, hypocondriac, Phila- 
delphia lawyer and child — all rolled into one: the author's Granny Van. 

Pfeiffer, Ehrenfried. Grow a garden and be self-sufficient. 2v 1942 NYPL 

Power, Eileen E. Medieval people. 4v 1950 LC Also available as Talking 
Book 

A series of sketches illustrating certain aspects of social life in the Middle 
Ages. From verious historical sources the author has reconstructed the life of 
a peasant on a country estate in Charlemagne *s time; a Venetian traveller of 
the thirteenth century; Madam Eglentyne, fourteenth century prioress; a Paris 
housewife in a middle class home; a merchant of the staple in the fifteenth 
century; an Essex clothier in the days of Henry VII. The book is enlivened with 
many touches of humor. 

Roeder, Bill. Jackie Robinson. 2v 1950 LC 

The life story of Jackie Robinson, famous second baseman of the Brooklyn Dodgers, 



10 



Fisby did. And the Colonel was eventual- 
Fair review, 
5v 1950 LC Also available as Talk- 



describing his struggle to get into the big league, because of his race, 
Rogers, Edward K. Doughboy chaplain. 4v 1946 LC 

This book is a personal account of a chaplain in World War II, 
Schmitz, Charles H. Windows toward God. 2v 1950 LC 

Devotional exercises. 
Smith, Mortimer B. And madly teach; a layman looks at public school education. 

2v 1949 LC 

A primer, written by a lay member of a board of education, on what parents 

should know about public schools. 
Sneider, Vern J. The Teahouse of the August Moon. 5v 1951 LC 

Captain Fisby of the Government team in Okinawa was presented with two geishas 

in return for a favor. The Captain was stunned at first, but recovered. What 

the ladies of the town didn f t think up, 

ly persuaded that Fisby 's way was best, 
Stinetorf, Louise A, White witch doctor. 

ing Book 

An exciting novel describing the life of an American medical missionary in the 

Belgian Congo. 
Thane, Elswyth. Melody, a romance. 3v 1950 LC 

A novel about the romantic entanglements of an aging British painter, with a 

fatal fascination for the ladies. 
Thurber, James. The thirteen clocks. lv 1950 NY Guild, recently added LC 
"A fairy tale not for children about a duke, so cold and cruel that time has 

frozen around him, who had imprisoned a beautiful princess in her castle, and 

about a prince who rescues her by performing a seemingly impossible task. " New 

Yorker' 
Vail, Derrick T, The truth about your eyes. 2v 1950 LC 

A description for the layman of the eye, its proper care, and diseases. The 

author is the editor-in-chief of the "American Journal of Ophthalmology." 
Walker, Mildred. The southwest corner. lv 1951 LC 

A short novel about an eighty-three year old widow, living in Vermont, who 

advertised for a companion for the winter. The story concerns the working out 

of that arrangement. 
Walker, Turnley. Rise up and walk. lv 1950 LC 

A personal account of one man's battle with polio, from his hospitalization 

to the day five months:, later when he could walk enough to be discharged. 

"Book-of-the-Month Club" selection. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 



Volume 21 



November 19^2 



No. 10 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed ffbrm 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N.Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the U.S. Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the Editor, Diva Agostinelli 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. T, 



CONTENTS 
November 1952 



• 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

TALKING BOOKS 

JANE AUSTEN 
From the "Encyclopedia Brittanica" 

A SELECTED LIST OP BOOKS ABOUT THE BLIND 

JAMES THURBER 
From "Twentieth Century Authors" 

HAND-COPIED BOOKS 






BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
November 1952 

PRESS-MADE BOOKS 



All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Govern- 
ment unless otherwise noted. Copies of these Government-supplied books are placed 
in the twenty-eight regional libraries which serve the blind. Readers are required 
to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of Congress to serve 
their respective territories. A list of these libraries and their territories ap- 
pears regularly in the January and June numbers of the magazine. 

In the list which follows, the book notations are based on information appear- 
ing in the "Book Review Digest" and other standard reference works. 

Arbuthnot, May H., compiler. Time for poetry; a teacher's anthology to accompany 
"The New Basic Readers, Curriculum Foundation Series." 5v 1951 APH NUSGP 
An anthology of children' s poems to be read aloud which was compiled for the 
purpose of stimulating children to read for themselves more and better poetry. 

Arnold, Elliott. Nose for news; Way of Life Series, lv 19U1 APH NUSGP 
The way of life of a reporter. 

Baker, Nina B. Cyclone in calico; the story of Mary Ann Bickerdyke. 3v 1952 CFH 
A biography of a Civil War nurse who was the first field hospital nurse in 
American military history. 

Buck, Pearl S. The hidden flower. 3v 19$ 2 APH 

A novel about a mixed marriage between a beautiful aristocratic Japanese girl 
and a member of a prominent Virginian family. The marriage, resented by both 
families, ends when Josui realizes the situation is impossible and goes back 
to life as a Japanese. 

Caldwell, Erskine. Call it experience; the years of learning how to write. 2v 
1951 HP 

A literary autobiography about the trials and tribulations of the author in his 
determination to make a living by his pen. Contains sidelights on personalities 
in the book world and gives forthright advice to all those interested in becom- 
ing writers. 

Clarke, Arthur C. The exploration of space. 2v 1951 HP 

The author is assistant secretary of the British Interplanetary Society, and has 
published another book, "Interplanetary Flight." 

Darling, Esther B. Boris, grandson of Baldy. 3v APH NUSGP Available NYPL 
Juvenile. 

DuBois, Theodora. Sarah Hall's sea god, 3v 1952 BIA 

A realistic and complicated fantasy concerning middle-aged Sarah Hill who finds 
Poseidon in her late husband's bedroom. Soon after, she, her niece and her 
grandson set sail with the water god in their cutter down the Inland Waterways 
to Florida. 

Gould, Jean. Jane (story of Jane Austen). 3v 19U7 APH NUSGP 

A story of the life of Jane Austen written for high school girls. This book 
which is a good introduction to Jane Austen' s novels also serves to acquaint 
the reader with the life of her times. 

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "A Wonder-Book" and "Tanglewood Tales." Uv 1923 APH 
NUSGP 
These two companion volumes are tales retold for children from classic mythology. 

Heinold, George. Burglar in the tree tops, yr 1952 CFH 

A fascinating account of the habits and behavior of sixteen North American wild 
animals and how they are hunted and manage to survive. 

Hildreth, Gertrude, and others. At play; Primer, Level One; Easy Growth in Reading 
Series. 2 pamphlets 19U7 APH NUSGP 

Hildreth, Gertrude, and others. The story road; Second Reader, Level Two; Easy 
Growth in Reading Series, lv 19U7 APH NUSGP 



Growing day by day; Health-Happiness-Success Series rl 
Dead as a dinosaur. 2v 1952 HP A Mr. and Mrs, 

3v 19UU BIA 



Holt, Felix. The Gabriel horn. 2v 195l HP 

A picaresque novel dealing with the westward trek of settlers and hunters during 

the early nineteenth century. Characters are Big Eli, who carries the Gabriel 

horn, Little Eli, his son, and the bound girl, Hannah. 
Irwin, Leslie W. , and others. Awake and away; Health-Happiness-Success Series: I. 

pamphlet 19 U7 APH NUSGP 
Irwin, Leslie ¥. , and others. 

lv 19U7 APH NUSGP 
Lockridge, Frances and Richard. 

North mystery. 
McCloskey, Frank H. How to write clearly and effectively. 

A guide to everyday writing in business and social life. 
Moore, Bertha B. The three Baers. lv 1938 APH Published for Braille Institute 

Free Circulating Library, 721 North Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles 29, California 

NUSGP 
Moore, Bertha B. The triplets go to camp, lv 1952 APH Published for Braille 

Institute Free Circulating Library NUSGP 
0' Donnell, Mabel. Open the door; 3rd Pre-Primer; New Alice and Jerry Books. 

pamphlet 19U7 APH NUSGP 
0' Donnell, Mabel. Skip along j 1st Pre-Primer; New Alice and Jerry Books, pamphlet 

19U7 AFH NUSGP 
0' Donnell, Mabel. Under the sky; 2d Pre-Primer; New Alice and Jerry Books. 

pamphlet 19U7 APH NUSGP 
0' Donnell, Mabel and Coughlan, Selma. High on a hill; Uth Pre-Primer; New Alice 

and Jerry Books, pamphlet 19U7 APH NUSGP 
Pei, Mario A. The story of language. 7v 19U9 APH 

The author, associate professor of romance languages at Columbia University, 

deals with the family relationship of languages, with dialects, place names, 

personal names, slang, cant, jargon, with the sounds and structures of languages. 

He describes all the modern spoken tongues and discusses problems of language 

learning. He writes of the tremendous influence of radio and talking pictures 

on language, one effect of which is to bring English and American together again. 
Randolph, Vance. We always lie to strangers. 3 V 195 1 BIA 

Tall tales of many kinds which originated in the Ozarks about oversize and under- 

size crops, ordinary and fantastic animals, and weather, 
Russell, David H., and others. Wings to adventure; Ginn Basic Readers; 6 

5v 19U9 APH NUSGP 
Scholes, Percy A, Lyrical and dance forms in pianoforte music; selected from 

"The Oxford Companion to Music," edited by H. V. Spanner, lv NIB Available 

NIPL 
Simenon, Georges. The strangers in the house, translated by Geoffrey Sainsbury from 

the French. 3v 1951 NIB Panda #lU8 Available NYPL 
Smith, Nila B, Bill and Susan; Pre- Primer 1; Learning to Read Series, pamphlet 

1916 APH NUSGP 
Smith, Nila B. In new places; Second Reader; Learning to Read Series, lv 19U5 

APH NUSGP 
Smith, Nila B, Under the tree; Pre-Primer 2; Learning to Read Series, pamphlet 

19U5 APH NUSGP 
Stevens, James. Timber 1 , the way of life in the lumber camps; Way of Life Series, 

lv 19U2 APH NUSGP 
Wash, Lula Mae. Braille grade two drill book, lv 1952 APH Published for Kentucky 

School for the Blind, Louisville, Kentucky NUSGP 

A book designed to teach braille grade two by means of drill on dot locations, 

letters, contractions, and abbreviations, singly and in groups, and a few brief 

stories of universal appeal but simplicity of vocabulary. 
Welchons, A.M., and Krickenberger, W.R. Algebra: book one; elementary course. 8v 

19U9 APH NUSGP 



TALKING BOOKS 



Collins, Wilkie. The woman in white. U7r AFB Read by John Knight 

The story of a woman who surmounted the prejudice against women in medicine and 

became the first woman to do internship in a hospital. 
Crawford, Marion. Elizabeth, the Queen; the story of Britain's new sovereign, 7r 

1952 APH Read by Terry Hayes Sales 

An unofficial biography of the new Queen of England, from babyhood to the news 

of the death of her father. 
Be Mille, Agnes. Dance to the piper. 25r 1951 AFB Read by the author and Sarah 

Burton 

This autobiography of the American ballerina and choreographer who created "Rodec 

and the ballets in "Carousel" and "Oklahoma I" gives a good picture of the develop 

ment of modern dance. 
Foote, Shelby. Shiloh. 8r 1952 AFH Read by Bud Abbott 

A novel about the battle of Shiloh as seen through the eyes of six soldiers, Unio; 

and Confederate. 
Guareschi, Giovanni. Don Camillo and his flock. 12r 193? 2 AFB Read by Alexander 

Scourby 

More episodes in the life of priest Don Camillo and his adversary, the Communist 

Mayor Peppone. 
Kirk, Lydia. Postmarked Moscow. 20r 1952 APH Read by Kay Parker 

Letters written while the author' s husband was American ambassador to Russia, 

19U9-1951. They describe Mrs. Kirk's personal observations, the daily happen- 
ings in the diplomatic colony, and the difficulties of keeping house in Russia. 

Non-political. 
Kossak, Zofia. The covenant. 30r 195l APH Read by Burt Blackwell 

A novel of the life of Abraham and his times based on the story of Abraham in 

Genesis. 
Krutch, Joseph W. The desert year* lOr 195l APH Read by Paul Clark 

Informal essays on the American Southwest desert country, the result of the 

author's fifteen month stay there. 
O'Hara, Mary. The son of Adam Wyngate. 32r 1952 APH Read by Kenneth Meeker 

The shock of learning of his wife's infidelity results in a nervous breakdown 

for the Episcopalian clergyman. The scene is set in the early 1900' s. 
Oursler, Fulton. The greatest book ever written. 29r 195l APH Read by Lamar 

Crask 

A companion volume to "The Greatest Story Ever Told," this is the Old Testament 

rewritten in narrative form. 
Reynolds, James. The grand wide way. 19r 1951 APH Read by Kenneth Meeker 

This novel's background is life among the upper classes in Ireland. 
Sabatini, Rafael. Captain Blood. 21r 1922 APH Read by Alexander Scourby 

One of the best known of the author's historical and adventure romances in 

English. 
Smith, Madeline B. The lemon jelly cake. lOr 1952 AFB Read by Helen Shields 

Life in a small town in Illinois at the turn of the century. 
Vining, Elizabeth G. Windows for the crown prince. 23r 1952 AFB Read by Mary 

Welch 

Account of the author' s four years at the Imperial Court of Japan where she was 

invited to teach English to the Crown Prince. A vivid picture of contemporary 

Japan. 
Williams, T. Harry. Lincoln and his generals. 19r 1952 APH Read by George 

Patterson 

Lincoln as a director of war, and his Influence in developing a modern command 

system for this nation. 
Zahl, Paul A. Flamingo hunt, llr 1952 AFB Read by Tony Randall 



5. 



JANE AUSTEN 
From the "Encyclopedia Brittanica" 



The English novelist, Jane Austen, was born on December 16, 1775* at th« 
parsonage of Steventon, in Hampshire, a village of which her father the Reverend 
George Austen, was rector. She was the youngest of seven children. The life of no 
woman of genius could have been more uneventful than Miss Austen's. She did not 
marry, and she never left home except on short visits, chiefly to Bath. Her first 
sixteen years were spent in the rectory at Steventon, where she began early to trifle 
with her pen, always jestingly, for family entertainment. Four years after the 
death of her father, in 1809, Jane, her mother and sisters moved to Chawton, near 
Alton, in Hampshire, and there Jans remained till l8l7# the year of her death. 

During her placid life Miss Austen never allowed her literary work to interfere 
with her domestic duties: sewing much and admirably, keeping house, writing many 
letters and reading aloud. Though, however, her days were quiet and her area circum- 
scribed, she saw enough of middle-class provincial society to find a basis on which 
her dramatic and humorous faculties might build, and such was her power of search- 
ing observation and her sympathetic imagination that there are not in English fic- 
tion more faithful representations of the life she knew than we possess in her novels. 
She had no predecessors in this genre. 

Her best-known, if not her best work, "Pride and Prejudice," was also her first. 
It was written between October, 1796 and August, 1797, although, such was the blind- 
ness of publishers, not issued until 1813, two years after "Sense and Sensibility," 
which was written on an old scenario called "Eleanor and Marianne," in 1797. Miss 
Austen' s inability to find a publisher for these stories, and for "Northanger Abbey" 
written in 1798, seems to have damped her ardour; for there is no evidence that be- 
tween 1798 and 1809 she wrote anything but the fragment called "The Watsons," after, 
which year she began to revise her early work for the press. Her other three books 
belong to a later date— "Mansfield Park," "Emma," and "Persuasion," being written 
between 1811 and l8l6. "Persuasion" and "Northanger Abbey" were published post- 
humously in 1818. All were anonymous, agreeably to their author's retiring disposi- 
tion. 

Although "Pride and Prejudice" is the novel which in the mind of the public 
is most intimately associated with Miss Austen' s name, both "Mansfield Park" and 
"Emma" are finer achievements— at once riper and richer and more elaborate. But the 
fact that "Pride and Prejudice" is more single-minded, that the love story of Eliza- 
beth Bennett and D'Arcy is not only OF the book but IS the book has given it its pop- 
ularity above the others among readers who are more interested by the course of ro- 
mance than by the exposition of character. Entirely satisfactory as is "Pride and 
Prejudice" so far as it goes, it is, however, thin beside the niceness of analysis 
of motives in "Emma" and the wonderful management of two housefuls of young lovers 
that is exhibited in "Mansfield Park." 

It has been generally agreed by the best critics that Miss Austen has never 
been approached in her own domain. No one indeed has attempted any close rivalry. 
No other novelist has so concerned herself or himself with the trivial daily comedy 
of small provincial family life, disdaining equally the assistance offered by pas- 
sion, crime and religion. Whatever Miss Austen may have thought privately of these 
favorite ingredients of fiction, she disregarded all alike when she took her pen in 
hand. Her interest was in life' s little perplexities of emotion and conduct; her 
gaze was steadily ironical. The most untoward event in any of her books is Louisa's 
fall from the Cobb at Lyme Regis, in "Persuasion"; the most abandoned, Maria's e- 
lopement with Crawford, in "Mansfield Park." In pure ironical humor Miss Austen's 
only peer among novelists is George Meredith, and indeed "Emma" may be said to be her 



6. 
"Egoist," or the "Egoist" his "Emma," But irony and fidelity to the fact alone 
would not have carried her down the ages. To these gifts she allied a perfect 
sense of dramatic progression and an admirably lucid and flowing prose style which 
makes her stories the easiest reading. 

Recognition came to Miss Austen slowly. It was not until the 1920 1 s that she 
became firmly established as an English classic. However, Miss Austen had always 
her panegyrists among the best intellects such as Coleridge, Tennyson, Macaulay, 
Scott, Sydney Smith, Disraeli and Archbishop Whately, the last of whom may be 
said to have been her discoverer. Disraeli read "Pride and Prejudice" seventeen 
times. Scott's testimony is often quoted: "That young lady had a talent for des- 
cribing the involvements, feelings and characters of ordinary life which is to me 
the most wonderful I have ever met with. The big bow-wow I can do myself like any- 
one going; but the exquisite touch which renders commonplace things and characters 
interesting from the truth of the description and the sentiment is denied to me." 



Editor's note: 
Talking Book form: 



Among the author* s works the following are in braille or 



Emma. £v APH 

Emma. 2 pts 3£r AFB Read by Carmen Mathews 
Mansfield Park. 6v NIB 
Northanger Abbey. 3v NIB 
Persuasion. 3v NIB 

Pride and Prejudice, 6v Grade !§• APH 
Pride and Prejudice, Uv NIB 

Pride and Prejudice, 2lr A FB Read by John Knight 
Sense and Sensibility. Uv APH 

Sense and Sensibility. 26r AEB Read by Carmen Mathews 
Biography: SEE: Gould, Jean in press-brailled list 

A SELECTED LIST OF BOOKS ABOUT THE BLIND 



Chevigny, Hector. My eyes have a cold nose, l6r 19U6 APH Read by Jean Clos 
The author describes what becoming blind in adult life has meant to him. 

Chevigny, Hector and Braverman, Sydell. The adjustment of the blind. 3v 195>0 HP 
"This book attempts a work of demolition of old fables about the emotional life 
of the blind; but it will seek, too, to add to our positive knowledge concern- 
ing the manner of physical and mental functioning in the blind," state the 
authors • 

Cuts forth, Thomas D. The blind in school and society. 3v 1933 APH 

Discusses the preschool blind child; verbalism; phantasy life of the blind; 
voice and speech; problems in their emotional life; their sex behavior and 
aesthetic life; personality problems in institutions for the blind; and social 
adjustment in a college community. 

Donahue, Wilma and Dabelstein, Donald, editors. Psychological diagnosis and counsel- 
ing of the adult blind; selected papers from the proceedings of the University 
of Michigan Conference for the Blind, 19h7» 3v 19^0 APH 

Somatopsychological aspects of blindness; mental hygiene of blindness; community 
and family problems related to adjustment of the blind; employer attitudes and 
the adjustment of the blind; the adjustment and employment of blind persons of 
limited employability; measuring the intelligence of the blind; mechanical 
and manual ability tests for use with the blind; a survey of projective techni- 
ques for use with the blind; a method for using the Minnesota Multiphasic Per- 
sonality Inventory with the blind; vocational counseling of the adult blind; 
needs and developments in psychological research for the blind. 



7. 

Fox, Monroe L. Blind adventure, lv 19U6 APH 

Fox, Monroe L. Blind adventure. 8r 19U6 APH Read by Morris Flournoy 

A blinded Navy veteran of World War II tells of his first year of blindness. 

French, Richard S. From Homer to Helen Keller. 3v 1932 APH 

A history of work for the blind from the days of Homer to the present time. 

Lende, Helga, editor. What of the blind? A survey of the development and scope 
of present day work with the blind (Vol. I): 3v 1938 APH Vol. II: 3v 19Ul 
APH 

A collection of papers in two volumes by experts in various fields of work with 
the blind. 

Merry, Ralph V. Problems in the education of visually handicapped children. 3v 
1933 APH 

This book attempts to evaluate what has been accomplished in the education of the* vis- 
ually handicapped child and to indicate some of the problems which as yet are 
unsolved. 

Ohnstad, Karsten. The world at my finger tips. 2lr 19U2 APH Read by Ernest Rea 
An autobiography of a young blind man. 

Ross, Ishbel. Journey into light. 3v 19£l HP 

Ross, Ishbel. Journey into light. 3v 195l AFB Read by Ethel Everett 

Aims at tracing the history of work with the blind through the years through the 
dramatic stories of the men and women who pioneered in this work. 

Simon, Philip J, Sigbx unseen; how Bernice Clifton discovered the value of a handi- 
cap, lv 19^1 APH Biography of a blind woman. 

Zahl, Paul A», editor. Blindness; modern approaches to the unseen environment, 7v 
19$0 HP 

A collection of thirty-four articles dealing with various phases of work with 
the blind, and grouped under the following chapter headings: history and welfare; 
education and psychology j vocational considerations; the military minded; time- 
tested boons to the blind; exploration of new technological horizons, and ophthal- 
mological factors. 

JAMES THURBER 
From "Twentieth Century Authors" 

James Thurber, American humorist and illustrator, was born in Columbus, Ohio 
in December, 189U. One need not take seriously all the family chronicles in "My 
Life and Hard Times," but the Thurbers seem to have been — and still are — a rather 
unusual family, with a penchant for getting into ludicrous predicaments. This pen- 
chant their second son has inherited in full measure; things are always happening 
to him, "but he also has the gift of seeing, uncloudedly, the ridiculous aspect" of 
these situations. He was educated at Ohio State University, entering in 1913, but 
not getting his degree until 1919, since he took one year off "just to read" and 
spent another in war service. Owing to a boyhood accident which cost him an eye, he 
was refused by the army, so he spent part of 1917 and 1918 as a code clerk, first 
in the Department of State in Washington, then in the American Embassy in Paris. 



He began as a newspaper man on the Columbus "Dispatch," and then on the Paris 
edition of the Chicago "Tribune." He stayed in Paris until 1926, when he returned 
to New York and started sending contributions to the "New Yorker." He met E.B. 
White, who took him up to the magazine to see if he could land Thurber a job 3 
Thurber emerged as managing editor. After six months he managed to shed that editor- 
ial responsibility, and was safe in the "Talk of the Town" department. In 1933 ho 
resigned from the staff (although he continued to contribute), and after sampling 
Bermuda, England, and Hollywood, he settled down in Connecticut and New York. In 
1922 he was married to Althea Adams; they had a daughter, and after his divorce he 
married Helen Wismer in 193li» 



8. 

Mr. Thurber drew long before he wrote. He draws all the time, in a sort of 
inspired doodling. His drawings are indescribable unless one knows them: "the huge, 
resigned dogs, the determined and sometimes frightening women, the globular men who 
try so hard to think so unsuccessfully." They are funny — but they are a psychologi- 
cal and social and sometimes a pathological commentary as well. Besides his own 
books, he has illustrated three others, on dogs, men's fashiois, and the English 
language. 

Very tall, very thin, absent-minded, shy, forgetful, Mr. Thurber looks as un- 
like his own drawings as anyone well can. He loves and raises dogs, but they are 
not the Great-Dane-cum-St. Bernards of his pictures. He still has eye trouble, and 
has undergone at least one serious operation. He is a nocturnal animal, who thinks 
best after midnight, and between his two marriages managed to disarrange his schedule 
until he was sleeping by day and working all night. 

In 19U0, in collaboration with Elliott Nugent, an old friend, he wrote his first 
play, "The Male Animal" (currently on Broadway, Ed.). He may or may not some day 
write others; to quote Stephen Vincent and Rosemary Benet, "he does not make blue- 
prints or outlines of future work." 

These same critics called Mr. Thurber "one of the most vigorous talents that 
has grown in the "New Yorker" greenhouse. . .A good many humorists get into a formula- 
he never has." The casual air of both his writing and his drawing is deceptive; he 
often rewrites a piece ten times, and has spent two years on a short book. Says 
Robert M. Coates, "he regards himself primarily as a writer, and is at once a little 
jealous of the Artist-Thurber and suspicious of anyone who admires the one in pre- 
ference to the other... He spent a long time building up his skill as a writer, and 
he still slaves over his work." There is an eerie, zany quality about his humor 
that hides a shiver under the laugh. He is consciously whistling in a graveyard: 
and the terror— which we all share — behind the mirth makes the mirth just so much 
the funnier. 



Editor' s note: 
Talking Book form: 



Among the author' s works the following are in braille and 



The beast in me and other animals; a new collection of pieces about human 

beings and less alarming creatures. 3v 19U8 AFH 
Fables for our time. 19U0 Chicago 

Is sex necessary? (co-author E.B. Whrte) 2v 1929 NY Guild 
Many moons, lv 19U3 NYPL 

Middle-aged man on the flying trapeze, 2v 1935 BIA 
My life and hard times. Ur 1933 AFB 

My world and welcome to it. lUr 1937 AFB Read by Kermit Murdock 
The thirteen clocks, lv 19^0 NY Guild 
The white deer. 2v 19hS NYPL 
The white deer. 6r 19b5> AFB Read by George Keane 



HAND-COPIED BOOKS 



This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Un- 
less otherwise indicated, these books are in Grade 2. 

Hand-copied books may be located in the libraries as follows: After each title 
in this list will be found either a group of initials or the name of a city. These 
are the abbreviations for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the 
libraries in which the books are located. A key to these abbreviations, giving the 
nanes and addresses of each library is included in every January and June issue. 



Caldwell, John. Desperate voyage. 5v 19 k9 Cleveland 

In this true adventure story, a young ex-merchant marine sets out all alone in a 
small 29-foot sailing craft on a voyage from Panama to Sydney, Australia — almost 
8500 miles. 

Carson, Rachel L. The sea around us. Uv 1950 NYPL Also available as Talking 
Book 

Based on geological evidence, this book is a study of the processes that formed 
the earth, moon, and oceans, and the part played by wind, sun and rotation of 
the earth on the tides and their importance in regulating climate. A book still 
enjoying popularity since its publication. 

Douglas, Emily T. Appleseed farm, lv 19 U8 Cleveland 

A simple and pleasing children's story of a pioneer family's debt to Johnny 
Appleseed. The enduring significance of his contribution is made clear by plac- 
ing a story of the early period within a story of a modern city child' s visit to 
her grandfather's farm. 

Du Jardin, Rosamond. Tomorrow will be fair. J>v 19U6 Cleveland 

A light sophisticated romance concerning Sherry Kent and her older sister Val, 
who differed in many respects. Val, bereft by war of the young man she truly 
loved, determined to forget the past and rebuild a new life, marries an older 
man. Sherry knew that she would never love anyone but Lex Morell, although she 
was aware that his regard for her was only a friendly one. 

Edmonds, Walter D. Wedding journey, lv 19U7 Cleveland 

Back in 1835 Roger and Bella Wilcox spent a three-and-one-half days' honeymoon 
travelling the Erie Canal from Schenectady to Buffalo. 

French language: Langellier, Alice and Paul. Ces gens qui passent. Uv 195l NYPL 

French language: Turgeon, Frederick K. Cours pratique de francais. 12v 1951 NYPL 

Frost, Frances M. Sleigh bells for Windy Foot. 2v 19U8 Cleveland 

On the 3a st day of school before Christmas vacation, the Clark family prepares 
for guests to their farm for the holidays. Exciting times follow as the vacatic 
time continues. Juvenile. 

German language: Fiedler, H. and Sandbach, F.E, A first German course for science 
students. 3v NYPL 

Gibson, Katharine. The oak tree house, lv Cleveland 

Simple story in England of Edward VI told in humorous folk tale manner. When 
the Goodman and his Dame were evicted from their little farm they packed their 
possessions into a gypsy cart and set out. As they rested under a great oak 
tree growing in the middle of the King's Highway, the Goodman got the idea of 
building a house in the tree. Later this little house gave refuge to a king's 
messenger. In return for this, the boy King Edward gave them the tree and visit- 
ed them. For children. 

Grishina, N.G. Peter-pea, lv Cleveland 

A Russian Tom Thumb story for little children. Peter is very tiny, no bigger 
than the pea he grew from in response to the great desire of a childless couple 
for a child of their own. He has many adventures similar to those of Tom Thumb 
and in the end marries a princess. 

Guideposts Associates, Inc. Guideposts anthology, 19 U8 -1952. lv 1952 NYPL 

Haywood, Carolyn. Betsy and the boys. - 2v 19U5 Cleveland 

Everyday doings in such a matter of fact, realistic story that one forgets it is 
only a story. Billy learns what happens when he sends for flea soap C.O.D. that 
he can't sell, and has to earn money to repay his father. Betsy learns from a 
sad Valentine Day that you can' t jump to conclusions. 

Hepler, John J. Master of the Hammond organ. Anyone can play itt — from 6 to 60, 
lv NYPL 

Hersey, John. Hiroshima. 2v 19 U6 Cleveland Also available as Talking Book 
A reporter's story of six survivors of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, 
compiled from his interviews with them. 



10. 

Kenny, John B. The complete bock of pottery making. Uv 19 U9 Cleveland 

Text is suited for the beginner. Casting wheel, coil, slab and molding methods 

are described as well as firing, glazing and decorating. 
McNickle, D'Arcy. They came here first. 6v 19U9 Cleveland 

History of the American Indian from his immigration to Worth America through 

Alaska from Asia to his subjection and almost complete extinction under the white 

man's domination. 
MacPherson, John. The Mystery Chef s never fail cookbook. Uv 19k9 NYPL 
Mathiews, Franklin K. Stories boys like best. Uv Cleveland 

Eighteen short, modern, action stories with a varieiyof subjects currently of 

interest to boys. 
Neal, Julia. By their fruits. 5v 19U7 Cleveland 

History of a colony of Shakers (Union Believers) in Logan County, Kentucky, from 

time of its founding in 1607 until its dissolution in 1922. 
Patch, Edith M. Holiday meadow, lv Cleveland 

Pleasant authentic all year round nature stories for children in the third and 

fourth grades. 
Pratt, Theodore. Miss Dilly says no* Uv 19U5 Cleveland 

Mill Dilly is the meek secretary of a pompous producer who suddenly comes into 

fame when studios begin bidding franticallyfbr screen rights to her "Hollywood 

Diary." 
Putnam, G.P. Hickory shirt. 3v 19U9 Cleveland 

A young Vermonter and a deserter from the army struggle for the leadership of 

a small group of pioneers stranded in Death Valley, and for the love of Nancy 

Langford. Setting is in 18£0' s* 
Questions with answers for examinations: Casualty and Surety lv Cleveland 
Rama Rau, Santha. East of home. Uv 19^0 NYPL 

A further chapter in the autobiography of the author of "Heme to India," this is 

a record of the author' s experiences beginning in 19U7 when she went to Japan as 

hostess for her father, then ambassador to Tokyo, The following year she and a 

friend journeyed through parts of China, Indo-China, Siam, Indonesia, and spent 

several months in Bali. 
Reely, Mary K. Seatmates. 2v 19U9 Cleveland 

This is a story of the everyday happenings among school children centered around 

Kate who moved from the country and farm to the city. She loses her seatmate 

at school one day after being late for school because of a sleigh ride with the 

town "hooky." 
Rose, Grace N. Williamsburg lv Cleveland 

Interesting account of the restoration work in that historic town. 
Scoggin, Margaret C, compiler. The edge of danger. Uv 195l NYPL 

A group of ten adventure stories written by authorities in their field. They are 

divided into Men against Animals and Men against the Elements. 
Sheerin, Maria Williams. The parson takes a wife. 3v 19U8 Cleveland 

The wife of an Episcopalian minister describes some of the humorous incidents and 

misfortunes that she experienced in widely different parishes. 
Taft, Donald R. Criminology. 12v 19U2 Cleveland 

The author has collected and interpreted the more important knowledge about crime 

and its causation. 
Tregaskis, Richard. Seven leagues to Paradise. Uv 19!?1 NYPL 

A travel study in which the author of Guadalcanal Diary" describes his round- the- 

world trip in search of an earthly paradise. His travels included East Indies, 

Asia, Australia, Africa and Europe, and the United States, 
Veblen, Thorstein. Thecry of the leisure class. 6v 1899 Cleveland 

Classical sociological study. 



JL 



11. 



Rose, Grace N. Williaraiburg lv Cleveland 

Interesting account of the restoration work in that historic town, 

Scoggin, Margaret C*, compiler. The edge of danger. i;v 19£l NYPL 

A group of ten adventure stories written by authorities in their field. 
They are divided into Men against Animals and Men against the Elements, 

Sheerin, Maria Williams. The parson takes a wife. 3v 191*3 Cleveland 
The wife of an Episcopalian minster describes some of the humorous 
incidents and misfortunes that she experienced in widely different 
parishes , 

Taft, Donald R» Criminology, 12v 19^2 Cleveland 

The author has collected and interpreted the more important knowledge 
about crime and its causation. 

Tregaskis, Richard, Seven leagues to Paradise, liv 19f>l NYPL 

A travel study in which the author of "Guadacanal Diary" describes his 
round-the-world trip in search of an earthly paradise. His travels in- 
cluded East Indies, Asia, Australia, Africa and Europe, and the United 
States. 

Veblen, Thorstein. Theory of the leisure class, 6v 1899 Cleveland 
Classical sociological study. 

White, Wendell « Psychology in living, 6v 19hh Cleveland 

A book on applied psychology, simplified, using literary reference and 
example rather than casework, 

Yates, Emma H, Seventy miles from a lemon, l;v 19lj.9 Cleveland Also 
available as Talking Book 

In this modern pioneering story, the author and her husband rebelled 
against their city office jobs in 1927and went to Wyoming to start a 
cattle ranch. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publicatio. 



/ 



Volume 21 



December 19f>2 




No. 11 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed Fbrm 

by the 
American foundation for the Blind 
15 West l6th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the U# S. Government 

Through the Library of Congress 

and 

Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 

1839 Frankfort Avenue 

Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the Editor, Diva Agostinelli 
American foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



CONTENTS 
December 1952 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

TALKING BOOKS 

WASHINGTON IRVING 
From "American Authors 1600 to 1900" 

LIST OF FREE MAGAZINES IN BRAILLE EXCLUSIVE OF SCHOOL MAGAZINES 

HAND-COPIED BOOKS 



2. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
December 1952 

PRESS-MADE BOOKS 



All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Govern- 
ment unless otherwise noted. Copies of these Government-supplied books are placed 
in the twenty-eight regional libraries which serve the blind. Readers are required 
to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of Congress to serve 
their respective territories., A list of these libraries and their territories ap- 
pears regularly in the January and June numbers of this magazine. 

In the list which follows, the book notations are based on information appear- 
ing in the "Book Review Digest" and other standard reference works. 

Anderson, Ken. The Austin boys — marooned'* lv 19h2 AFH NUSGP Printed for 

Braille Institute Free Circulating Library, 721 North Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles, 

California Juvenile 
Bareau, Paul. The city, lv 1951 NIB Panda #150 NUSGP Available NYPL 
Barton, Donald R. Before your eyes; the way of life in a museum; Way of Life Series. 

lv 19U1 APH NUSGP Juvenile 
Baruch, Dorothy; Montgomery. Elizabeth; and Gray, W.S. Good times with our friends: 

Aj Health and Personal Development Program. 2v 19U8 APH NUSGP Juvenile 
Bemelmans, Ludwig, At your service; the way of life in a hotel; Way of Life Series, 

lv 19U1 APH NUSGP Juvenile 
The Canadian world day of prayer, pamphlet APH NUSGP Printed for John Milton 

Society, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 
Cooke, Alistair. One man's America, 2v 1952 HP 

Informal essays, originally designed as talks over BBC, setting forth this 

Englishman's reactions to life and manners in the United States. 
Dickson, Carter, pseudonym. And so to murder e 3v 1951 NIB Panda #lU9 NUSGP 

Available NYPL Mystery 
Ditmars, Raymond. Animal kingdom; the way of life in a zoo; Way of Life Series. 

lv 19U APH NUSGP Juvenile 
Duggan, Alfred. Conscience of the king. 3v 1952 CPH 

Historical novel, purporting to be the first-person account of the life history 

of the founder of the West Saxon kingdom. 
Dupuy, R. Ernest and Dupuy, Trevor N. To the colors; way of life of an army officer; 

Way of Life Series, lv 19U2 APH NUSGP Juvenile 
Eberhart, Mignon. Dead men's plans 3 3v 1951 CfH Mystery 
Haddock, Laura B. Blue highway; the way of life on an oceanliner; Way of Life Series* 

lv 19U0 APH NUSGP Juvenile 
Halle ran, E. E. Straw boss. 2v 1952 BIA Juvenile 
Hutchens, Paul. The green tent mystery at Sugar Creek, lv 1950 APH NUSGP 

Printed for Braille Institute Free Circulating Library, 721 North Vermont Avenue, 

Los Angeles, California 
Korson, George. Black land; the way of life in the coal fields; Way of Life Series. 

lv 19U1 APH IJUSGP Juvenile 
Lancaster, Bruce. The secret road, yr 1952 AFH A Revolutionary War novel. 
Library of Congress. A manual of braille proofreading, lv AFH 
Montgomery, Elizabeth; Baruch, Dorothy, and Gray, W. S. Three friends :B; Health 

and Personal Development Program, lv 19U8 AFH NUSGP Juvenile 
Montgomery, Elizabeth and Bauer, W.W. Happy days with our friends: Primer; Health 

and Personal Development Program, lv 19U8 Aph NUSGP Juvenile 
Moon, Truman J., and others. Modern biology, revised edition, llv 1951 AFH 
Oslin, George P. Talking wires; the way of life in the telegraph industry; Way of 

Life Series, lv 19^2 APH NUSGP Juvenile 



Patton, David H. Word mastery speller: III. lv 19U9 APH NUSGP For children 
Price, Edith B. Trail of the treefoil; the way of life of a Girl Scoutj Way of Life 

Series, lv 19Ul APH NUSGP Juvenile 
Rak, Mary K. They guard the gates; the way of life on the American borders; Way of 

' Life Series, lv 19Ul APH NUSGP Juvenile 
Russell, David H.;, Gates, Doris ; and McCullough, Constance M. Roads to adventure :U; 

Ginn Basic Readers Series. Uv 19U8 APH NUSGP 
Russell, David H.; Gates, Doris j and McCullough, Constance M. Trails to treasure :5; 

Ginn Basic Readers Series. Uv 19l9 AFH NUSGP 
Schoffelmayer, Victor. White gold; the way of life in a cotton kingdom; Way of Life 

Series, lv 19kl APH NUSGP Juvenile 
Smith, Nila B. Down the road; first reader; Learning to Read Series. 2v 19U5 AFH 

NUSGP 
White, Ellen G. Christ's object lessons. Uv 1950 APH NUSGp Printed for the 

Christian Record Benevolent Association, 3705 S. H8th Street, Lincoln 6, Nebraska 
Wiggin, Kate Douglas, and Smith, Nora A. The posy ring; a book of verse for chil- 
dren. 3v 1903 APH NUSGP Available NYPL 
Wilkins, Vaughan. Crown without sceptre. Uv 1952 BIA 

Romance of a Jacobite earl and his adopted niece in Italy and England during 

the 1770' s. 



TALKING BOOKS 



Gordon, Mildred and Gordon, Gordon. Campaign train. 13r 1952 APB Read by Karl 
Weber 

Mystery story involving a fictional candidate for the presidency of the United 
States which describes the candidate' s election campaign techniques while on 
a train tour. 

Hemingway, Ernest. OH man and the sea. 5r 1952 AFB Read by Alexander Scourby 
A brief novel about courage. An .old fisherman, overtaken by hard luck, proves 
his tenacity and courage when he hooks a monster marlin. He kills his catch, but 
is towed by it out to sea. He finally returns to Havana, bringing back what he 
the sharks leave of it. Excellent reviews. 

Hughes, Dorothy B. The Davidian report. 13r 1952 AFB Read by Karl Weber 

A suspense novel, set in Los Angeles, in which the FBI, the Communists, and others 
race each other for the mysterious Davidian report. 

Johnson, Pamela H. Catherine Carter. 37r 1952 AFB Read by John Brewster 

The London theatrical world of the lo^O^ is the b ackground for this love story 
of Catherine Carter, actress, and the greatest actor of his time, Henry Peveral* 

Marshall, Catherine. A man called Peter. 26r 1951 AFB Read by Eugene Earl 

Written by his widow, this is a story of Peter Marshall, gifted Scotsman who came 
to America as a young man with practically no money. At the time of his death 
he had served many churches here and was Chaplain of the United States Senate. 

Maxwell, Gavin. Harpoon venture. 17r 1952 AFB Read by Gavin Gordon 

After the war, the author, realizing a long-felt ambition, bought an island in 
the outer Hebrides. Looking for a business there he developed a project for 
hunting and processing the basking shark, the second largest fish known. Though 
the business was a failure, the author had many adventures, now set forth in this 
book. 

Overstreet, H. A. The great enterprise; relating ourselves to our world. l8r 1952 
AFB Read by Kermit Murdock 

The author of "The Mature Mind" goes on in this novel to explore further the 
growth of the individual and his relation to society. 

Payne, Robert. Journey to Persia, l5r 1952 Affi Read by Alexander Scourby 

Under the auspices of the Asia Institute, the author made a trip to the ancient 
cities of Persia, His many reflections on Persian art and history are woven into 
his narrative. 



lu 



WASHINGTON IRVING 
from "American Authors 1600-1900" 
(Upon Request) 

Washington Irving, essayist, biographer, and historian, was born in New York 
City on April 3> 1783, the youngest of the eleven children of William Irving, a 
Scotch merchant from an Orkney family originally named Irvine, and Sarah Sanders 
Irving, granddaughter of an English rector. The father, emigrating to America after 
his marriage, had fought in the Revolution and named his last-born after his comman- 
der-in-chief, who, meeting the child in 1789 when he came to New York to be inaugur- 
ated as the first president, bestowed on the boy his blessing. Irving grew up the 
petted favorite of his much older brothers and sisters, little oppressed by his 
father' s stern Presbyterianism, escaping over roofs to theatres and dancing-school, 
and even, with his mother' s connivance, getting himself confirmed in the Episcopal 
church. His education was desultory, consisting of attendance at half a dozen pri- 
vate schools, none very good; but he was a great reader, and only delicate health 
kept him from following his brothers to college at Columbia. 

In 1798 he began to read law in the offices of a local attorney, but he was an 
indifferent student, and spent most of his ti r ie in contributing to his brother 
Peter's "Morning Chronicle." In 1803 he accompanied an expedition $0 Montreal 
through northern New York; and he gave more attention to social pleasures than to 
either study or writing. In I8OI4. he was threatened with tuberculosis, and his 
brothers sent him abroad where he remained for two years; in Rome, Washington 
Alls ton almost persuaded him to be a painter. When he returned, in 1806, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar, largely thanks to his winning manner rather than to his knowledge 
of the law, and he practiced after a fashion until 1810; the only considerable case 
he was concerned in was Aaron Burr 1 s trial' for treason in 1807, and he had a very 
minor part in that. In 1807, with his brother William and James Kirk Paulding, he 
began producing the series of sketches known as "Salmagundi," a sort of aftermath of 
Additon and forerunner of "Pickwick," and his first real bid for literary fame. 

Meanwhile he had fallen in love with Matilda Hoffman, Judge Hoffman' s daughter, 
who died of tuberculosis at seventeen, during their engagement. There is no doubt 
this was a lasting sorrow to him; but his nephew's sentimental insistence that he 
never again was interested in a woman is pure nonsense; he certainly tried to marry 
Emily Foster in 1822, and he showed varying degrees of attachment for at least half 
a dozen others. As a matter of fact, like many youngest children of large families, 
he was a predestined bachelor. He buried his grief in the task of writing his first 
full-length book, the comic"Knickerbocker' s History of New York," the earliest Amer- 
ican humorous work of literary pretensions, and he occupied himself also in politics 
and business in Washington, where he became a great friend of Dolly Madison, the 
president' s wife. On his retirement from the law he had become a silent partner 
in his brothers' mercantile firm, with a fifth interest. In 1810, he edited the worls 
of Thomas Campbell, the poet, and wrote a biographical sketch for the volume, and in 
the War of 1812 he was aide-de-camp to Governor Daniel Tompkins. In 1813 and l8lli 
he edited the "Analectic Magazine," in Philadelphia. The next year his brothers 
sent him to Liverpool to manage their branch there. He expected to return in a 
year or two, but he stayed seventeen years. His father had died in 1810; in 1817 
his mother followed, and the same year the business failed. For the first time 
Irving was faced with the necessity of writing in order to support himself. "Knicker- 
bocker" and his social connections had earned him the friendship of Scott, Moore, 
and Byron, and now Scott interested him in German literature and romantic history, 
and fostered his natural bent toward the picturesque. "The Sketch Book," published 
in 1819 and 1820, and containing those immortal tales, "Rip Van Winkle" and "The 
Legend of Sleep y Hollow," made him actually famous. His head a little turned, he 



spent a gay year in Paris, then, in 1822, spent a winter in Dresden. In both places, 
he neglected his own work sadly, though he collaborated on several anonymous farces 
with John Howard Payne. 

His reputation far from helped by the negligible "Tales of a Traveller," a sort 
of rewarming of the remains of better material, he spent two unhappy years, partly 
in France, partly in England. To this period belongs the strange episode with Mary 
Godwin Shelley, who seems to have been in love with him while Payne, who acted as 
go-between, was in love with her* Irving finally dropped all his perplexities be- 
hind him, when in 1826 he went to Madrid, under semi-official auspices, to write his 
"life of Columbus." On this book he really worked, and it remains the best of his 
biographical and historical productions. He was recalled to London as secretary of 
the United States Legation in l829 5 and in 1832 he returned to America, to find 
himself greeted as a triumphal hero* There were voices to say that he was an Anglo- 
phile and an arch-conservative — both of which charges were more or less true — but 
they were drowned out by evidences of Irving' s indisputable patriotism (he refused, 
later, to write for the "Quarterly Review" because it was anti- American), his charm, 
and his services as a literary ambassador from America to Europe. 

He soon wearied of the adultation, and in I832 accompanied an expedition to the 
Osage and Pawnee Indian tribes, from this grew "Astoria" and other minor Western 
works, and also his friendship with John Jacob Astor, as a result of which he be- 
came one of the founders of the Astor Library (now part of the New York Public Lib- 
rary). On his return he bought an estate near Tarrytown, known as "Sunnyside," 
though he preferred its old name of "Wolf erf s Roost," and settled there with two 
of his brothers and several nieces. In I838 he began a history of the conquest 
of Mexico, but finding that Prescott had already started such a work, graciously 
relinquished it. Erom 1839, just w hen financial affairs were beginning to be 
straightened again, he was guaranteed $2000 a year in exchange for monthly contri- 
butions to the "Knickerbocker Magazine." In I8I4.2, after he had declined offers of 
the mayoralty of New York, a seat in Congress, and the secretaryshipof the navy 
under Van Buren, Tyler appointed him minister to Spain. He accepted, and served 
for four years, though his prepccupation with political problems tarnished the charm 
of the early days that had produced not only "Columbus," but also the "Conquest 
of Granada" and the "Alhambra," and he wrote little. Indeed, his writing days were 
nearing their close, and on his return to "Sunnyside" in 18U6 he undertook only two 
more important works — the pedestrial "Mahomet" and the "Life of Washington, " begun 
in enthusiasm, ended in exhaustion. The effort probably killed himj he died sudden- 
ly June 27, I838 of a heart attack at the age of seventy-six. 

The word that is always used of Washington Irving is "charm." He was one of 
the most magnetic and sweetest-natured of men, with his bright dark grey eyes, his 
stoutish figure, his delightful smile, his head (on which in latter years a wig re- 
placed the vanished hair) held a little to one side. He was modest, kindly, a ro- 
mantic to his fingertips, sentimental over old things — old scenes, old stories, old 
customs, old friends— the soul of courtesy. And as he was, so he wrote. Van Wyck 
Brooks speaks of his shaping, "in charming prose," tbje legends of the Hudson RLverj 
Richard Garnett remarks on his "easy narrative," his "pellucid style," and calls 
him "exquisite in all -things." These are not the phrases in which one evaluates the 
greatest literary work, and indisputably he was a minor writer. But he was a minor 
writer of the foremost rank. He actually established, in "Columbus" and "The Com- 
panions of Columbus," an American school of history. The dry quiet humor of "Knicker- 
bocker" has genetic relationship w ith the boisterous humor soon to arise in the Wes- 
tern frontier^ both are essentially Americaa, 

To paraphrase George Haven Putnam (son of the publisher to whom Irving was faith- 



6, 

ful even through bankruptcy), Irving' s lasting fame arises through the coincidence 
of marked, if limited talents, and of essential sweetness of character, with the 
formative years of nineteenth century America, The giants about to arise or in tteir 
earliest glory— Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Whitman — the New England pundits — Long- 
fellow, Lowell, Holmes — all overtopped him; but he was first. In New York,,, with no 
better rivals than Bryant and Halleck and Willis, he seemed even greater than he 
was. But before Emerson and Lowell, he married American literature to the litera- 
ture of the world. He has every right to retain the title enthusiastically be- 
stowed upon him, of "Father of American Literature." And if all else were lost, 
Rip Van Winkle and Ichabod Crane will live forever. 

Editor's note: Among the author's books the following are in braille or 
Talking Book form: 

The Alhambra»7v Grade l| NUSGP Available NTPL 

The Alhambra. 26r AFB Read by Kermit Murdock 

Chronicles of the conquest of Granada. 8v Grade ij NUSGP Available NYPL 

John Bull. (in Matthews: "Oxford Book of American Essays") NUSGP Available NYPL 

Legend of sleepy hollow, lv Grade lj NUSGP Available NYPL 

Life and voyages of Christopher Columbus, Book I,3v; Book II, 2v; Book III,3v; 

Book U, lv 
Life and voyages of Christopher Columbus, llr AE3 Read by Alvyn Bach 
Old Christmas. lOr APH Read by George Patterson 

Rip Van Winkle (j.n Cournis: "American Short Stories of the 19th Century") 
Rip Van Winkle (in Jessup: "Representative American Short Stories") 
Rip Van Winkle, (in Irving: "Sketch Book") 5v Grade ij NUSGP Available NYPL 
Sketch book* 20r APH Read by George Patterson 
Sketch book of Geoffrey Crayon. 5v Grade lj NUSGP Available NYPL 

LIST OP FREE MAGAZINES IN BRAILLE EXCLUSIVE OF SCHOOL MAGAZINES 

Alabama Brass* Publisher: Alabama School for the Blind Alumni and Workers Associa- 
tion, Talladega, Alabama. Grade 2; November, January and March. Of interest 
to the blind residents of Alabama 3 

All Story Braille Magazine, with legislative supplement. Publisher: American Broth- 
erhood for the Blind, 257 South Spring Street, Los Angeles 12, California. Grade 
2; monthly; fiction from current magazines; and legislative items. Free but cir- 
culation limited, 

American Legion Magazine, Publisher: American Legion, 580 Fifth Avenue, New York, 
New Yorko Embossed by Clovernook Printing House for the Blind, Mt, Healthy, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, Grade l|-; monthly; free for blinded veterans, 

Badger Informer. Publisher: Badger Association of the Blind, 912 N. Hawley Road, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Grade 1^; quarterly; a house organ (of interest to blind 
residents of Wisconsin), 

B ible Expos itor. Publisher: Christian Record Benevolent Association, 3705 South 
U8th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska. Grade 1^ and New York Point; monthly; discussion 
of Bible topics. 

Braille Baptist. Publisher: Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 
161 Eighth Avenue N,, Nashville 3, Tennessee, Grade If; monthly; a religious 
magazine. 

Braille Book Review. Publisher: American Foundation for the Blind, 15 West 16th 
Street, New York 11, N, Y. Grade 2; also a mimeographed edition; monthly except 
August; a guide to braille and Talking Book publications. 

Braille Evangel, Publisher: Braille Evangel Commission, Seminary Hill Station, Fort 
Worth 10, Texas c Grade ltjr; monthly; a religious (Baptist) magazine. 



., 



7o 



Braille Map Quarterly. Publisher: Howe Press, Perkins Institution, Water town 72, 

Massachusetts. Grade 2; quarter ly; map and 12 to 16 pages of text; current 

events. 
Braille Musician. Publisher: Louis Braille Institute of America, lUO West 58th 

Street, New York 19, N. Y. Grade 2; bi-monthly; articles of interest to blind 

musicians and music students. 
Braille Radio News. Publisher: Clovernook Printing House for the Blind, Mt. Healthy 

Cincinnati, Ohio. Grade if; monthly radio magazine. Limited free copies. 
Braille Star Theosophist. Publisher: Theosophical Book Association for the Blind, 

Kro.tona, Ojai, California. Grade 2; quarterly; theosophical material. 
Catholic Digest, Publisher: Catholic Digest, Ul East Eighth Street, St. Paul 2, 

Minnesota, Grade if; monthly; summary of articles of general interests 
Catholic Messenger. Publisher: Catholic Guild for the Blind, h9 Franklin Street, 

Boston, Massachusetts. Gradelf; monthly; maga z ine for children, for the use 

of the students at Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind. 
Catholic Review for the Blind. Publisher: Xavier Society for the Blind, l5b East 

23rd Street, New York 10, N. Y. Grade 2,; bi-monthly; a religious magazine. 
Children 1 s Friend. Publisher: Christian Record Benevolent Association, 3705 South 

U8th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska. Grade if; monthly; a magazine for children., 
Christian Record. Publisher: Christian Record Benevolent Association, 3705 South 

U8th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska. Grade if and New York Point; monthly; religiov.s 

articles and topics of general interest. 
Christian Record Sabbath School Monthly. Publisher: Christian Record Benevolent 

Association, 3705 South U8th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska. Grade if and New York 

Point; a religious magazine of Bible lessons. 
Church Herald for the Blind. Publisher: National Council of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church, Committee on Literature for the Blind, 28l Fourth Avenue, Ndw York. 

New York. Grade if; monthly. 
Detroit Eye Opener. Publisher: Michigan Foundation for the Blind, Circulation 

Department, 1250 Lillibridge Avenue, Detroit lU, Michigan. Grade if; bi-monthly; 

information for the blind of Michigan. 
Discovery. Publisher: John Milton Society, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York 10, N. Y. 

Grade 2; monthly, September-May; a religious magazine for boys and girls with 

Sunday School lessons. 
Forward Day by Day. Publisher: Forward Movement Publications of the Episcopal 

Church, Ul2 Sycamore Street, Cincinnati 2, Ohio. Grade if; bi-monthly; a re- 
ligious magazine. 
Good Cheer. Publisher: Good Cheer, 712 Madison Street, Topeka, Kansas. Grade 2; 

quarterly; articles, stories, helpful hints of interest to the deaf-blind and 

letters from readers; free to the deaf-blind. 
Gospel Messenger. Publisher: Gospel Association for the Blind, 3756 103rd Street, 

Corona, L. I., New York. Grade if; monthly; a religious magazine. 
Home Teacher. Publisher: National Braille Press, 88 St. Stephen Street, Boston 15, 

Massachusetts. Grade 2; monthly; professional magazine for home teachers and 

social workers. 
International Lions Juvenile Braille Monthly. Publisher: International Lions Club. 

Embosser: Clovernook Printing House for the Blind, Mt. Healthy, Cinninnati, Ohio. 

Grade if; monthly; a magazine for children. 
Jewish Braille Review. Publisher: Jewish Braille Institute of America, 18U6 Harri- 
son Avenue, New York 53> N. Y. Grade 2; monthly; articles of interest to Jewish 

and non-Jewish readers, including a children's supplement in grade if, 
John Milton Magazine. Publisher: John Milton Society, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York, 

N. Y. Grades if and 2; monthly; a religious magazine. 
John Milton Sunday School Quarterly. Publisher: John Milton Society, 156 Fifth Ave. 

New York 10, N.Y. Gradesllf and 2; quarterly; international Sunday school lessons 
Kentucky Cardinal. Publisher: Kentucky Federation of the Blind, l5l Bellaire Ave., 

Louisville 6, Kentucky. Grade 2; semi-annually. Federation news and news of the 

blind of Kentucky. 



8. 

The Lamp. Publisher: Christian Association for the Blind, U30 East lUlst Street, 
New York Sh f N. Y. Grade 2; bi-monthly; a religious magazine. 

Life and Health. Publisher: Christian Record Benevolent Association, 3705 South 
U8th Street, Lincoln 6, Nebraska. Grade l| 

Lighthouse Gleams. Publisher: New York Association for the Blind, 111 East 59th 
Street, New York 22, N.Y. Grade 2; quarterly; news of the activities of Lighthouse. 

Living Museum. Publisher: Illinois State Museum, Springfield, Illinois. Grade 2; 
monthly; braille edition of inkprint magazine. 

Lutheran Messenger for the Blind. Publisher: Board of Missions to the Blind, Luth- 
eran Church, Missouri Synod. For subscription, write to: Rev. 0. C. Schroeder, 
I6I4.8 East 85th Street, Chicago, Illinois. Grade l|; monthly except August; 
a religious magazine. 

Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blind. Publisher:Matilda Ziegler Publishing Com- 
pany for the Blind, Monsey, N.Y. Grade 1^-, with additional c ontractions, NewYork 
Point and Moon; monthly; a general magazine with special features for the blind. 

Message for the Day. Publisher: Board ©f Social Missions of United Lutheran Church 
in America, 231 Madison Avenue, New York 16, N.Y. Grade 1 \; monthly; a religious 
magazine. 

Messenger to the Sightless. Publisher: Society for the Aid of the Sightless, 3H5 
East Fourth North Street; Provo, Utah. Grade Ijjr; monthly; a religious magazine. 

The Minnesota Bulletin., Publisher: Minnesota State Organization of the Blind, 
1605 Eustis Street^ St. Paul 8, Minnesota. Grade If; bi-monthly. 

The Minnesotana Publisher: Minnesota State Council of Agencies for the Blind, 
1936 Eyndale Avenue South, Minneapolis 5jMinnesota„ Grade 2; monthly except 
August; matters of interest to the blind of Minnesota, 

Negro Braille Magazine (Excerpts from "Jet")* Publisher: Negro Braille Magazine, 
906 Fayetteville Street, Durham, North Carolina. Grade 2; quarterly. 

New York State Federation Bulletin. Publisher: New York State Federation of Workers 
for the Blind, 1±25 James Street, Syracuse, New York. Grade 2; quarterly; organi- 
zation material* 

Our Special. Publisher: NationalBraille Press, 88 St. Stephen Street, Boston, Mass. 
Grade l|; monthly; covers subjects of special interest to women, such as home 
occupations, etc. 

Readers Digest. Publisher :American Printing, House for the Blind, 1839 Frankfort 
Avenue, Louisville 6, Kentucky. Grade 2 and Talking Book; monthly; the inkprint 
magazine reproduced in braille, four parts. 

Searchlight. Publisher: New York Association for the Blind, 111 East 59th Street, 
New York, N.Y. Grade 2; ten times a year; a juvenile magazine. 

The Seer. Publisher* : Pennsylvania Association for the Blind, 1607 North Second 
Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Grade 2 and inkprint; quarterly; official 
organ of the Association. 

Skylark. Publisher: Flavia B. Snyder, Krotona, Ojai, California. Grade 2; quarterly; 
fiction and articles of interest to the deaf-blind; free to the deaf-blind, but 
limited mailing list. 

Teen Time. Publisher: Board of Missions for the Blind, Lutheran Church — Missouri 
Synod. For subscription, write to: Mr. Harold Storm, 6715 Hathaway Road, Bedford, 
Ohio. 

Touch — and Go. Publisher: American Foundation for the Blind, 15 West l6th Street, 
New York 11, N. Y. Grade 2; monthly except July, August; special magazine for 
deaf -blind. 

Unity Daily Word. Publisher: Unity School fbr Christianity, 917 Tracy Avenue, Kan- 
sas City, Missouri. Grade l|; monthly; a religious magazine. 

The Upper Room. Publisher: General Board of Evangelism of the Methodist Church, 
1908 Grand Avenue, Nashville \\, Tennessee. Grade 1-|; bi-monthly. 

We the Blind. Publisher: Pennsylvania Federation of the Blind, 5137 Spruce, Phila- 
delphia 39, Pennsylvania. Grade 2 and inkprint; quarterly; current topics of 
interest to the blind. 



9. 

Wee Wisdom. Publisher: Unity School of Christianity, 917 Tracy Avenue, Kansas City, 

Missouri. Grade l|j monthly ', a magazine for children. 
Weekly News. Publisher: National Braille Press, 88 St. Stephen Street, Boston, 

Massachusetts. Grade Z\ weekly; current news • 
Workbasket for the Blind. Publisher: Workbasket for the Blind, 3°5l 28th Avenue, 

Minneapolis, Minnesota. Grade 2j quarterly. 



HAND-COPIED BOOKS 

This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Unless 
otherwise indicated, these books are in Grade 2. 

Hand-copied books may be located in the libraries as follows 1 After each title 
in this list will be found either initials or the name of a city. These are the ab- 
breviations for the names of the libraries & r the blind, and indicate the libraries 
in which the books are located. A key to these abbreviations, giving the names and 
addresses of each library is included in the January and June issues of the "Braille 
Book Review." 



Scoggin, Margaret C., compiler. The edge of danger. Uv 195>1 NYPJj, 

A group of ten adventure stories written by authorities in their field. They are 
divided into Men against Animals and Men against the Elements, 

Rose, Grace N. Williamsburg, lv Cleveland 

Interesting account of the restoration work in that historic town. 

Sheerin, Maria Williams. The parson takes a wife. 3v 19 U8 Cb veland 

The wife of an Episcopalian minister describes some of the humorous incidents and 
misfortunes that she e xperienced in widely different parishes. 

Taft, Donald R. Criminology. 12v 19U2 Cleveland 

The author has collected and interpreted the more important knowledge about crime 
and its causation. 

Tregaskis, Richard. Seven leagues to Paradise. Uv 195>1 NYP£ 

A travel study in which the author of "Guadalcanal Diary" describes his round-the- 
world trip in search of an earthly paradise. His travels included East Indies, 
Asia, Australia, Africa and Europe, and the United States. 

Veblen, Thorstein. Theory of the leisure class. 6v 1899 Cleveland 
Classical sociological study. 

/tfhite, Wendell, Psychology in living. 6v 19UU Cleveland 

A book on applied psychology, simplified, using literary reference and example 
rather than casework. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 



Volume 22 



January 1953 



No. 1 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind 
15 W e st 16th Street 
New York 11, New York 



c 



Braille Edition Provided by the U« S» Government 

Through the Library of Congress 

and 

Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 

1839 Frankfort Avenue 

Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the Editor, Mrs, Frances M« Gale 
American Foundation for the Blind 
1$ West 16th Street 
New York 11, New York 






- 



C N T E N T..S 
January 195>3 



v* 



u 



PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

TALKING BOOKS 

DISTRIBUTING LIBRARIES FOR GOVERNMENT -OWNED BOOKS 

LIBRARIES GIVING NATION-WIDE SERVICE 

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS MAGAZINE 

WINSTON CHURCHILL 
Fr OTi "Twentieth Century Authors*! 

Poem, "The Square Black Cases" 
By Mary Ella Papineau 

HAND-COPIED BOOKS 



. 



2. 

BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
January 1953 

PRESS-MADE BOOKS 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Govern- 
ment unless otherwise noted. Copies of these Government-supplied books are placed 
in the twenty-eight regional libraries which serve the blind. Readers are required 
to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of Congress to serve 
their respective territories. A list of these libraries and their territories ap- 
pears regularly in the January and June numbers of this magazine. 

In the list which follows, the book notations are based on information appear- 
ing in the "Book Review Digest" and other standard reference works. 

Adair, Mattie A. Daily living in our home: Unit III; Curriculum for Ungraded 
Pupils, lv APH NUSGP Printed for the New York Institute for the Education 
of the Blind, 999 Pelham Parkway, New York, New York. Juvenile 

Aspinwall, Alice. Short stories for short people. 2v 1896 APH NUSGP Juvenile 

Baruch, Dorothy; Montgomery, Elizabeth ; and Gray, William S. Five in the family: 
>*? C; Health and Personal Development Program, lv 19hB APH NUSGP Juvenile 

Brewer, John M. and Landy, Edward. Occupations today; new edition. 7v» 1943 
APH NUSGP Juvenile 

Burkard, William E.; Chambers, Raymond L,; and Maroney, Frederick W. Health for 
young Americans: VI I; Health-Happiness-Success Series. $v 19h3 APH NUSGP 
Juvenile 

Burkard, William E.; Chambers, Raymond L,; and Maroney, Frederick W. Working 
together for health; VIII; Health-Happiness-Success Series. i*v. 19k3 APH 
NUSGP Juvenile 

Burkard, William E,: Chambers, Raymond L.; and Maroney, Frederick W. Good Health 
is fun: IV; Health-Happiness-Success Series. 3v 19^6 APH NUSGP Juvenile 

Crabbe, Ernest H. and Salsgiver, Paul L» General business; with applied arithmetic: 
6th ed. lOv 1951 APH NUSGP Juvenile 

Gambs, John S. Man, money and goods, kv 1952 APH 

A survey of the fundamentals of economics; a book for inquiring minds. 

Gulick, Bill. A drum calls west. 3v 1951 APH 

A post-civil war western of greater substance and superiority which follows the 
fight of Mark Bradley against the ring of killers who terrorize and victimize 
Goldtown, Idaho. 

Hibben, Frank Cummings. Treasure in the dust; exploring ancient North America, kv 
1951 APH 

Lively account of the earliest inhabitants of North America. Story expanded be- 
yond Folsom and Sandia men to include chapters on Eskimo, the early Indians of 
the West and the Great Plains, the Moundbuilders, the Aztecs and the Mayas. 

McSpadden, J. Walker. Robin Hood and his merry outlaws; with an introduction by 
May Lamberton Becker. 3v 1923 APH NUSGP Juvenile 

Robin Hood is a must in every 9 to 12 year old's reading. The introduction gives 
one a sense of his place in history as well as legend. 

Patton, David H. Word mastery speller; II. lv 19i*9 APH NUSGP Juvenile. 

Patton, David H. Word mastery speller: IV 2v 19^9 APH NUSGP Juvenile. 

Russell, David H. ; Snedaker, Mabel; and Gates, Doris, Doorways to discovery* 7; 
Ginn Easic Readers. 6v 1952 APH NUSGP Juvenile 

White, Nelia Gardner. The merry month of May; and two other short novels. 3v 19^9 
APH 

Three short novels in each of which a woman at a turning point of her life is the 
central character. "The merry month of May" is a stimulating emotional experi- 
ence — and its after-effects are as refreshing as its title. 



J 



\ i 



3. 



TALKING BOOKS 



H* 



i- 



Appleby, John. Barbary hoard, liir 1952 APH Read by Milton Metz. 

An adventure tale dealing with the search for buried treasure in North Africa 
by two mutually hostile groups of Englishmen. Individuality of prose and novel- 
istic skill enable the author to turn a conventional theme into somslhing fresh 
and entrancing. 

Berrill, Norman John. Journey into wonder, 23r 1952 AFB Read by Karl Weber. 
As a naturalist, and especially as a marine biologist, Mr. Berrill gives a fresh 
and illuminating perspective to the published accounts of and by the explorers, 
freebooters, naturalists and scientists who have investigated the American Con- 
tinents, some of the islands off their coasts, Antarctica, and the Atlantic and 
Pacific Oceans during the past 500 years. 

Bindt, Juliet. A handbook for the blind* l8r 1952 AFB Read by Alexander Scourby. 
An aid for the blind and for these who work with them by a woman who has been 
blind since she was thirteen. Gives practical suggestions on clothing; how to 
handle food at home or in restaurants; how to travel alone; guide dogs; pro- 
blems in marriage; housekeeping; cooking; etc. 

Brooks, Winfield Sears. The shining tides; a novel, litf* 1952 APH Read by Bud 
Abbott. 

A novel about Cape Cod and a great fish, a striped bass, whose comings and goings 
had a lot to do with the lives of some of the inhabitants. A most unusual story 
heartily recommended for the general reader, with very special interest for the 
fisherman. Those who know the Cape (especially who have known the thrill of 
striped-bass fishing) will relive their own experiences, feel the tug on their 
lines, and enjoy the thrill of the play* 

Gallic o, Paul William. Trial by terror. 15>r 1951 APH Read by William Gladden. 
Story of a young American reporter who purposely puts himself into the power of 
the authorities behind-the-iron-curtain in order to find out why other men had 
confessed to crimes they had not committed. This novel has the speed and ex- 
citement of a first-rate film... The result is occasionally somewhat far-fetched in 
detail, but the main action of the novel has since been repeated in real life 
and Mr, Gallico describes it convincingly and with insight. Mixed reviews. 

Frye, Pearl. The sleeping sword. 33r 1952. AFB Read by John Brewster, 

A historical novel about Admiral ilelson and Lady Hamilton* It begins with Nelson 
saving the royal family of the Two Sicilies from the French, and ends with 
Nelson's death. For an entertaining page out of Napoleonic times which will, in 
a general way, give the reader an idea of this critical period in history, this 
novel is strongly recommended. 

Haycox, Ernest, Pioneer loves, 13r 1937 AFB Read by Jim Denver. 
A tale of the Old West by one of the topnotchers in his field. 

Henry, 0. (William Sidney Porter) The four million. lOr 1906 APH Read by 
Lamar Crask. 

Collection of short stories by this master story-teller. Each with its typical 
surprise ending. 

Home, Howard. Concord bridge. 17r 1952 APH Re-\d by George Barnes. 

Historical novel about the beginning of the American Revolution. The scene is 
Boston and Concord, and among the characters, sympathetically portrayed, are 
General Gage; Dr. Warren; a young British officer , Captain De Lancey; and the 
beautiful French-American spy, Eugenie de Malmedy-Armagnac « Reviews mostly 
favorable • 

Johnson, Pamela Hansford. Catherine Carter. 37r 1952 AFB Read by John Brewster. 
The London theatrical world of the 1880 *s is the background of this love story of 
Catherine Cartel, actress, and the grea+est actor of his time, Henry Peverel. 



The theatrical background adds glamour to the novel and gives an opportunity 
for an unusually varied and vivid group of subordinate characters, but the 
conflicts of emotion and pride that are the substance of the story could have 
occurred in almost any setting. 



f* 



Residents of — 
Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 



Arkansas 

California 
(Northern) 

California 
(Southern) 

Colorado 



Connecticut 



Delaware 



DISTRIBUTING LIBRARIES FOR GOVERNMENT -CWNED BOOKS 



Borrow books from— 



Kriegshaber Library for the Blind, 679 Piedmont Avenue, N, E, 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Library for the Blind, Seattle Public Library, 731 North 35>th 
Street, Seattle, Washington 

Braille Institute of America Library, 7^1 North Vermont Avenue, 
Los Angeles, California 

Oklahoma Library Commission, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

California State Library, 2709 Derby Avenue, Sacramento, Calif, 



Braille Institute of America Library, 7^1 North Vermont Avenue, 
Los Angeles, California 

Books for the Blind, Denver Public Library, 37th and York 
Streets, Denver, Colorado 

Library for the Blind, New York Public Library, 137 ^est 2£th 
Street, New York, New York 

Free Library of Philadelphia, Logan Square, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania 



District of Columbia Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C* 



Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 
Idaho 



Illinois (north of 
Springfield) 



Florida Library for the Blind, Welch Convalescent Center, 
F. C, B. No, 12, Daytona Beach, Florida 

Kriegshaber Library f r the Blind, 679 Piedmont Avenue, N,E. 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Library of Hawaii, Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii 

Library Association of Portland, 801 S, W. Tenth Avenue, 
Portland, Oregon 

Illinois School for the Blind, Chicago Public Library, 
Chicago, Illinois 



5. 



Illinois (south in- 
cluding Springfield) 

Indiana 



Iowa 
Kansas 

Kentucky- 
Louisiana 

Maine 

|_f Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan (outside 
Wayne County) 

Michigan (Wayne 
County) 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New Mexico 



Illinois School for the Blind Library, Jacksonville, 
Illinois 

Service for the Blind, Indiana State Library, Indianapolis 
Indiana 

Illinois School for the Blind Library, Jacksonville, 111. 

Wolfner Memorial Library for the Blind, 38i4.il Olive Street, 
St. Louis, Missouri 

Cincinnati Public Library, 629 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Library for the Blind, Public Library of New Orleans, New 
Orleans, Louisiana 

Perkins Institution Library, Watertown, Massachusetts 

Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

Perkins Institution Library, Watertown, Massachusetts 

State Library for the Blind, Saginaw, Michigan 

Department for the Blind, Wayne County Library, 3661 Trumbull 
Avenue, Detroit, Michigan 

Minnesota Braille and Sight-Saving School Library, Faribault, 
Minnesota 

Library for the Blind, Public Library of New Orleans, New 
Crleans, Louisiana 

Wolfner Memorial Library for the Blind, 38UU Olive Street, 
St Louis, Missouri 

Library for the Blind, Seattle Public Library, 731 North 35th 
Street, Seattle, Washington 

Nebraska Public Library Commission, State Capitol, Lincoln 9 
Nebraska 

California State Library, Sacramento, California 

Perkins Institution Library, Watertown, Massachusetts 

Free Library of Philadelphia, Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Books for the Blind, Denver Public Library, 37th and York 
Streets, Denver, Colorado 



6. 



M. 



Mew York (other than 
Greater New York City 
and Long Island) 

New Y ork (Greater 
New York City and 
Long Island) 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 



Library for the Blind, New York State Library, Albany, 
New York 



Library for the Blind, New York Public Library, 137 West 25th 
Street, New York, New York 



Chio (south of 
Columbus) 

Ohio (north, including 
Columbus) 



Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington,D. C« 

Minnesota Braille and Sight-Saving School Library, Faribault, 
Minnesota 

Cincinnati Public Library, 629 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 



T ^ r " Oklahoma 
Oregon 



Pennsylvania (east of 
Harrisburg ) 

Pennsylvania (west 
including Harrisburg) 

Puerto Rico 



Library for the Blind, Cleveland Public Library, Cleveland, 
Chio 

Oklahoma Library Commission, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

Library Association of Portland, 801 Sȴ. Tenth Avenue, 
Portland, Oregon 

Free Library of Philadelphia, Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Rhode Island 
South Carolina- 
South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Virgin Islands 



Division for the Blind, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, 
Pittsburgh,, Pennsylvania 

Library for the Blind, New York Public Library, 137 West 2£th 
Street, New York, New York 

Perkins Institution Library, Watertown, Massachusetts 

Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D»C» 

Minnesota Braille and Sight-Saving School Library, Faribault, 
Minnesota 

Cincinnati Public Library, 629 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Chio 

Texas State Library, Austin, Texas 

Books for the B lind, Free Public Library, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Library for the Blind, New York State Library, Albany, N. Y. 

Division for the Blind, Library of Congress, Washington, D»C* 

Library for the Blind, New York Public Library, 137 West 2^th 
Street, New York, New York 



■ 



«* 



Washington 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming 



Library for the Blind, Seattle, Public Library, 731 North 
35th Street, Seattle, Washington 

Division for the Blind, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Department of Books for the Blind, Chicago Public Library, 
Chicago, Illinois 

Books for the Blind, Free Public Library, Salt Lake City, Utah 

PRIVATE LIBRARIES GIVING NATION-WIDE SERVICE 



Braille Circulating Library, 70k West Grace Street, Richmond, Virginia 
Circulates only religious books 

Jewish Braille Library, 181*6 Harrison Avenue, New York 53, New York 

New York Guild for the Jewish Blind, 1880 Broadway, New York 23, New York 

Theosophical Book Association for the Blind, Krotona, Ojai, California 
Circulates only theosophical books 

Xavier Society for the Blind Library, 151* East 23rd Street, New York 10, New York 

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS MAGAZINE 

American Bible Society, 1*50 Park Avenue, New York 22, New York 

American Foundation for the Blind, 15 West 16th Street, New York, New York 



ABS 
AFB 
APH 



American Printing House for the Blind, 1839 Frankfort Avenue, Louisville 
6, Kentucky 



ARC American Red Cross, 616 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 

BIA Braille Institute of America, 7Ul North Vermont Ave. Los Angeles 27, Calif, 

CPH Clovernook Printing House for the Blind, 6990 Hamilton Ave. Cincinnati, Ohio 

HP The Howe Press, Perkins Institution, Watertown, Massachusetts 

JBI Jewish Braille Institute of America, 181*6 Harrison Ave. New York 53, N.Y. 

LC Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

NIB National Institute for the Blind, 22l* Great Portland St. London W 1, Eng. 

NY Guild New York Guild for the Jewish Blind, 1880 Broadway, New York, New York 

NYPL New York Public Library, Library for the Blind, 137 West 25th Street, 
New York, Neitf York 



TEA 



Theosophical Book Association for the Blind, Krotona, Ojai, California 



8. 



Jt 



WINSTON LEONARD SPENCER CHURCHILL 
From "Twentieth Century Authors" 

Born November 30, 187U, Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill, English statesman, 
soldier, historian, and biographer, was the third son of the late Lord Randolph 
Churchill, the grandson of the seventh Duke of Marlborough, and the direct descendant 
of the victor of Ramillies and Malplaquet. His mother was an American, the former 
Jennie Jerome of New York. He was educated at Harrow School and the Royal Military 
College, Sandhurst, whence he passed into the army, serving in several colonial cam- 
paigns. During the South African War he acted as war correspondent for the London 
"Morning Post," was captured by the Boers, and escaped under exciting conditions. 



Churchill was returned to Parliament as a Conservative 
Liberals in 190U, participated in their electoral triumph in 
year was made Under-Secretary for the Colonies. Promoted to 
Board of Trade in 1908, he was beaten in the consequent by-e 
Manchester, but fought and won Dundee, for which division he 
1922. In 1910-11 he held the high office of Home Secretary ; 
he went to the Admiralty as first Lord, and is recognized as 
that position in modern times. It was in great measure due 
the British Fleet was ready at its stations in August 19lU. 



in 1900, He joined the 
1906, and in the same 
the Presidency of the 

lection at Northwest 
continued to sit until 
and in the latter year 
the ablest holder of 

to his foresight that 



The abortive expeditions to Antwerp and Gallipoli, though well- conceived 
strategically, both ended in tragic failure, and did great harm to Churchill's repu- 
tation and career. In 1915 he was reduced to minor office as Chancellor of the 
Duchy of Lancaster, and shortly afterwards resigned and went to France as an officer. 
He had several narrow escapes from death. In 1917 he returned to politics as 
Minister of Munitions, and from 1919 to 1921 he was Minister for War and Air. In 
1921 he went to the Colonial Office once more. At the election of 1922 he was beaten 
at Dundee. He had made himself still more unpopular by a third abortive military 
expedition — to help the White Russians on the Murman Coast; and was rejected by two 
more constituencies at by-elections in 1923 and 192Uj but at the General Election of 
192U he was at last restored to Parliament by the Epping Division (near London), for 
which he has sat uninterruptedly ever since. Stanley Baldwin (now Earl Baldwin) made 
him Chancellor of the Exchequer, and he served as such until a Labor Government came 
in in 1929 • He had no further office until the outbreak of the war against Hitler, 
which brought him back to the Admiralty. On the resignation of Neville Chamberlain 
after the Norwegian debacle early in May 19h0, Winston Churchill at sixty-five became 
Britain's Prime Minister — thirty- five years after the first biography of him had 
been published^ 

This almost telegraphic account of a great public figure should be supplemented 
by other reading. What must concern this book mainly is Churchill' s activity as a 
printed author, which has always been considerable. Beginning with "The Story of the 
Malakand Field Force," in I898, he has produced many works of history and biography, 
the most notable of which have been his "The World Crisis," "Marlborough," and "Lord 
Randolph Churchill." His personal familiarity with momentous happenings, his fine 
expository power in matters of strategy and tactics, his welding of source material 
into an artistic whole, his sense of color and adventure, his polished and felicitous 
style, make him one of Britain's most skilled writers in his own field. 

Yet it may well be that Winston Churchill's lasting reputation in letters, as 
well as politics, will finally rest on his magnificent, moving war-time orations 
after his rise to the premiership in his country's darkest hour. That these are 



9. 

"literature" in the most ancient and epic sense of the word, few who have heard or 
read them will deny. As Lewis Gannett has said, his phrases "seem destined to go 
ringing down the years, in the mouths of schoolboys who repeat the historic words of 
history. They do not ape emotion; they express it"; while "Time" has predicted that 
his "throbbing passages" will live as long as Shakespeare's. Or, as Rosemary and 
Stephen Benet phrased it, "Through Churchill all England spoke." 

Churchill the man is a vivid, dogged, and tenacious character, who has always 
been a fighter and has always profoundly believed in himself, while remaining able 
(on occasion) to laugh at himself as heartily as at others. He is master of the 
pungent phrase, of forensic fisticuffs; but, perhaps more important than that, he 
never fails to see events and personalities in a large way. In times of peace he 
lives at itfesterham, Kent, where he likes to play at bricklaying. But his real hobby 
is fine art, and he is a better painter than many who consider themselves profes- 
sionals. On the personal side he is noted for his cherubic face, his perpetual big 
cigar, his invariable bow-tie, and his extraordinary variety of hats. 



* 



Editor' s note: 
Book form: 



Among the author's books the following are in braille or Talking 



Blood, sweat and tears, S>v Grade 2 APH 

Blood, sweat and tears. 32r AFB Read by Alexander Scourby 

Great contemporaries. 3v Grade 2 NIB 

Great contemporaries. 12r NIB 

My early life. £v Grade 2 NIB 

The second World War. First series. Part I. Grade 2 NIB 

The war of the unknown warriors. Recording of speech. 2r NIB 

The world crisis. Part I. Abridged edition. IfUr NIB 

Tne world crisis. Part II. Abridged edition. 12r NIB 

The world crisis. Part III. Abridged edition. 17r NIB 



THE SQUARE BUCK CASES 
By Mary Ella Paplneau 



I wait for the postman to leave at my door, 

The square black cases that I adore; 

When I open them up I know I shall find 

The artistic achievement of some brilliant mind. 

Then onto the turntable the records I lay, 
The voice of the reader is soon on the way; 
Telling us stories of love and romance; 
Or some thrilling adventure of far away France. 

Maybe a laugh at some funny jest; 
Or gun-fighting cowboy out of the West; 
A mystery or two so full of suspense, 
That leaves us breathless with no defense. 



Thousands of people in this land of ours 
Are watching and waiting and counting the hours, 
For the postman to come and leave at their door 
The square black cases they all adore. 



10. 



HAND-COPIED BOOKS 



* 



Yates, Emma H. Seventy miles from a lemon. hv 19^9 Cleveland Also available as 

Talking Book 

In this modern pioneering story, the author and her husband rebelled against their 

city office jobs in 1927 and went to Wyoming to start a cattle ranch 
Allen, George E* Presidents who have known me* 3v 1950 LC 

Autobiography of a man who has been known as President Truman's court jester. It 

covers both his personal and his political activities* 
Armstrong, Harry Po Spiritual life songs. 2v LG 
Axline, Virginia Mae* Play therapy; the inner dynamics of childhood. 7v 19ii7 Phil. 

A practical presentation of the application of nondirective therapy techniques 

to play therapy* 
Barnes, Margaret C* With all my heart, hv 1951 Phila Also available as Talking 

Book 

Historical novel based on the life of Catherine of Braganza, Queen of England's 

Charles II. 
Barrymore, Lionel, with Shipp, Cameron, We Barrymores* $v 1951 LC 

Barrymore's autobiography, but contains much about the other members of the family 
Bates, Blanchard, editor, Montaigne—selected essays. The Charles Cotton— W. C» 

Hazlitt translation. 9v ±9k9 NYPL 
Bronte, Emily, Wuthering heights* 6v NYGuild Also available as Talking Book 
Campbell, Grace MacL. Thorn-apple tree • 3v 19^3 LC 

A hovel with a background of frontier and pioneer life in Canada 100 years ago. 
Challis, George, pseudonym. The firebrand. 5v 1935 LC 
Davis, Dorothy S. The clay hand, kv 1950 LC Also available as Talking Book 

Detective story* 
DeAngeli, Marguerite L. The door in the wall. 2v Grade lj 19l)9 NIPL Recently 

added Phila 

Placed in the times of Edward the Third of England, the tale evolves around the 

new page of Lindsay Hall who, in the company of a monk, lives through the plague 

and the battles of England's war* 
Doyle, Kathleen, When mental illness strikes your family* lv 1951 LC 

A Public Affairs Committee (New York) pamphlet. 
Eberhart, Mignon* House of storm, l;v 191j9 LC Recently added Phila Detective 

story. 
Ertz, Susan* Mary Hallam, 5v Grade if- 19^7 Phila Also available as Talking Book 

A novel about a disillusioned young English woman concert pianist who was 

prevented from furthering her career because of an accident to her hand. A young 

Englishman helps to restore her to a happier life. 
Fox, Emmett. fower through constructive thinking, lv Grade if- NYPL 
Fredericks, Carlton. Living should be fun. kv 19h$ NYPL Recently added NYGuild 
Freeman, Lucy* Fight against fears, 6v 1951 LC recently added NYGuild 

A young New York newspaper woman recounts her experiences during her five years 

of psychoanalysis and its results, 
Furst, Bruno, M» D, Stop forgetting; hew to develop your memory and put it to 

practical use, hv 19h9 NYGuild 
Gide, Andre P. G. Two legends: Cedipus and Theseus; translated from the French by 

John Russell, 2v 1950 LC 

Translations of the play "Oedipus", and the fictional narrative 'Theseus','. 
Goldsmith, Martin M, The miraculous fish of Domingo Gonzales, 3v 1950 Phila 

A satirical novel describing an economic boom in a sleepy Mexican fishing village, 

beginning when an American arrived in Puerto Miguel to buy shark livers and ended 

when the processing plant was moved to Santa Clara, due to the strange chemistry 

of "The miraculous fish of Domingo Gonzales." 



11. 



Guareschi, Giovanni, The little world of Don Camillo; translated from the Italian 
by U, V. Troubridge, 3v 1950 LC Also available as Talking Book 

Henry, Thomas R, The white continent; the story of Antarctica, liv 1950 LC Also 
available as Talking Book 

A factual study of the Antarctic continent by a science journalist who was with 
the 19U6— 19U7 Navy expedition under Admirals Byrdaid Crazen, 

Higgins, Marguerite, War in Korea; the report of a woman combat correspondent. 3v 

1951 LC 

The first xiroman correspondent in Korea here reports the war as she has seen it, 

Hoffman, Paul 0-. Peace can be won. 3v 1951 LC 

Former E.C.A. director charts a program of immediate action with long term 
implications by which the United States can assume leadership in combating Russi 
designs against the rest of the world, 

lams, Jack, Do not murder before Christmas, 5v 19^9 LC Detective story, 

Irey, Elmer L. and Slocum, William J* The tax dodgers; the inside story of the 
T-men's war with America's political and underworld hoodlums, 6v I9I18 LC 
The author was for 26 years chief of the Intelligence Unit of the U.S. Treasury, 
The hoodlums include such names as Pendergast, Annenberg, Willie Bioff, Lucky 
Johnson, Al Capone, and Huey Long's confederates, 

Kaltenborn, Hans von. Fifty fabulous years, 1900-1950; a personal review. 6v 

1950 LC 

Autobiography of one of America's best known broadcasters, which combines his 
own life story and a running commentary on American history for a fifty-year 
period. 
Ley, Willy. Dragons in amber; further adventures of a romantic naturalist , 7v 

1951 LC Also available as Talking Book 

A book for those curious about the early ancestry of our more unusual plants 
and animals. The author traces the evolution of various extinct animals and 
such living animals and plants as the milu, panda, ginko trees and sequoias. 

Mason, Van Wyck. The Cairo garter murders. 5v 1938 NYGuild Mystery story. 

Mason, Van Wyck, Dardanelles derelict, 5v 19^9 NYGuild Recently added LC 
Also available as Talking Book* 
A Major North spy story placed in Turkey, 

Nano, Frederic C, The land and people of Sweden, 2v 19h9 LC 
Survey of the history, people and customs of Sweden, 

Nathan, Robert. Innocent Eve, 2v 1951 LC Recently added HIGuild 

A fantasy in which Luther and his secretary Samantha crash a Halloween party 
at a swank New York City hotel. At the party a scheme of Lucifer's concerning 
a certain project is upset by Samantha who is the opposite of innocent, 

Patterson, Samuel H. Problems in American democracy, l5v 1930 Phila 

Robbins, Wilfred W„, and Holman, Esther G. General Botany. 13v Grade l| 1939 Phil 

Roosevelt, Eleanor, This I remember, * 7v 191+9 Chicago Recently added LC Also 
available as Talking Book 

This second volume of Eleanor Roosevelt's autobiography begins with the days 
before Franklin D. Roosevelt's first term as governor of New York and ends a 
short time after his death, 

Ryab, J hn J. The Maggie Murphy, 3v 1951 LC Also available as Talking Book 
An account of the hardships and rewards experienced by two boys just out of 
high school who decided to try their luck fishing for salmon in Alaska, with a 
remodeled derelict boat and forty dollars in cash apiece, 

Sanford, Agnes M, The healing light, hv 19h7 LC 

Schweitzer, Albert. The animal world of Albert Schweitzer; Jungle insights into 
reverence for life, translated and edited witk an introduction by Charles R. Joy 
3v 1950 LC 



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V °l. 21, Q952) 



'SSUED TO 



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BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 

Date DueVol. 21, (1952) 



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Speed 

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PAT. NO 2 204'